Recipe for marijuana cholent


Now that the states of Colorado and Washington have legalized the recreational use and commercial sale of marijuana for its residents 21 years or older, there are all sorts of way to get creative in incorporating the new legal substance with Jewish edibles. Here's a recipe for “Happy Cholent” that one seasoned “cook” shared with the JTA — he guarantees it will uplift your Shabbat spirits.

HAPPY CHOLENT

Ingredients:
3 1/2 grams dried marijuana
1/2 cup olice oil
1 onion
3 cloves fresh garlic
3 potatoes
2 sweet potatoes
1 cup barley
1 can baked beans
2 teaspoons salt
1 tablespoon paprika
3 tablespoons Frank's hot sauce
1/4 cup ketchup
1 piece flanken with bones
2 cups water
 
Preparation:
Heat oil over low flame. Grind marijuana by sprinkling with hand or by using grinder. Add to oil, keep on low flame for 20 minutes or until weed turns light brown. Pour content through sifter, throw out weed residue, and pour oil into bottom of crock pot, put on high high setting. Saute onion into oil, add rest of ingredients, cook on low setting overnight. Serves 8-10; side effects will take 20-30 minutes to kick in if served hot.

A young chef’s guide to the Rosh Hashanah meal


Considering the history of the Jewish people, the fact that Jews are still celebrating the High Holy Days today is a miracle in itself. Strong traditions and lasting rituals have enabled Jews to survive the most threatening periods of history. With the freedoms we have as modern American Jews, it makes sense that we use these same traditions and rituals to enjoy holidays to the fullest. As a chef and registered foodie, the best way I know to relish in the upcoming holidays is by making really delicious food. My plan for this year is to make a multi-course feast that pays homage to great Jewish eating traditions while at the same time represents me and my life as a Jewish chef in Los Angeles.

Watching friends and family nod their heads and smile as they eat the food you have prepared is unbelievably soul-satisfying. It is a great feeling to know that the meal you cooked has enriched the High Holy Day experience for those you love. Great food is part of the equation in making a great meal, but the experience is made complete when you also have time to enjoy the company of friends and family. In order to accomplish this, I turn to the motto of my alma mater, the Culinary Institute of America, which states, “Preparation is everything.” Creating a strategy and timeline for a feast at home for guests will enable you as the cook to make great food and eat it too. Mise en place is a cooking term that means “to put into place.” It is what every chef must learn in order to master the craft of cooking. Mise en place represents the prep work done in advance of a meal and the strategy for serving it. If you are going to make the High Holy Day meal of a lifetime and still enjoy eating it, you must first focus on making a prep plan as to when the components of the meal will be made, and a strategy for how to serve the meal. This is what I will discuss as I go through my menu for the holidays.

My first course is Olive Oil Poached Sardine Fillets and Fried Heads With Lemon and Parsley Chips. Serving the fish heads, or the “rosh,” for the holidays has traditionally been a symbol for the fact that we have reached the head of the year, and also the head of life, rather than the tail. Some Jews serve whole fish so there will be a head on the table during dinner. Using this tradition as inspiration, I decided to serve fried sardine heads along with the fillets. Even though this is the first course, it should be last in the prep schedule. Ideally, purchase the fish as close to serving the meal as possible, so that it is at its freshest. The sardines should be cleaned and cooked shortly before serving. Last, they should be eaten immediately after cooking to maximize flavor.

The next course is Chilled Honey-Cucumber Soup. My wife and I own the M.O. Eggrolls food truck in Los Angeles. We are coming to the end of our first summer in business, and it has been a fantastic adventure. Along with the excitement and joy of running our truck comes the fact that we have been hot since April. Between the cooking equipment and the warm California sunshine, our truck heats up. This year, while I am relaxing and enjoying our High Holy Day feast, I want to eat something cool. Cucumber is a cooling ingredient and when paired with honey in a soup takes on a familiar homey sweetness that many Jews would associate with Rosh Hashanah. Along with being tasty, this chilled soup relieves a tremendous amount of stress, because everything can be made the day before, and to serve, it is simply poured into bowls and garnished.

Most chefs begin their careers working “the line.” This refers to the line of equipment in restaurant kitchens, where cooks are divided by stations and are responsible for cooking different items on the restaurant’s menu. Typically, stations are divided by the equipment each cook is responsible for, such as grill, sauté, fry, etc. This is the training ground for all chefs. You must prepare a variety of dishes as quickly as possible, while maintaining the highest-quality standards. The only way to survive the line is with impeccable mise en place.

Approaching a family meal at home as a line cook will enable you to cook a great meal and then have time to enjoy the company of your friends and family.  For the main course, I am serving Apples and Honey Chicken along with Smashed Sweet Potatoes and a Warm Kale-and-Fennel Slaw. Braised chicken is ideal for serving large groups hot food that is tender, moist and flavorful. I prepare all of the ingredients for the chicken the day before. The day of the dinner, I begin to cook the chicken in the early afternoon and let it cook slowly until I am ready to serve it.

The ingredients for the slaw are also prepared the day before, and I create a kit for the dressing. Kitting a recipe is a pillar of the Culinary Institute of America’s curriculum. It means that I have the ingredients for a recipe portioned and organized so that I can quickly assemble the dish when needed. By kitting the dressing, I am able to easily prepare the slaw near the time of serving it without stress. The last component of the entrée is the smashed sweet potatoes. Mashed preparations, like potatoes or squash, can be held in a heat-resistant bowl, covered in plastic wrap on top of a double boiler for long periods of time without compromising its quality. I prepare the sweet potatoes before my family and friends arrive and hold them over a double boiler until I am ready to serve them. Limiting the number of steps I have to take after family has arrived allows me time during the meal to sit with them and enjoy the food and their company.

After a great feast, I prefer a dessert that is petite and pairs well with fine coffee and schnapps. This year I am serving Honey-Olive Oil Cookies with Thyme and Fleur de Sel. The olive oil gives the cookie a biscuit-like texture that pleasantly dries the mouth and creates a craving for something to drink. Relaxing at the end of a holiday meal with the people I love and sharing cookies and schnapps is a tradition that helps me celebrate Jewish life. I hope that you will feel empowered to continue developing your own great Jewish culinary traditions for your friends and family.

I wish you all a delicious and sweet new year. L’shanah tovah!

Shopping for Jews? Clean Up on Aisle 5


Anyone who walked into Albertsons in Los Altos on a recent Sunday would have run right into Margie Pomerantz’s Passover table.

There she sat, next to the kosher food display right inside the supermarket’s front entrance. A big handwritten sign reading “Passover in the Aisles” hung down from her table, on which lay piles of Passover recipe books, haggadahs and other holiday resources.

Pomerantz and her fellow volunteers from Congregation Beth David, a nearby Conservative synagogue, were out looking for Jews. In a supermarket. Unaffiliated Jews, if possible, but they weren’t being picky.

They handed out information and collected names. Someone from the synagogue will call later with an invitation to a Shabbat service or other Jewish program.

Scenes like this, with a nonaggressive method of doing outreach, are being repeated across the United States this week and next, in dozens of communities.

It’s all part of Passover in the Aisles, an initiative conceived of by the Jewish Outreach Institute (JOI).

Some Jewish groups have been doing this kind of outreach for a decade or more, but the biggest push seems to have come in the past three to five years.

It is based on the idea of “public space Judaism” — taking programs out to where people are instead of waiting for them to walk into a synagogue or JCC.

“If we wait for people to come to programs within the four walls of our communal institutions, we’ll be waiting a long time,” says Rabbi Kerry Olitzky, executive director of the JOI, which provides guidance for such programs.

Passover is a particularly good time for this kind of outreach, Olitzky says, both because it is one of the most widely celebrated holidays among all Jews, even the unaffiliated, and because it requires people to go to the grocery store to buy matzah and other Passover products.

Olitzky says his outreach model has a lot in common with Chabad’s street outreach, which he admires. But he says, what “makes ours different is we are less intrusive, less discriminating. We don’t ask, are you Jewish?”

“It’s important that Judaism be shared passionately in public spaces,” Olitzky says. “That’s what Chabad does, and that’s what we do.”

Beth David’s assistant rabbi, Aaron Schonbrun, went to a JOI conference last year and says he was astounded at the concept of liberal Jews doing this kind of outreach. It wasn’t what he learned in rabbinical seminary.

“We learned at the conference that you can’t expect people to just write that check to the federation, especially not my generation,” the 29-year-old rabbi says. “We talked about how to engage Jews in Judaism, not Reform or Conservative or Orthodox, but Judaism.”

This is the second year Beth David has done Passover in the Aisles. By 3 p.m. on Sunday, after three hours in the store, there are just nine cards filled out at the Los Altos Albertsons, an hour south of San Francisco. But the volunteers have talked to dozens of shoppers.

One young woman who filled out a card was Galit Azulay, newly arrived from Israel with her husband, who is studying for his doctorate in the area.

“We’re here to buy food for the seder,” she says, adding that the couple aren’t affiliated and don’t plan to be.

She didn’t pick up any of the information, but entered the raffle for a seder plate.

Carol Greenberg also stopped by the table. A member of a local Reform congregation, she congratulated the Beth David volunteers on their outreach efforts. “I’m so excited to see you here,” she exclaims. Greenberg picked up a copy of their recipe book.

“I find that congregations’ recipes are much better than books,” she says. She also took one of the children’s haggadahs, which she plans to give to her newborn niece. “It’ll be a nice gift from her aunt, her first haggadah.”

Store manager Aide Garcia says she couldn’t be happier to host the event. “It increases our business a lot,” she confides. “It’s a way to promote our kosher food.”

The JCC in Columbus, Ohio did its first Passover outreach in a Wild Oats supermarket in 2003. They chose a new neighborhood in the northwest part of the city, an area where young, professional Jews have been moving, to improve their chances of reaching the unaffiliated.

“In the core community, we have an affiliation rate of 90 percent, versus 20 percent in the northwest, where most of the growth is happening,” says Lindsay Folkerth, outreach director for the JCC’s J-Link project. J-Link is a community outreach program created two years ago by the local federation following a demographic study of the Columbus Jewish community by JOI.

Seattle Rabbi Dov Gartenberg says his congregants “thought it was a little strange” when he set up a Passover outreach table in a local supermarket more than 10 years ago. That was before he heard about the JOI program.

He now runs food booths at a Whole Foods store before Passover and Rosh Hashanah, and has teamed up with a popular local chef to offer tastes of Jewish holiday foods. This month they’re offering a different charoset each week, along with recipes.

Gartenberg uses the tastings as a teaching opportunity. “As they taste, I say, this is what this food symbolizes, and it becomes a basis for conversation.”

 

Recipes Add Spice to New Party Trend


Although today’s bar mitzvah parties are often as elaborate as yesterday’s weddings, there’s a new trend on the horizon — a, noisy, jubilant oneg Shabbat and lunch directly after the ceremony, and a quiet, intimate dinner at home for a few close friends and family at night.

The reasons are strictly practical.

Instead of watching their parents spend exorbitant amounts of money on an elaborate Saturday night party, many bar mitzvahs are imploring that they’d rather steer the funds in another direction.

Molly wants a horse. Sammy wants to spend a summer in Israel. Tiara has her eye on Yale and plans to deposit the funds into her college account.

It’s actually a win-win situation for everyone. The stress of planning the fancy party evaporates; those closest to the event have an intimate setting to revel in their pride and joy’s accomplishment; and, at 13, the celebrant gets the satisfaction of making the first big decision as an adult and enjoying the fruits of this sagacity.

And just because the cost isn’t astronomical, doesn’t mean the setting won’t be inviting and the meal delicious. For the occasion, we’ve come up with a creative, festive menu — easy to prepare in advance, healthful and energizing.

Many of these recipes are from dietitian and chef Cheryl Forberg, who always has an eye toward health, while preparing dishes that delight the senses. The delicious almond nut torte is from L.A. chef Toribio Prado.

Edamame Guacamole with Stone-ground Corn Chips

Adapted from “Stop the Clock Cooking” by Cheryl Forberg (Avery/Penguin Putnam, 2003).

1 cup shelled edamame (fresh, green soy beans)

2 cloves garlic, peeled and minced

1 to 2 teaspoons chopped chipotle chili, with seeds

1 tablespoon fresh lime juice, divided

2 large ripe avocados

1/4 cup stemmed, roughly chopped cilantro

1/2 cup finely chopped skinned tomatoes

2 tablespoons finely chopped white onion

Sea salt and cayenne pepper to taste

Corn Chips

One 9.5-ounce package stone-ground corn tortillas (12 count)

Olive oil cooking spray

Olive oil as needed

Salt to taste (optional)

Garnish

1 tablespoon chopped fresh cilantro

For guacamole, cook edamame in salted boiling water for five minutes. Drain and cool to room temperature.

Combine edamame, garlic, chili and 2 teaspoons lime juice in a food processor bowl. Process until mixture is very smooth, about three minutes. Set aside.

Peel and seed avocados; place in medium mixing bowl. Add remaining 1 teaspoon lime juice and mash with a fork, leaving small chunks. Fold in edamame mixture, cilantro, tomatoes and onion. Season with salt and pepper. Garnish with cilantro.

For chips, preheat oven to 400 F. Stack the 12 tortillas and cut them into eighths. Spread the tortilla chips in a single layer on baking sheets, drizzle with olive oil, and sprinkle with salt, if desired.

Bake chips until they are crisp and slightly golden, about 10 minutes. Transfer cooked chips to a basket lined with paper napkins.

Makes 2 1/2 cups.

Tomato-Ginger Bisque

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 small minced onion

2 tablespoons minced shallot

1 tablespoon peeled and sliced fresh ginger

2 cloves garlic, peeled and minced

2 pounds ripe tomatoes, peeled and coarsely chopped

1 teaspoon fresh thyme, crumbled

1 small bay leaf

1 1/4 cup vegetable or chicken broth

1/2 cup white wine

1 tablespoon lemon juice

Pinch of saffron threads

Salt and pepper to taste

1/4 cup fresh basil leaves, cut in chiffonade for garnish

(The chiffonade cut is done by rolling the leaves lengthwise and slicing crosswise into thin slivers.)

Heat olive oil in a 2-quart saucepan over medium heat. Add onion, shallot, garlic and ginger. Sauté until translucent, stirring occasionally, about seven minutes.

Add tomatoes, thyme, bay leaf and saffron. Simmer until mixture begins to thicken, about four minutes more.

Add broth, wine and lemon juice. Bring to a boil. Immediately reduce heat and simmer 20 minutes. Remove slices of ginger.

Puree soup in a food processor until smooth. Or, if you prefer, serve it chunky. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Garnish with basil.

This recipe can be prepared the day before. When re-heating it, make sure the flame is low so that liquid doesn’t evaporate.

Makes four servings.

Egyptian Eggplant Salad

The simple earthiness of this large salad melds the flavors of the East and the West.

Salad

2 large eggplants

1 1/2 heads romaine lettuce, washed, dried and torn into bite-size pieces

1 medium red bell pepper, cut into fine dice

1/2 medium green bell pepper, cut into fine dice

1 English cucumber, peeled and cut into fine dice

1 cup chopped green onions (green and white parts)

1/2 cup chopped fresh Italian parsley, without stems

1/2 cup chopped fresh mint, without stems

Dressing

2 tablespoons minced garlic

1/4 cup fresh lemon juice

1 tablespoon ground cumin

1 1/2 teaspoons salt

1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes or 1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper

1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil

Salt and pepper to taste

Preheat oven to 350 F. Position rack in middle of oven.

Rinse off eggplant. Cut off stem end. Pierce skin with a fork. Lightly coat a 10- to 15-inch baking sheet with olive oil spray. Place eggplant on baking sheet and bake for about 40 minutes, turning it three or four times to roast evenly.

Remove from oven. When cool enough to handle, peel and discard eggplant skin. Remove most of the seeds and cut into chunks.

Place lettuce into a large mixing bowl. Add peppers, cucumber, green onions, parsley, mint and eggplant.

For dressing, mash garlic with lemon juice until smooth. Add cumin, salt and red pepper flakes or cayenne. Whisk oil in a thin stream until incorporated. There will be about 3/4 cup of dressing.

Pour 1/4 cup of the dressing over salad and toss well. Season with salt and pepper. Pass remaining dressing separately. This salad may be assembled the night before, including tossing it with the dressing, which gives it time for the flavors to meld.

Makes eight servings.

Grilled Chicken with Walnut and Pomegranate Sauce

Note: Pomegranate syrup (also called pomegranate molasses or pomegranate concentrate) can be found in Middle Eastern markets and in some supermarkets.

Walnut and Pomegranate Sauce

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 cup finely chopped yellow onion

1/2 teaspoon saffron or turmeric

1/4 teaspoon cinnamon

1/4 teaspoon nutmeg

1/4 teaspoon pepper

2 cups fat-free chicken or vegetable broth

1/2 cup chopped walnuts

1/4 cup pomegranate syrup

1 tablespoon sorghum syrup or dark honey

Salt and pepper to taste

Grilled Chicken

6 (3-ounce) boneless, skinless chicken breast halves

1 tablespoon olive oil

Salt and pepper to taste

Garnish

1/4 cup chopped fresh Italian parsley, without stems

1/2 cup pomegranate seeds (optional)

To prepare sauce, heat oil in large sauté pan over medium heat. Add onion and cook until light golden brown, about eight minutes. Add spices and cook until fragrant, about one minute.

Add 1 1/2 cups of the chicken broth and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low and simmer for five minutes. Remove from heat.

Place walnuts in food processor bowl and process until very finely ground. Add remaining 1/2 cup chicken broth, the pomegranate syrup and sorghum syrup.

Process until sauce is creamy and smooth. Carefully add the hot broth and onion mixture. Puree again until smooth.

Return sauce to sauté pan. Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer until consistency thickens, about three minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Keep warm.

Preheat charcoal grill. Brush chicken lightly with olive oil. Arrange chicken on a rack set about six inches over glowing coals. Grill about four minutes on each side, or until just cooked through (or on a hot, ridged grill pan over medium-high heat). Season with salt and pepper. Serve hot.

Serve each chicken breast with 2 tablespoons of sauce and garnish with chopped parsley and pomegranate seeds (if available.) Pass extra sauce separately.

Makes six servings.

Tezpishtl (Turkish almond nut torte)

From Los Angeles chef Toribio Prado

Syrup

2 cups sugar

2 cups water

2 teaspoons lemon juice

Cake

5 eggs

1 cup sugar

1/4 cup corn or sunflower oil

Juice and zest of 1 orange

2 teaspoons ground cinnamon

1 1/4 cups fine matzah cake meal

1 1/4 cups finely chopped blanched almonds.

To make syrup, mix sugar and water together in a saucepan; bring to boil. Add lemon juice; simmer over low heat for 10 minutes. Cool.

To make cake, beat eggs until frothy; add sugar and continue to beat until golden and well mixed. Add other ingredients, one at a time; stir into batter.

Pour into oiled and floured 13 x 9 x 2-inch cake pan; bake at 350 F for 30 minutes. Test for doneness with a toothpick.

Remove cake from oven; pour cooled syrup over it. Let cake stand for two hours before serving to allow syrup to be absorbed.

Makes one cake, about 18 pieces.

Honey and Marinated Fig Topping

1/2 pound dried white figs

1 bottle port wine

1/2 cup sugar

1 teaspoon lemon juice

1 cup honey

Pinch of nutmeg

Pinch of cinnamon

Wash figs and dry well. Place figs and port wine in large bowl; marinate overnight. Drain figs; reserve wine.

In large saucepan add sugar, lemon juice, honey. Simmer, being careful not to burn sugar.

Raise flame to medium. Add reserved port wine, cinnamon and nutmeg. Reduce by half and add figs. Stir well. Serve with torte.

 

On Shabbat, Stay Cool as a Cucumber


Miami is hot. In the summer, even sometimes in the winter, the air arches off the streets radiating heat circles that bend but do not break as you walk though them, slowly, slowly.

My grandparents, Oma and Opa, bought an apartment in Miami Beach that my family of eight piled into for visits. It was a small unit with one bedroom and a galley kitchen that emptied into a simply furnished dining and living area. But the center courtyard, where each of these tiny apartments faced, was opened to the sky and bathed in Florida sun. And the beach and the Atlantic Ocean were only two lazy blocks away.

So when we got our driver’s licenses, my brothers and sisters and I drove ourselves from our Atlanta home to Miami. Opa would find us a little room close by so we could run around all day and night and touch base for meals or chats in between. Oma, a fastidious and controlled woman, loved our visits. Her serious and beautiful face would break into a child’s laugh when my sister and I shared stories about the boys we met while strolling the beaches and dancing at nightclubs. And Opa, a sparkling and wise man, managed to find us once every day on the beach. From a distance, we would see him coming, wearing his summer suit and beige cap and carrying a brown paper bag holding our carefully prepared lunches of cold chicken, homemade challah, and light sugar cookies.

But for Saturday lunches, we came to them. Since they were Orthodox and didn’t use appliances on the Sabbath, Oma had an array of simple but wonderful dishes she prepared in advance to be eaten cold. In the Miami heat, her Cucumber Dill Salad was one of my favorites. It was always served in a rectangular glass container with gold flower foiling on the sides. The pale green slices were always perfectly thin and even. And when we sat together around the dim unlit dining table — me sunburned and tired from the day before — her cool salad felt like a mint mist, a slow fan. Outside their window, the palm leaves baked yellow in the sun, but inside, eating pale green cucumber circles with my Oma and Opa, I was filled by a moment where there was nothing I’d rather do.

Oma’s Cucumber Dill Salad

My grandmother marinated her cucumbers in distilled white vinegar, but I replaced it with rice vinegar for a less sharp taste. She also cooked with a very light hand when it came to spices, so play with the seasonings until it is perfect and refreshing for you.

2 large cucumbers (approximately four cups sliced)

2 tablespoons rice vinegar

1 tablespoon water

1/8 teaspoon salt

1/8 teaspoon sugar

Pinch of white pepper

Fresh dill (approximately 1-2 tablespoons)

Peel skin off cucumbers and slice thinly. Arrange in long rectangular sealable container. In small bowl whisk vinegar, water, salt, sugar and pepper. (Season to your taste, but don’t add too much salt as it draws liquid from the cucumbers.) Pour vinegar mixture over cucumbers and mix well. Cut fresh dill and sprinkle over cucumbers. Close container, toss to mix and refrigerate overnight to marinate. Toss again before serving.

Serves five as a side dish.