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A Cardboard Tube Menorah For the Kids

This Hanukkah, make a menorah just for the kids.
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December 14, 2022

This Hanukkah, make a menorah just for the kids. This do-it-yourself menorah is made from cardboard tubes, and the “flames” are actually felt, so little fingers won’t get burned. Making the menorah can also be a fun family activity that gets everyone excited about the upcoming holiday. 

What you’ll need:

  • 8 bathroom tissue cardboard tubes
  • 1 paper towel roll tube
  • Wrapping paper
  • Tape
  • Stapler
  • Yellow and orange felt
  • Scissors
  • Glue
  • Clothespins

1. Wrap the cardboard tubes

The eight bathroom tissue tubes are for each night of Hanukkah, and the paper towel tube is for the shamash candle. Trim the paper towel tube to eight inches so it is about twice the height of the shorter “candles.” Cover each cardboard tube with decorative wrapping paper, using tape to adhere the paper. At the ends of each tube, just tuck the paper in rather than taping it. 

2. Staple the tubes together

Line up the tubes with the tallest tube in the center, and staple them together. You can also attach them with glue or tape. Attaching the tubes to each other adds stability so they can stand up without falling. 

3. Cut flame shapes

Cut 3-inch flame shapes out of yellow felt and smaller 2 1/2-inch flame shapes out of orange felt. Glue the orange flames on top of the yellow ones.

4. Glue flames to clothespins

Glue the flames to one side of each clothespin. When it’s time to “light” the candles, just clip the clothespins with the flames onto the wrapped cardboard tubes. 

And the great thing about these felt candles is they will last much longer than eight days and nights — it’s a Hanukkah miracle!

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