October 15, 2019

Video

Jay Sanderson, President & CEO of the Jewish Federation of Greater Los Angeles visited with the Jewish Journal for a wide-ranging in-depth conversation.

Here are some of the highlights on the role of Federations and his vision for the future of Jewish life in Los Angeles.

The Jewish Journal thanks Jay and the JFLA for facilitating this conversation.

Cooking for Thanksgiving can be overwhelming! We are all very thankful for our moms.
Rivers, 49, told the Jewish Journal that Larry David's Saturday Night Live monologue was "so genius" amid controversy.
How to make your own Challahween (with a little help from mom).

Read a profile on Shoshana Bean here.

The Band:
Shoshana Bean – lead vocals
Luke Edgemon – backup vocals
Mario Jose – backup vocals
Jacob Scesney – sax
Adam Kubota – bass
Aaron McLendon – drums
Scott Bradlee – piano

Featuring: The Rebbetzin, Kosha Dillz, and more!

Written by Jordan Reimer, Jessica Schechter, Ronn Blitzer, Erez Cohen, Barry Bornstein, Arianna Schudrich, and JJ Weiss.

“Apple Baseball” scenes filmed by Greg Starr.

Video and Performance by Erez Cohen

Is this what the Red Sea looked like when the waters came rushing back after the Israelites had crossed?

Watch this flash flood from Israel’s Negev Desert as an empty riverbed comes roaring back to life.

So a rabbi and a former NBA star walk into a trade show…

Seriously though, Michigan rabbi (and JTA contributor) Jason Miller, actually did run into Shaquille O’Neal at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas last Tuesday.

Inspired by hip-hop mogul Russell Simmons‘ “Shabbat Shalom” closer at the end of an interview given at the show, and by an old TMZ video of Shaq wishing Jewish friends a “L’shana tova,” Miller decided to ask Shaq to recite some Hebrew phrases–on camera.

As Rabbi Miller noted on his blog, the basketball legend gladly obliged. Todah rabah Shaq!

Jewish Journal President David Suissa debates political author Peter Beinart spar about Israel in the debate of the year.

Moderated by Sinai Temple's Rabbi David Wolpe.

The Symposium on Preparedness for Mass Casualty Events is in commemoration of the 10th Yahrzeit of Dr. David Applebaum, who was the Director of the Emergency Room at Shaare Zedek Medical Center in Jerusalem. Dr. Applebaum and his daughter Nava were victims of a terror attack on the eve of Nava's wedding.

[For more coverage of the event, click here]

The Western Region, Am. Cmte. Shaare Zedek Medical Center in Jerusalem and Co-Chairmen, Dr. Eli Baron and Dr. Daniel Wohlgelernter are proud to sponsor such a timely and important Symposium featuring:

Moderator:

Peter Rosen MD — the 'Father' of Modern Emergency Medicine

Panelists:

William Begg, MD — Danbury Hospital, Connecticut (Sandy Hook Elementary School)

Joel Geiderman, MD — Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles

Bruce D. Logan, MD — NYU Downtown Hospital (WTC — 9/11)

Ofer Merin, MD — Deputy Director-General, Head of Emergency Hospital Preparedness for Mass Casualty at Shaare Zedek Medical Center in Jerusalem and Senior member of two IDF medical relief missions in Haiti and Japan

Richard Wolfe, MD — Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (Boston Marathon)

Special Guests:

Debra Applebaum

Israel Consul General David Siegel

Dr. Yitzhak Applebaum

Move over Adam Levine — you’re not the only sexy Jewish musician in the news this week. Yep, Jewish a cappella sensations The Maccabeats are back with a new Hanukkah single!

OK, so maybe it’s very wrong to call these sweetie pies sexy, but they are extremely cute, and they definitely know how to rock this adaptation of Ellie Goulding’s catchy and aptly titled “Burn.”

In the video, a modern and bloodless take on the story of Maccabees, if you will, a Nice Jewish Boy stands up to school bullies. Bonus: A warm and fuzzy Thanksgivukkah dinner scene. Enjoy!

The first official music video for Bob Dylan’s “Like a Rolling Stone” is making the rounds on the internet. And Dylan’s endorsement is only half the reason why.

The video, produced by media start-up Interlude, includes a novel interactive channel-tuning button, each channel mimicking a different cable channel or news program, featuring cameos by Drew Carey and a matzah-eating Danny Brown. The video was filmed under creative directorship of 27-year old Vania Heymann, an Israeli graduate of the Bezalel Arts school.

In just two years, Heymann’s video portfolio has grown from student film trailer about Yiddish-speaking hitman “Der Mentsh” to a digital shorts series on Eretz Nehederet (Israel’s Saturday Night Live), a Pepsi Max commercial and now a Bob Dylan music video — 48 years after the original release — with the artist’s blessing.

Seems as if Heymann isn’t pacing himself between achievements in digital advertising. As long as he doesn’t tire out, that could be a good development for digital media consumers and brands.

Yes, you read that correctly.

Perhaps the most bizarre production to use Thanksgivukkah as a muse is this music video, in which the band Buba Myses rocks out to a holiday-themed parody of the will.i.am/Britney Spears song “Scream and Shout.”

The one thing that separates this video from the ever-growing number of Jewish parodies on YouTube: the band members are Hasidic. They’re also puppets. The band name Buba Myses, Yiddish for “grandma tales,” is also a play on the Hebrew word buba, which means puppet.

But as much as the presentation is impressive, I’ve gotta say that the character I identify with most is the bewildered guest. If I came to a Thanksgiving dinner only to be greeted by a bunch of Orthodox puppets, I’d be pretty confused, too.

Because, obviously, what the world needs is another jokey Thanksgivukkah tribute — and another spin on New Zealand teen sensation Lorde’s ridiculously catchy tune “Royals.”

Not nearly as over-the-top funny as the last parody, but we’ll take it.

 

 

If you have 10 minutes to spare, check out Drake’s short film/video “Worst Behavior.”

It’s packed with shots of Memphis, f-bombs, and cameos from Drake’s dad Dennis Graham, Juicy J, Project Pat, and a very entertaining white guy dressed up like Drizzy’s OVO owl.

Jewish highlight: “I imported mine/Bar mitzvah money like my last name Mordecai/F***you bitch I’m Mordecai/My mom probably hear that and be mortified.”

Yeah, that’s definitely possible.

While many are excited that Thanksgiving is falling on the first day of Hanukkah this year, Stephen Colbert’s conservative alter ego is terrified.

“How dare you Hanukkah?” Colbert said last night on “The Colbert Report,” pointing out that these two holidays have zero connection. “Hanukkah celebrates the struggle of an oppressed people’s fight against invading conquerors, while Thanksgiving is about our healthy and nurturing relationship with the Indians.”

It gets even better when he attempts to draw a hand menorah with a mouth-held Sharpie, and even better than that when he breaks from his character, cracking up over the fact that his effort to create a menorah has resulted in a Hitler mustache.

Funny stuff.

The Maccabeats have released their latest video and, as usual, it is the sweetest thing ever.

This time the tribe’s own a cappella group takes on “D’ror Yikra,” singing it to the tune of “Cups” by Anna Kendrick. The rendition is performed around the Shabbat table, at which the kippah-clad boys appear to be playing the nice Orthodox Jewish boy version of a drinking game.

Tune in and hum along — you won’t be able to help it. (And if your screening is preceded by a Red Lobster ad like ours was, you won’t be able to help laughing a little bit, too.)

Aijia's live performance music video of her song “Good Cry” off her debut EP Learning To Let Go.

This past Monday, many politicians and celebrities, including numerous former prime ministers of Britain paid tribute to Chief Rabbi Jonathan Sacks as he prepares to step down from his post in August.

Watch video of the different tributes here:

Noah goes on his first JewDate. Adam plays a show in Silverlake. Kara ditches Noah.

EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS

Ethan Webman

Stevee Jo Eads

Aaron Webman

Jason Mittleman

Jared Waks

Pinpointing what makes people so passionate about Israel is no easy thing, perhaps because there are so many options. 

It is the Jewish state, the only political entity in the world where Jews are a majority. It is the historical home of the Jewish people, the land of King David and the Temple Mount. It is the religious center of the Jewish universe as well as a holy land to billions of Christians and Muslims. And it is a refuge for Jews from across the globe dating back to before the Holocaust. 

It is a rich, complicated place — qualities that are simultaneously the source of its greatness and its greatest challenges. Actor Jason Alexander of “Seinfeld” fame outlined myriad, yet deeply personal ways of finding meaning in Israel during his opening remarks at December’s Friends of the Israel Defense Forces gala in Century City.

 

 

“Because I love Israel, I do advocate for Palestinians proudly and passionately,” he said. “But there can never be any doubt that I am also an advocate for Israel, a country that is perhaps one of the most maligned, underappreciated and hardest challenged nations on the planet.

“I believe in the right of Israel to exist and to exist in the land where it resides. I believe she is a great country populated by a great and important people. I believe she is a proud and strong democracy in a part in the world where the notion of democracy, of people’s innate right to determine their own fate, finds little company or support.”

These are just a few ways that people can connect to the Holy Land. We asked 18 members of the Jewish and Israeli communities in the Los Angeles area what Israel means to them and — surprise — we got 18 distinct responses. So what does Israel mean to us? Maybe the best way to put it is: Everything.


Susan

Photo by Andy Romanoff

‘A family of people’

“When I was in junior high school, I went to live on a kibbutz in Israel outside of Tel Aviv. … It was all about being with a family of people — that cultural environment and the welcoming warmth, and storytelling over dinner, and sitting around in the afternoon having tea and coffee, and the stories that I got to hear that were just about people’s lives. It’s about a lifestyle.” 

Susan Feniger, 59, Kenter Canyon
Chef/co-owner, Border Grill and Susan Feniger’s STREET


Photo by Andy Romanoff

‘Planting so many trees’

“I remember getting certificates and people planting trees in my honor for my birthday and bar mitzvah, and we all knew how important that was. I think that was my earliest realization that Israel was a difficult environment and that by doing all the amazing things that were done — planting so many trees — they were able to survive in what was otherwise a pretty barren country. … I think it has probably affected my sense of the environment growing up and actively fighting to preserve our environment in this country and the world.”

Paul Koretz, 58, Beverly Center
L.A. city councilmember, District 5


Photo by Joel Lipton

‘It really changed my life’

“Both my parents are Israeli. I consider myself Israeli-American. … I always just had this strong sense of family and stories and knowing where I came from. And then when I went to Israel, it really changed my life. I felt so connected to the land. I just felt like I belonged there. I also just felt a deeper connection with Judaism on my trip. After my trip — a one-year kibbutz ulpan program — I just decided that I wanted to spend the rest of my life being involved in the Jewish community and being connected to Israel.”

— Orly Barad, 26, Woodland Hills
Program manager, Israeli American Council


Photo by Joel Lipton

‘Symbol of resilience and positivity’

“Israel has always been a second home for me while I was living in [my native] Iran, because my grandmother lived there. We spent all our summertimes in Holon and in summer camps in Israel. … Unfortunately, because I cannot go back to Iran, Israel remains my place of my childhood memories and my childhood experiences.

“I lived in Israel for about nine months after the [Iranian] Revolution. It was the biggest gift I could have had when I was a teenager. … I believe that Israel is the most democratic country, that it faces huge challenges, and I feel that Israel as a country has grown in such amazing and beautiful ways. What it means to me is a symbol of resilience and positivity.” 

Shulamit “Shula” Nazarian, 50, Venice and Holmby Hills
Owner/director, Shulamit Gallery

The Anti-Defamation League 'imagines' a world where the hate crimes against Martin Luther King, Anne Frank, Matthew Shepard and others did not take place.

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