fbpx

A Bisl Thanksgiving

On this Thanksgiving Shabbat, let’s push ourselves to thank those who rarely get a thank you
[additional-authors]
November 22, 2023
Kristen Prahl/Getty Images

In these frightening times, it may feel difficult to see our blessings.

And yet, the Jewish way is even through challenge and strife, we open our eyes and name the goodness that surrounds. Our minds are trained to flood with negativity. We are less adept to seeing and recognizing the helpers, the healers, the smilers, the embracers, the doers, the ones who were divinely inspired to rebuild this world.

On this Thanksgiving Shabbat, let’s push ourselves to thank those who rarely get a thank you. The examples are endless: the waiter at a favorite coffee shop, the nurse taking your vitals, maintenance workers, security guards, teachers…the list goes on and on. A thank you to a mentor for being there to listen. A thank you to a friend for offering a shoulder to lean upon.

We are known as Yehudim. Our matriarch Leah gave gratitude for her newborn son and called him, “Yehuda.” We carry a name that means “Thanks.”  At our core we are meant to be a blessing to the world and moreover, recognize whose light is rarely acknowledged.

May the blessings you offer the world help us to see goodness, joy, and peace in our time.

I give thanks for each of you.

Shabbat Shalom


Rabbi Nicole Guzik is senior rabbi at Sinai Temple. She can be reached at her Facebook page at Rabbi Nicole Guzik or on Instagram @rabbiguzik. For more writings, visit Rabbi Guzik’s blog section from Sinai Temple’s website.

Did you enjoy this article?
You'll love our roundtable.

Editor's Picks

Latest Articles

Are We Going to Stop for Lunch?

So far, the American Jewish community has been exceptional in its support for Israel. But there is a long road ahead, and the question remains: will we continue with this support?

More news and opinions than at a
Shabbat dinner, right in your inbox.

More news and opinions than at a Shabbat dinner, right in your inbox.

More news and opinions than at a Shabbat dinner, right in your inbox.