fbpx

A Moment in Time: How Life Can Change in a Moment

[additional-authors]
November 16, 2018
Dear all,
One year ago today, I had just boarded an airplane when I received a text from my husband, Ron, who had travelled to Charlotte, NC.
The text read: “I was just run over by a car and have been taken by ambulance to the hospital. Don’t panic.”
Don’t panic???? My husband is being taken by ambulance, and I’m not supposed to panic???
The weeks that followed revealed both the fragility of life as well as the incredible resolve of spirit.
And now, after a full year of physical therapy, Ron is stronger and more active than ever. This weekend, we plan to tackle – no …. we plan to embrace the Baldwin Hills City Overlook!
Not everyone can recover from an injury or illness. So we nurture life as much as we can. Because things can change in any given moment in time.
And we learn to never take our journey for granted.
With love and shalom,
Rabbi Zach Shapiro
Rabbi Zach Shapiro
A change in perspective can shift the focus of our day – and even our lives.  We have an opportunity to harness “a moment in time,” allowing our souls to be both grounded and lifted.  This blog shows how the simplest of daily experiences can become the most meaningful of life’s blessings.  All it takes is a moment in time.
 
Rabbi Zach Shapiro is the Spiritual Leader of Temple Akiba of Culver City, a Reform Jewish Congregation in California.  He earned his B.A. in Spanish from Colby College in 1992, and his M.A.H.L. from HUC-JIR in 1996.  He was ordained from HUC-JIR – Cincinnati, in 1997.  He was appointed to the HUC-JIR Board of Governors in 2018.
Did you enjoy this article?
You'll love our roundtable.

Editor's Picks

Latest Articles

Sacrifice Works Both Ways

If Israel is to recognize a Palestinian state, then the Palestinians should be obligated to recognize Israel – as a Jewish state.

More news and opinions than at a
Shabbat dinner, right in your inbox.

More news and opinions than at a Shabbat dinner, right in your inbox.

More news and opinions than at a Shabbat dinner, right in your inbox.