fbpx
Tuesday, May 18, 2021

In 2020, We Discovered the 365-Day News Cycle

David Suissa is President of Tribe Media/Jewish Journal, where he has been writing a weekly column on the Jewish world since 2006. In 2015, he was awarded first prize for "Editorial Excellence" by the American Jewish Press Association. Prior to Tribe Media, David was founder and CEO of Suissa Miller Advertising, a marketing firm named “Agency of the Year” by USA Today. He sold his company in 2006 to devote himself full time to his first passion: Israel and the Jewish world. David was born in Casablanca, Morocco, grew up in Montreal, and now lives in Los Angeles with his five children.

https://jewishjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/jj_avatar.jpg
David Suissa
David Suissa is President of Tribe Media/Jewish Journal, where he has been writing a weekly column on the Jewish world since 2006. In 2015, he was awarded first prize for "Editorial Excellence" by the American Jewish Press Association. Prior to Tribe Media, David was founder and CEO of Suissa Miller Advertising, a marketing firm named “Agency of the Year” by USA Today. He sold his company in 2006 to devote himself full time to his first passion: Israel and the Jewish world. David was born in Casablanca, Morocco, grew up in Montreal, and now lives in Los Angeles with his five children.

Until the pandemic crisis hit us earlier this year, it was fashionable to mock the “24-hour news cycle,” the fact that people have such short attention spans that news stories can’t stay hot for more than 24 hours. The media dutifully led the way, serving up a continuous flow of hot breaking news to replace yesterday’s hot breaking news.

This year, however, in an extraordinary shift, the same breaking news story has stayed red hot day after day, month after month. The COVID-19 pandemic was the story that refused to go away, the story that cracked through our diminished attention spans and challenged us not to turn away.

Of the many unprecedented aspects of this pandemic year, let us not forget that one: Wherever we turned, wherever we looked, we were forced to confront an all-consuming crisis.

Wherever we turned, wherever we looked, we were forced to confront an all-consuming crisis.

It was a story with a million offshoots — fatalities, lockdowns, quarantine living, economic meltdowns, loneliness, social distancing, etc. — but at heart, it was one epic meta story. A story that grabbed us and never let go.

In that sense, the pandemic made me think of ancient history. All of these biblical stories we grew up with… weren’t they also meta stories that grabbed us and never let go?

Thousands of years later, we still gather around Seder tables and recount the story of our ancestors’ journey to freedom. We still light Hanukkah candles to recall the fight of the Maccabees. Indeed, every Jewish holiday commemorates an ancient “breaking news story” that never stopped breaking.

The clash between history and the news is a clash between the timeless and the timely. In recent years, with the exponential growth of technology and social media, the latter has crushed the former. When you’re checking your Twitter news feed every minute, who’s got time to contemplate the lessons of the past?

The COVID-19 pandemic gave us time to contemplate. It forced us to stay home. It forced us to slow down. Our restless minds didn’t suddenly morph into those of Greek philosophers, but unlike any year in recent memory, the never-ending pandemic gave our shrinking attention span a run for its money. It gave us a chance to go deeper and see what’s there.

You can feel it especially now, as the year comes to an end. People are looking back. Media companies are doing retrospectives. We’re all in a contemplative mode, reflecting on the one story that dominated all of humanity.

2020 will go down as the year when history caught up to the news, the year when the stunning power of the timeless entered our fragile lives.

Did you enjoy this article?

You'll love our roundtable.

Select list(s) to subscribe to


By submitting this form, you are consenting to receive marketing emails from: Jewish Journal, 3250 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA, 90010, http://www.jewishjournal.com. You can revoke your consent to receive emails at any time by using the SafeUnsubscribe® link, found at the bottom of every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact

Enjoyed this article?

You'll love our roundtable.

Select list(s) to subscribe to


By submitting this form, you are consenting to receive marketing emails from: Jewish Journal, 3250 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA, 90010, http://www.jewishjournal.com. You can revoke your consent to receive emails at any time by using the SafeUnsubscribe® link, found at the bottom of every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact

Editor's Picks

Latest Articles

Culture

Latest Articles
Latest

Put On Purple Day…Raise Lupus Awareness on May 21st

By Matthew Scelza Maggi Knapp, Giving Back to Others on POP Day Like so many other people with lupus, Maggi Knapp spent months searching for an...

Waters: Gaza Has “Moral Obligation to Resist the Occupation” Against Israel

Former Pink Floyd bassist Roger Waters said in a May 13 interview with the Russian state-funded RT that Palestinians in Gaza have a “moral...

CNN Fires Contributor Over Hitler Tweet

CNN announced on May 17 that they have severed ties with a freelance contributor over a since-deleted tweet calling for a new Adolf Hitler.

Israel and the Internet Wars – A Professional Social Media Review

As people around the world watch the escalating crisis in the Middle East unfold, the Jewish diaspora and the Israeli people are turning to...

2 Dead, Over 210 Injured in Synagogue Bleacher Collapse

Israeli paramedics said that at least two worshipers had been killed and at least 213 were injured in a bleacher collapse incident at a synagogue in the West Bank Israeli settlement of Givat Zeev on Sunday.

Hollywood

Podcasts

More news and opinions than at a Shabbat dinner, right in your inbox.

Select list(s) to subscribe to


By submitting this form, you are consenting to receive marketing emails from: Jewish Journal, 3250 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA, 90010, http://www.jewishjournal.com. You can revoke your consent to receive emails at any time by using the SafeUnsubscribe® link, found at the bottom of every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact

x