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December 21, 2022
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With the way the Jewish calendar falls this year, our family is traveling almost all of Hanukkah. We meticulously packed our Hanukkiah, candles and matches, wondering where exactly our celebrations would take place. Would there be a window to let others see the dancing lights? Perhaps we’d witness other stealthy guests lighting their hannukiyot, hidden within their rooms.

As I worried about fire alarms within hotel rooms, I watched the reflection of our faces in a small window, hands lighting the candles, mouths opening to belt out blessings. Yes, we are meant to light the candles to publicize the miracles of thousands of years ago. But, we also light the candles to publicize the miracles of today. Jewish children proudly singing the same songs of their ancestors. Jewish adults passing down the lessons that we may still live through fearful times but the strength of our faith is the fuel that pushes us forward.

Tonight, as we watch our own reflections flickering in the candlelight, let the ancestral lights illuminate the miracles… miracles of yesterday, today and tomorrow.

Shabbat Shalom and Happy Hanukkah

Rabbi Nicole Guzik is a rabbi at Sinai Temple. She can be reached at her Facebook page at Rabbi Nicole Guzik or on Instagram @rabbiguzik. For more writings, visit Rabbi Guzik’s blog section from Sinai Temple’s website.

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