November 21, 2018

Letters to the editor: BDS, Independence for special needs adults, Holocaust survivors and more

Emotion Not Enough in Age of Information

Any anti-BDS movement that does not address the occupation and settlement expansion in some way is doomed to failure (“Hillary Clinton Has the Answer to BDS,” July 10). We cannot assume students are stupid or anti-Semitic when they look for a way to put weight behind their criticism of Israel.

Give them a reason to accept Israeli policies in the West Bank or say goodbye to the next generation.

If you want to convince American college students that the occupation is just, both in its geographical scope and its policies, venting anger at Palestinians will not be enough. Americans are already ashamed of how we treated Native Americans and African-Americans. What fuels the BDS movement is that Israelis are not ashamed of how they treat Palestinians.

Marshall Fuss via jewishjournal.com

Our Pain Is Not God’s Plan

No, Rabbi Naomi Levy is not the only one who had a problem with the eulogy (“Obama’s Eulogy: Stirring Words, Disturbing Theology,” July 10). Thank you for her comforting words that elucidate a theology that makes sense to all of us who believe in a caring and compassionate God, one who expects us to be partners in preventing evil and in perfecting the world.  

Joshua Karlin via email

For completeness, Levy could have noted that not only Jewish religious people but also agnostics, atheists and other religious people can easily disagree with President Barack Obama’s expressed theology, which is based on what he believed were God’s intentions.

Marc Jacobson via email

Invest in Independence

I am an autistic man who disagrees with Michelle Wolf about extra funding for the regional center (“Will the Special Session Help People With Special Needs?” July 10). In her article, Wolf mentions how difficult it is for parents to even get a caseworker to call them back. I have found it virtually impossible. I have had three caseworkers who refused to provide help and/or treat me with dignity. They do not advocate or protect my rights. Instead, they make money for themselves. Seventy-five percent of my vendor providers did not provide the help that I needed because they knew they would still get paid for doing nothing.

Several months ago, Wolf wrote an article about how the Department of Developmental Services is beginning a self-determination program for clients of the regional center. I tried to get into the test program but failed. This program will allow the client to bypass all the red tape that goes on with caseworkers. This is what we need. It will save taxpayers money, and clients will get the services they need. Once the regional centers stop wasting money, our Legislature could provide extra money.

By the way, my current caseworker believes I am mentally retarded!

Mark Girard via email

Never Again, Never Forget

Thank you so much for writing and publishing the two recent World War II stories (“Survivor: Sidonia Lax,” “The Goodness Effect,” July 10). I burst into tears reading about the inhuman treatment of Sidonia Lax and her loved ones in Poland, and for how their happy lives became a living hell:  forced out of their homes, forced to hide, deportations, starvation, their cramped living conditions, parents and friends murdered, no clothes, freezing in winter and transferred to many prison camps. 

And for Sir Nicholas Winton, who saved almost 700 children in Czechoslovakia, evacuating them by train, their brutal living conditions in ghettos, parents desperate to get their children out, and parents left behind and murdered.

These stories (as do the other survivor stories) so moved me. We should never forget the horrific sufferings of those persecuted by Nazis.

May all their stories continue to be told. In this way, we honor them and keep their memories alive. 

Sharon Swan, Redondo Beach