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California’s bill to combat BDS passes state senate judiciary committee

California State Assembly Bill (AB) 2844 had a long and winding path to its passage by the California State Senate judiciary committee June 28.
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June 29, 2016

California State Assembly Bill (AB) 2844 had a long and winding path to its passage by the California State Senate judiciary committee June 28. It was first submitted to the State Assembly by Richard Bloom (D-Santa Monica) as an attempt to circumvent the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) movement against Israel. 

The bill passed the California Assembly on June 2, but only after a Democratic-controlled appropriations committee had transformed it, including deleting any mention of Israel while changing the language to say boycotts against sovereign nations are unacceptable. The changes were so significant that many of the bill’s original backers said they would not support it further unless the state’s Senate made significant changes.

Significant changes had been made to the bill before the vote Tuesday. The bill that was approved by the judiciary committee no longer prohibits California from entering into contracts with companies boycotting Israel. Instead, it bars the state from entering into contracts with companies that violate California’s anti-discrimination laws, including the Unruh Civil Rights Act and the Fair Employment and Housing Act. The current language no longer includes the word “boycott.” 

The current bill prohibits companies from having policies against a sovereign country, “including, but not limited to, the nation and people of Israel,” that are a pretext for violating anti-discrimination laws. 

The Tuesday vote, according to Bloom, was five in favor and two opposed.

Bloom said he supports the revised version of the bill: “We think it’s specific enough now to send a strong message about BDS-type behavior, which at its most fundamental level is discriminatory behavior, but broad enough to include other circumstances as well as other countries,” he said.

I’m very happy that the bill passed,” Dillon Hosier, senior political adviser for the Israeli-American Nexus, the advocacy arm of the Israeli-American Council, said in a phone interview after the vote held at the State Capitol in Sacramento. “We look forward to seeing it go to the [Senate] appropriations committee. Hopefully, we get a concurrence vote in the assembly and then it’s on to the governor.” 

Hosier was one of several Los Angelenos who spoke in support of the bill before the vote. Others included Rabbi Abraham Cooper of the Simon Wiesenthal Center and Congressman Brad Sherman (D-Sherman Oaks).  Groups supporting the bill include the Jewish Public Affairs Committee of California, 30 Years After and others.

Hannah-Beth Jackson, chair of the Senate judiciary committee, is among the bill’s co-authors. Other members of the committee include Sen. Mark Leno, who voted to support the bill. He said the legislation’s wording improved upon previous versions and that he was “more pleased with this version than any previous versions.”

Sen. Bill Monning voted against the revised bill submitted to the judiciary committee. He believes the bill limits free speech.

“This bill does not seek to condemn acts of anti-Semitism,” he said. “This bill seeks to limit exercise of First Amendment rights.” 

Those speaking against the bill during the public comment portion included Carol Sanders of Jewish Voice for Peace, local progressive activist Marcy Winograd and others. 

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