fbpx
Thursday, November 26, 2020

Sculpting a New Life

Print This Article

Martin Sturman, 86

Since retiring from his law practice of 39 years in 1998, Martin Sturman has had the opportunity to indulge in an artistic passion: sculpting.

Walking through an art gallery during a skiing trip in Colorado, Sturman was intrigued by the stainless steel sculptures he saw and decided to learn how to sculpt. Today, Sturman, who lives with his wife, Sara, in Westlake Village, maintains an art studio in Oxnard. 

Sturman was still practicing law when he came across the art gallery in Vail. “I had a client who had a metal fabrication shop,” he said. “They were kind enough to let me come over after work. They gave me scrap metal and torches and some instruction, and the night crew sort of adopted me and I learned how to sculpt in steel. When I felt I had learned enough, I opened up my own studio, Martin Sturman Steel Sculptures.” 

In 2010, the Capital Steel & Wire company named Sturman one of the “Top 10 Steel Sculptors of Our Time.” His sculptures have been profiled in multiple newspapers and magazines.

Aside from sculpting, Sturman also enjoys hiking three mornings a week with a group called the Heartbreak Hiking Fools at various trails around Los Angeles. 

In 2010, the Capital Steel & Wire company named Sturman one of the “Top 10 Steel Sculptors of Our Time.”

“I started hiking in the Westlake Village area with a wonderful group of people [from] all walks of life,” he said. “All religions [and backgrounds]; engineers, lawyers, doctors, everything. I’d never hiked before. I started hiking at age 65. I’m now 86 and still hiking. I am the oldest and the slowest.” 

Born to observant parents in Chicago, Sturman moved to Los Angeles in 1961.

“I grew up in a kosher household … primarily because my grandparents maintained [keeping] kosher,” Sturman said, but today he no longer considers himself religious. He does not, however, eat pork, and he attends High Holy Day services and fasts on Yom Kippur. 

Sturman and his wife also enjoy traveling and recently returned from a trip to Washington, D.C., and France. His favorite places to travel are Kauai in Hawaii and Paris, even though “I don’t speak French at all,” he joked. 

He added that he enjoys “being [in different places], seeing the history, museums [and] art.” He’s excited about his upcoming cruise to Alaska in August. 

Never one to slow down, Sturman also plays golf and takes ukulele lessons at a senior center in Thousand Oaks. “At the moment, I’m terrible,” he said. And even though he’s currently facing a major challenge as a cancer patient, Sturman is intent to live life to the fullest. “You have to go forward,” he said. “I don’t think of doing it any other way.” 

With three step-grandchildren, and a fourth on the way, Sturman’s advice to those younger than him is: “Don’t be too concerned about yourself. Be more open and empathetic to others.”

He added, “I don’t know what my next adventure will be, but I’m certainly open to it. I can’t complain, I’ve been and am very lucky. Life has been good.”  

Did you enjoy this article?

You'll love our roundtable.

Enjoyed this article?

You'll love our roundtable.

Select list(s) to subscribe to


By submitting this form, you are consenting to receive marketing emails from: Jewish Journal, 3250 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA, 90010, http://www.jewishjournal.com. You can revoke your consent to receive emails at any time by using the SafeUnsubscribe® link, found at the bottom of every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact

Giving Season

Pandemic Has Altered The Rules of Fundraising

This article originally appeared in The New York Jewish Week The impact of the Covid-19 pandemic is massive, costing hundreds of thousands of lives and...

One Form of Giving: Spreading Kindness

“It started as a spreadsheet, a very basic spreadsheet,” Elana Sichel, a recent graduate of University of Maryland says. She and Hadassah Raskas, a U Penn rising senior, are the co-founders of Corona Connects, an initiative that pairs volunteers with organizations needing the extra hands during this chaotic time of living through the Coronavirus pandemic. The idea originated in a strong desire to be of service, stemming from their observant upbringing. Raskas explains, “I think it really was our Jewish values that really created this thing inside of us…it’s so deeply ingrained.”

Two Phrases That May Explain Why Giving Comes Naturally

Two women pass a beggar on the street. They have the same income and expenses. The first weeps at the suffering of the beggar and gives him $5 out of the goodness of her heart. The second notices but rushes past. Later in the day, however, she feels compelled because of her religious beliefs and returns to give the beggar $100. Who is the better person? Why are Jews so generous?

Latest Articles

Rosner’s Torah Talk: Parshat Vayetze with Tzvia Rubens

Tzvia Rubens, of Hebrew Union in Ohio, is our guest this week, and we discuss Parshat Vayetze which begins when Jacob leaves Canaan and journeys to Charan. On...

The Lucas Project: How You Can Help Boys with ALD

Lucas' Story When Lucas was 3 months old we were notified that he tested...

This Thanksgiving, I’m Grateful to Councilmember David E. Ryu

I dedicate this column to thanking Councilmember David Ryu of Los Angeles’s fourth district.

A Time to Redefine Thanksgiving and A Time to Reclaim It

A year ago, we were in a dilemma about what to do with too much and too many. This year, our dilemma is what to do, period.

Georgia On My Mind

Why has Biden not gone again to Georgia?

Satirical Semite: Learning to Be English

After 10 years of living in Los Angeles, I must now relearn how to be English.

Haley Calls On Trump Admin to Release Report on Number of Palestinian Refugees

Nikki Haley called on the administration to declassify a report detailing the current number of Palestinian refugees who are receiving aid from the UNRWA.

Love Like Jacob – a poem for Torah portion Vateze

So Jacob worked for Rachel seven years, but they appeared to him like a few days because of his love for her.          ...

Professor On Leave After Tweeting ‘COVID-19 Is Another Jewish Revolution’

A professor at a university in Michigan has been placed on administrative leave after the student newspaper unearthed a series of his anti-Semitic tweets.

Legacy Charitable Foundation Distributes 162 Food Boxes for Thanksgiving

The annual Thanksgiving Turkey Brigade looked a little different this year.

Culture

Breathing New Life Into A Thanksgiving Pumpkin Tradition

Why stick with the ordinary pumpkin when you can accessorize into a whole line of winter squashes with far more panache?

MOTs Score Grammy Nominations

This year’s nominees include several Members of the Tribe, including Jerry Seinfeld, Tiffany Haddish, Rachel Maddow and Spike Jonze, in categories that reflect their particular talents.

Donations of Appreciated Stock Unlock Charitable Currency, Bring Fulfillment

A few years ago, the Jewish Community Foundation of Los Angeles (The Foundation) ran an advertisement with an attention-grabbing headline: To open a charitable...

Giving Thanks for the Yummiest Holiday Ever

Little 7 year old me arrived in Los Angeles from Casablanca one week before Halloween. My uncle took me to get a costume and...

An Unconventional Holiday Season

Last Passover, my mom, my sister and I sat at our kitchen table and ate thick slices of New York pizza. “We are bad Jews,”...

Latest Articles
Latest

Rosner’s Torah Talk: Parshat Vayetze with Tzvia Rubens

Tzvia Rubens, of Hebrew Union in Ohio, is our guest this week, and we discuss Parshat Vayetze which begins when Jacob leaves Canaan and journeys to Charan. On...

The Lucas Project: How You Can Help Boys with ALD

Lucas' Story When Lucas was 3 months old we were notified that he tested...

This Thanksgiving, I’m Grateful to Councilmember David E. Ryu

I dedicate this column to thanking Councilmember David Ryu of Los Angeles’s fourth district.

A Time to Redefine Thanksgiving and A Time to Reclaim It

A year ago, we were in a dilemma about what to do with too much and too many. This year, our dilemma is what to do, period.

Georgia On My Mind

Why has Biden not gone again to Georgia?

Hollywood

‘Oslo’ Drama Underway from Steven Spielberg, Marc Platt

Steven Spielberg, Mark Platt and David Litvak are bringing the J.T. Rogers’ Tony Award-winning play “Oslo,” about the 1993 Israeli-Palestinian Peace Accords, to HBO....

‘Valley of Tears’ Tells Harrowing Stories of the 1973 Yom Kippur War

As Yom Kippur began in 1973, attacks by Syria and Egypt took Israel by surprise, launching a 19-day war in which more than 10,000...

Sophia Loren Plays a Holocaust Survivor in ‘The Life Ahead’

In her first feature film since “Nine” in 2009, screen legend Sophia Loren plays a Holocaust survivor who takes in motherless children in “The...

Podcasts

David L. Graizbord: The New Zionists

Shmuel Rosner and David L. Graizbord discuss his new book, The New Zionists: Young American Jews, Jewish National Identity, and Israel. David Graizbord is an...

Pandemic Times Episode 107: Some deep reflections before Thanksgiving

New David Suissa Podcast Every Tuesday and Friday. A conversation with Danielle Ames Spivak, CEO of American Friends of the Israel Philharmonic. How do we manage...

More news and opinions than at a Shabbat dinner, right in your inbox.

x