September 22, 2018

Rosner’s Torah Talk: Parshat Eikev with Rabbi Steven Abraham

Rabbi Steven Abraham is the Rabbi of Beth El Synagogue in Omaha, NE. Steven graduated from the rabbinical school at the Jewish Theological Seminary in May of 2011, where he also received a M.A. in Jewish Education. Prior to attending JTS, he earned his B.S. in Business Management from the University of Baltimore. Most recently Steven earned a Certificate for being part of the Inaugural Interfaith Families Engagement program at Hebrew College. 

In college and rabbinical school Steven was actively involved with USY as a group leader on multiple summer programs, including USY on Wheels and Summer in The City as well as staffing NATIV. Rabbi Abraham currently sits on multiple boards including the Boys and Girls Clubs of the Midlands and the national board for United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism. He is married to Shira J. Abraham, from Highland Park, IL. They have two children, Naama (7) and Leor (4).

In this Week’s Torah Portion – Parashat Ekev (Deuteronomy 7:12-11:25) – Moses continues his address to the people of Israel, promising them that they will prosper in the land of Israel if they obey God’s commandments. He reminds them of their sins, but stresses God’s forgiveness. Moses describes the land of Israel to the people, demands that they destroy the idols of its former dwellers, and warns them of thinking that their power and might, rather than the lord, have gotten them their wealth. Our discussion focuses on Moses’ retelling of the Golden Calf story and on the reasons behind God’s forgiveness toward the people of Israel.

 

 

Previous Torah Talks on Eikev

Rabbi Brad Hirshfield

Rabbi Robert Dobrusin

Rabbi William Hamilton

Rabbi Michael Beals

Rabbi Phillip Scheim

 

 

 

Rosner’s Torah-Talk: Parashat Ekev with Rabbi Philip Scheim

Out guest this week is Rabbi Philip Scheim of Toronto’s Beth David congregation. Rabbi Scheim is also the president of the Rabbinical Assembly. His career in the rabbinate began in 1981, when he was appointed Assistant Rabbi at Beth David B’nai Israel Beth Am. In August of 1984, Rabbi Scheim was officially designated Senior Rabbi of the congregation, and has continued to serve in that capacity ever since.

In this Week’s Torah Portion – Parashat Ekev (Deuteronomy 7:12-11:25) – Moses continues his address to the people of Israel, promising them that they will prosper in the land of Israel if they obey God’s commandments. He reminds them of their sins, but stresses God’s forgiveness. Moses describes the land of Israel to the people, demands that they destroy the idols of its former dwellers, and warns them of thinking that their power and might, rather than the lord, have gotten them their wealth. Our discussion focuses on Moses’ retelling of the Golden Calf story and on the reasons behind God’s forgivness toward the people of Israel.

 

Our Past discussions of Parashat Ekev:

Rabbi William Hamilton on the differences between the two versions of the story about the Golden Calf.

Rabbi Robert Dobrusin on the importance of allowing our faith to grow with us and adapt to different circumstances in our lives

Rabbi Brad Hirschfield on the conditional and unconditional aspects of God’s covenant with Israel

A Portion of Parshat Ekev

Moses says to the people of Israel: “When you reach the Land of Israel, you will have plenty of food. You will have gold and silver. You will have fine houses to live in. Take care not to forget God, who brought you out of Egypt and through the dangerous desert.”

Imagine that you have worked hard on a science project. You got a lot of help from your parents. They bought you the materials and helped you type the information on the computer. Your cousin helped you build the model. The librarian told you what books to read. Finally, you bring your science project to school, and you win first prize. You get all the praise. Sometimes it’s easier to think: “I did this all by myself.” But now is the time to remember all the people who helped you get to this point. In the same way, the people of Israel must not forget who it was who brought them to the Land of Milk and Honey.