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A Bisl Torah – Spring Forward

We are reminded that when one physically and mentally springs forward, there’s always a chance of falling.
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March 14, 2024
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We have reached the season of changing the clocks. This time, springing forward. Daylight stretches, gifting us chirping birds and welcoming rays of the sun. But we are also reminded that when one physically and mentally springs forward, there’s always a chance of falling.

Falling is a universal, natural fear. Applying for jobs, testing out and repairing of relationships, taking risks, speaking up, stepping outside of our comfort zone. All examples of attempting to spring forward. All examples where we might fall in the process.

Purim is around the corner. The holiday that commemorates a story beginning one way and ending another. The Jews were expecting downfall and through deliberate steps of springing forward, changed the script. By the end, with Esther’s courage and Mordecai’s determination, the Jews are victorious. The phenomenon is called “v’nahafoch hu.” Everything flipping over. Some might argue that nothing is in our control and falling is inevitable. Others might say, “v’nahafoch hu.” Change occurs when we are brave enough to let change begin with us.

Spring forward. You might fall.

But what if you don’t?

Shabbat shalom


Rabbi Nicole Guzik is senior rabbi at Sinai Temple. She can be reached at her Facebook page at Rabbi Nicole Guzik or on Instagram @rabbiguzik. For more writings, visit Rabbi Guzik’s blog section from Sinai Temple’s website.

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