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Haim Kick Off ‘Women in Music’ Celebrating Their Jewish Roots and Pastrami at Canter’s Deli

Jewish sister group Haim returned to the place they had their first-ever concert: Canter’s Deli in Los Angeles.
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June 26, 2020
LOS ANGELES, CA – FEBRUARY 08: (L-R) Este Haim, Danielle Haim and Alana Haim of Haim attend The 57th Annual GRAMMY Awards at the STAPLES Center on February 8, 2015 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Larry Busacca/Getty Images for NARAS)

To celebrate the release of their already-acclaimed third album, Jewish sister group Haim returned to the place they had their first-ever concert: Canter’s Deli in Los Angeles.

In a live-streamed event, the trio held their June 26 release party for their new album “Women in Music Pt. III,” by playing their new songs in the deli’s dining room. The soft-rock band — who were paid in matzah ball soup the last time they performed there —  cited the home of classic knishes and black and white cookies as the place that launched their career. 

“Shout out to Alex Canter, for making our dreams come true,” Alana Haim cheered.

The release kicks off Haim’s deli tour, where they will perform their new songs at iconic Jewish delis across the nation. The release was streamed online to raise money for The Bail Project, which prevents incarceration and assists those who cannot afford bail. 

The sisters, who are proud supporters of Israel and originally went by the band name “The Bagel Bitches,” have developed a cult following among Jewish listeners, particularly Jewish women.

“Women in Music Pt. III” is poised to be Haim’s most successful album yet. It has already spiked to number one on the iTunes charts, a first for the group. While trending on Twitter, the band received rave reviews from The New York Times, Pitchfork and Rolling Stone. The fact that the album was initially supposed to be released  in April, but was delayed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, has not hampered the trio’s success.

The sisters performed in the booths, playing an assortment of drums, guitars and keyboards, along with saxophonist Henry Solomon. After opening with the song “Summer Girl,” Haim took a celebratory shot, followed by a couple of tequila-induced coughs. “​Can we buy you guys a shot? We’re in the dining room,” said customer Jaimie Ramos, who was eating in the deli’s adjacent room.

“This is a very full circle moment,” said bassist Este Haim. “We had our first show at Canters in 2000.” Alana responded, “I don’t know how they let us play here. I was seven or eight!”

“I remember I had butterfly clips.” Danielle Haim chimed in. Reminiscing over their childhood sparkly jeans and inhaling the fumes of fresh pastrami, Haim were right at home. 

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