Honey cake, down on the farm


Off The Page

It is fall 1943, and David Nathan knows life has changed since the Nazis have taken over the streets of his beloved city of Copenhagen (that’s in Denmark):

Everyone is keeping secrets; David’s older sister, Rachel, sometimes doesn’t come home; and people are waiting for the Allies—the U.S. and Britain—to arrive to come to the rescue (they’ve heard horrible things are happening to the Jews of Europe). When David’s father, a baker who can no longer afford to use butter and cream, asks the boy to deliver a special order of chocolate éclairs, David’s life is forever changed.

“Honey Cake” by Joan Betty Stuchner, illustrated by Cynthia Nugent (Random House, $11.99), offers a lesson in friendship, bravery and courage. The story is a great one for Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, because it talks about the choice each of us has between doing what is easy and doing what is right.

It also includes a recipe to make “Mama’s Honey Cake” and a short history of what happened to the Jews in Denmark. For ages 6-9.

Down on the Farm

” target=”_blank”>www.dannysfarm.com.

Let the games begin!


Aug. 8 is the start of the XXIX Olympiad (just a fancy way of saying the 29th Summer Olympics) in Beijing, China. The games bring together athletes from more than 200 countries to compete for national glory and gold, silver and bronze medals — in a variety of sports (no, shopping is not one of them — I checked).
The opening ceremony will be shown on ” target=”_blank”>23rd annual Children’s Festival of the Arts. Kids of all ages will have the chance to enjoy music from Russia, Korea and India; eat yummy food; get their faces painted, and make really cute crafts they can take home. The folks at Paramount are playing host, which means you never know which famous faces will show up to play.

Free. Noon to 4:30. On the lot of Paramount Pictures, 5555 Melrose Ave., Hollywood (free parking at Bronson Gate). For more information, call (323) 871-2787.

Have We Got a Story for You

kids@jewishjournal.com with your first name, age and city — along with your opinion about gossip. One winner will be selected at random — but the runners-up will have their essays printed on an upcoming YeLAdim page.



The greatest gift of all — and Bunnies!


The Greatest Gift

On June 8, we will celebrate the festival of Shavuot. What is Shavuot?

Choose the words below that make the sentences correct, and then dazzle your friends with all you’ve learned.

  1. Shavuot marks the day we received the (phone book/Torah) at (Mount Sinai/the library). It is one of three (harvest/birthday) festivals.
  2. We count the (omer/animals) for (13/49) days starting on the second day of (Chanukah/Passover).
  3. Shavuot was also the first day on which people could bring the Bikkurim, or the first (fruits/chocolates) to the Temple in Jerusalem.
  4. It is popular to serve (salty/dairy) foods such as cheesecake and blintzes.
  5. We also read the story of (Ruth/Esther), because it talks of the barley and wheat harvest seasons, as well as her conversion to Judaism and acceptance of the (phone book/Torah).

Answers below

The Town That Bunnies Built

“Bunnytown,” the one of the newer

What’s Up for 2007?


YeLAdim will be mixing it up next year with more movies, books, music and TV reviews than ever before. If you have a review you’ve written (or want to write) or have heard of something that you want us to know about, e-mail kids@jewishjournal.com. You’ll be famous, and your parents and grandparents will have something to hang on their fridge.

See ya in 2007!!!

On Oct. 30, students ages 4-12 from local schools including Hawthorne, Stephen S. Wise, Pressman, Maimonides and Hillel participated in the Jewish Community Library of Los Angeles’ third annual Lego Bible Scene Creation event.

Leading honors go to Daniel Pereg and Jacob Zeitzew for their interpretation of Moses leading the Israelites out of Egypt, above, and Raphael Elspas for his menorah. All participants received certificates and prizes, including books and munchies gift cards.

Hope for the New Year

Fourth-graders Avi Berman and Jordan Stern, along with their classmates at Sinai Akiba, created these poems about Israel:

“Peace,” by Avi Berman

Children praying
Hand in hand.
Praying for peace
In all of Israel’s land.
As soldiers stand
In the night.
Keeping Israel
From a fight.

“My Prayer for Israel,” by Jordan Stern

I hope Israel will have peace.
No homeless people or robbers.
Lots of space for kids to play.
And praying for soldiers every day.
Peace for Israel is like flying in the sky.
It doesn’t matter how high, how high.
Peace for Israel is like riding a boat,
While you’re trying to stay afloat.

yeLAdim


Mighty Glad to See You!

It was great seeing so many of you at the Israel Independence Day Festival on May 7 (we hope you enjoyed the fans). Be sure to check out our yeLAdim page on June 30, as we will be printing many of the essays you wrote for our 20th anniversary!

Kein v’ Lo:

Parental Spying?

There’s been a lot of talk in the news about people listening to other people’s phone calls, and some people say parents need to check what their kids are doing online and who they are chatting with — because not everyone on the Internet is telling the truth. Should parents be allowed to do that?

The Kein Side:

  • A lot of kids don’t talk to their parents, and the parents want to make sure their kids are safe from drugs, alcohol, bullies and other things that can hurt them.
  • It is your parents’ house, and you have to live by their rules — when you have your own house, you can have your own rules.

The Lo Side:

  • Parents need to trust their kids — otherwise how will the kids ever learn to be responsible for themselves?
  • It is invasion of privacy to listen to their phone calls and look at someone’s things when they aren’t there.

We want to know what you think. E-mail your thoughts to kids@jewishjournal.com, with the subject line: Parents.

We’ll publish your opinions on a future yeLAdim page.

Pages & Picks

This month’s pick is the very cute “Kvetchy Boy” by Anne-Maire Baila Asner — the latest from Matzah Ball Books.

Kvetchy Boy joins his friends Noshy Boy, Shluffy Girl, Klutzy Boy and Shmutzy Girl in bringing Yiddish expressions to young Jews (don’t worry, each book includes a glossary of words) and teaching everyone about being a better person:

Even at his birthday party, Kvetchy Boy kvetched and kvetched.

“This ice cream made my cake soggy. I hate soggy cake,” said Kvetchy Boy.

“But Kvetchy Boy,” said Noshy Boy, who loves to eat. “The cake tastes even better that way.”

Kvetchy Boy didn’t agree.

If you haven’t seen your favorite Yiddish expression yet, don’t worry — there are more books on the way, including some for grown-ups like “Mrs. Mitzvah” and “Bubby” and “Zaida Kvelly.” You can even buy T-shirts with the different characters on them!

For more information, visit

yeLAdim


Thank You!

The Navon family — Rebecca, Ariella, Eitan, Elisha and Asaf — gave us our pick for our new name: YeLAdim, which means children in Hebrew. The large L and A are in honor of where we live (good thing we aren’t in New York or it wouldn’t work). Thank you to all the kids who sent in ideas for a new name — you are really creative!

Kein v’ Lo:

Vashti

This section of the page will be a way for you as kids to sound off on an issue. This month’s kein v’ lo (yes and no) is about Queen Vashti. Is she, in the 21st century, a role model for women?

The Kein Side:

  • She stood up for what she believed in by refusing to dance in front of her drunk husband and his friends — wearing only her crown — during the royal feast. Even under penalty of death she stood by her convictions.
  • In earlier verses, she is referred to as “Vashti, the queen.” When she tells the king she won’t come, she is called “Queen Vashti,” to show that she has a mind of her own. The king’s advisers feared Vashti would start a trend. One adviser in particular (who some identify as Haman) told Ahashsuerus that he should issue a decree that women should obey their husbands, which he did.

The Lo Side:

  • She hosted a separate feast just for the women, but the sages say she held it in the same palace so the women would have a chance to flirt with the men. Some say she was incredibly vain and didn’t want to dance because she had a skin disease.
  • She was the great-granddaughter of the villainous King Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon, who had destroyed the sacred Temple. On Shabbat, she would summon Jewish women and children and force them to work and do humiliating tasks.

We aren’t saying which is right and which is wrong. We want to know what you think. E-mail your thoughts to kids@jewishjournal.com with the subject line Vashti. We’ll publish your opinions on a future yeLAdim. And whether you like poppy seed or cherry filling in your hamantaschen

— Happy Purim!

About…Purim

“Purim is when we celebrate Jews being free to have their way of life and live peacefully. It teaches fairness and kindness, because it said Haman needed to be kind to people that were not like him, and that Esther was very fair in how she got him to stop.

“But the most important thing about Purim is that it’s a lot of fun. You eat yummy foods and have a big carnival. For Purim, I plan to attend my religious school’s Purim carnival and hear the Megillah.” — Mimi Erlick, 10, Farragut Elementary School, Culver City, and Adat Shalom Religious School.

Do you want to share your opinion about something? Just e-mail kids@jewishjournal.com and put About…(your topic) in the subject line. We’ll print as many as we can.

 

Yeladim


Oh Jerusalem

On June 6, or Iyar 28, we will celebrate Yom Yerushalayim (Jerusalem Day) in honor of the day Jerusalem was reunified during the Six-Day War in 1967.

An Original Word

Etymology – this means “the origin of a word,” or where the word came from. For instance: the word “cap” comes from the Latin word caput, meaning “head.”

Answer these etymological questions:

1. The Assyrians called it Ursalimmu; the Greeks and Romans called it Hierosolyma. What do we call it today?

2. If you got the first question right, answer this one:

The last part of the word is oka.

What does this word mean in Hebrew?

3. And finally: did you answer the second question? So, what does the name of the city mean? It is the city of ________.

Unscramble these letters to get the name of a town in Massachusetts that has a similar name to Jerusalem. (Hint: it wasn’t a very “peaceful” place. They had witch hunts there in the 16th century.)

M L A S E

Why are so many weddings in June?

Fill in the blanks with the following words to get some interesting information about the month of June:

bath, custom, May, flowers, good, smell, married

Next time your Mom reminds you take a bath, think of this fact: back in the 1500s, most people got ______ in June because they took their yearly ____ in _____, and still smelled pretty ______ by June. However, they were starting to ______, so brides carried a bouquet of flowers to hide the body odor.

That is how the _______ of a bride carrying a bouquet got started!

 

Yeladim


 

The Ugly Bug Ball

In Parshat Shemini, we learn which animals are kosher. A young friend of mine asked: Why did God create both kosher and non-kosher animals? The sages of the Talmud ask the same question. They said there is something we can learn from every animal – kosher or not.

For example, the Sages say we can learn honesty and industriousness from an ant. Ants are hardworking, and they are “honest” in that they don’t steal from each other.

King David tried to uncover the meaning behind each animal and he succeeded – but he couldn’t figure out the spider. So, God showed King David how the spider could even save a life. When running for his life from King Saul, David hid in a cave. King Saul and his soldiers were searching everywhere. God sent a spider to spin a web over the opening of the cave in which David was hiding. When the soldiers came to his cave and saw it was covered with a spider’s web, they moved straight past, not realizing that the web was freshly made.

All Creatures Great and Small

Did You Know?

The word for “kindness” in Hebrew is chesed. In the Torah, the Hebrew word for stork is chasida. The rabbis say that the stork was given this name because this bird is very kind and generous with its food and shares with other birds.

1. Where are koala bears from?

a) United States

b) Russia

c) Australia

2. Whales and dolphins are large fish.

a) yes

b) no

c) both

3. What is the largest flying bird alive today?

a) Bald eagle

b) Penguin

c) Condor

d) Albatros

Answers From Last Week

Tell Me a Story: Hamantaschen

 

Yeladim


 

We read the story of Queen Esther, Megillat Esther, twice – on Thursday evening and Friday morning. Let’s see if you know the story.

Put the parts in the right order.

__Mordechai tells Esther Haman’s plan.

__Mordechai will not bow to Haman. Haman decides to kill all the Jews on Adar.

__4. Mordechai saves the kings life by overhearing and exposing a plot to kill him.

__Haman is hanged along with his 10 sons.

__Vashti is canned. Esther becomes the new queen.

__Queen Vashti refuses to show up at the party.

__On the 13th day of Adar, the Jews outside the city of Shushan defend themselves. They win! They celebrate their victory on the 14th of Adar. That day becomes the holiday of Purim.

__The king can’t sleep. He reads his diary and remembers that Mordechai saved his life.

__Esther risks her life by going to Ahasuerus uninvited. She invites him and Haman to a banquet.

__At the banquet, Esther reveals that she is a Jew and that Haman wants to kill her people.

__King Ahasuerus throws a party.

__9. Haman visits the king. Ahasuerus calls Haman to take Mordechai around town in royal robes, riding a white horse.)

Now that you have put the story in order, find the hidden word by locating the letter in each sentence that matches the number below. (Hint: In the fourth sentence, the 11th letter is A.)

–  –  –  – –  –  –  – –  –  – –

6 7 2 1 1 1 2 1 2 4 1 2

 

Yeladim


 

Building Community

This week’s Torah portion, Vayakhel (meaning “and he gathered”), is about the community of Israelites building the Mishkan. Think about the communities you belong to: your school, your neighborhood and your synagogue. How can you be a bigger part of your community? Pick up trash in your neighborhood; offer yourself as a babysitter, weed-puller or dog-walker; or have a bake sale at your school to raise money for a charity or school program.

Why Not Pie?

( Ask a grown-up for help before you begin. You’ll be using a knife and an oven for this recipe.)

You Need :

1 package refrigerated pre-made pie crusts (you will need two crusts – for the top and bottom of the pie)

8 apples

1 cup sugar

1/2 teaspoon

cinnamon

1 tablespoon flour

Plate

Vegetable peeler

Knife

Large bowl

Pie plate

Oven mitts

1. Preheat the oven to 425 F.)

2. Unfold the premade pie crusts and place on a big plate.

3. Ask an adult to help you peel and slice apples into a large bowl.

4. Pour 1 cup of sugar and 1/2 teaspoon of cinnamon over the apples. Add 1 tablespoon of flour to make the filling thicker.

5. Mix everything together with your hands. Then leave the mixture in the bowl for five minutes.

6. Put the bottom crust in a pie plate. Sprinkle it with a little bit of flour.

7. Pour the apple mixture into the crust and sprinkle a little more flour over the apples.

8. Cover the apples with the top piece of piecrust.

9. Fold the edges of the bottom crust up over the top crust and pinch together to seal.

10. Poke three sets of two “V-shaped” slits into the crust. These slits are vents so steam can come out.

11. Bake the pie for 25 minutes. Remove. Cool. And the rest is – easy as pie!

 

Yeladim


This week’s portion is named for Moses’ father-in-law, Yitro. Moses is exhausted because he spends the whole day talking to anyone who needs counseling or judgment. Yitro, who is visiting him, says: “You’ll kill yourself if you keep up at this pace. Get some people to help you.” And that’s exactly what Moses does.
Do your parents ever seem too exhausted to pay any attention to you? The best way you can help your parents out is by telling them you understand, that you know how much they love you and you know that they will give you the attention you need as soon as they are able.

Moses took care of 600,000 Jews. Today, there are 13.2 million of us in the whole world. That’s still not very many.
Here is a list of a few Jewish populations around the world.
Can you match the city or country to the amount of Jews who live there?
Send your answer to abbygilad@yahoo.com.

Israel   5,000,000
Los Angeles   600,000
India   120
France   360,000
Canada   2,000,000
New York   6,000
Tahiti   600,000

A Jewish Memory
Here is a story written by a sixth-grader.

A few years ago, my dad took me to visit my grandma, Helen, at the nursing home. She was 92, and had had a stroke four years earlier. No one could talk to her much because she was always sleeping. Through the years, she just got worse and worse until she couldn’t even open an eyelid.
When we got there, it was kind of a shock to me, since I hadn’t been there for so long. We finally found Grandma in a wheelchair in the patio. As usual, she was fast asleep. With her pale face and thinning hair, she did not look like the beloved grandmother I used to know. My father told me to talk to her. I tried but she didn’t move. I told jokes, laughed, whistled; I even acted out something funny that I had recently seen on TV, but my grandmother stayed still as a rock.
My dad saw my impatience, and said sympathetically: “Come on, honey, we can leave now,” he said.
But I didn’t budge. I felt I had a goal to attain, so I wouldn’t just let go.
“Let me try one last time,” I answered. I thought and thought, and just when I couldn’t think anymore, I remembered I knew a little Yiddish.
A few months ago had been Yom HaShoah, Holocaust Memorial Day. I, together with the rest of my class had sang many Holocaust songs including, “Zog Nit Keyn Mol.” I knew Grandma grew up speaking Yiddish with her five sisters in New York, so I gave it one more shot. I sang the song. Surprisingly, it worked. Grandma opened her eyes and smiled. And even though it was only for a brief second, I knew I would treasure that moment forever. I did.
Grandma died on Oct. 26, 2003.

Yeladim


 

This week, we start a new year – and a new book. Shemot (Exodus) is the second book of the Torah. The Israelites are in the deepest winter of their lives – a dark slavery. In this book, we will read about their move toward freedom, rebirth and spring.

Congratulations!

So many of you wrote in with answers to our puzzles this last week. Congrats to all those who answered correctly and you will receive a gift certificate.

Winners receive a gift certificate to either Baskin-Robbins or Munchies.

Reading Rainbow

For four months, religious school students in the Noah’s Ark Reading Contest at Temple Isaiah read “From Rain to Rainbows.” Students read any type of Jewish book at their grade level, and then report on it to librarian Ellen Cole. Each book gives students a point toward prizes; biblical stories count double. The more competitors read, the more they win. Last year’s big winner read 99 books.

If you want to create a program like this at your school, call Temple Isaiah at (310) 277-2772 and ask for Ellen

 

Yeladim


 

This month, Tevet is the darkest month because the days are shortest. And, in this month, a siege began on Jerusalem, which eventually led to the destruction of the Temple. That is why we had a fast day on the 10th of Tevet (Dec. 22).

But here’s an interesting fact about Tevet and the holiday we just celebrated – Chanukah. If you count the number of candles we lit (not including the shamash) you get 36. If you count the number of days from the beginning of Chanukah (25 Kislev) until the last day of Tevet, you get – 36. Pretty cool, huh?

This is the season of lights.

It’s also the season of presents.

Follow the lines to find who is holding the ribbon to which present:

I was at the Westside JCC’s 50th anniversary the other day. There was a big cake and a lot of Chanukah fun. And guess whom I got to stand next to on stage?

Follow the clues to answer the question:

1) A rainbow drops into a pot of__________

2) How many fringes on a tallit? ___________

3) Part of his name sounds “Krazy!”

5) His first name rhymes with Penny _______

6) An event that started in ancient Greece ___________

Who is he and what did he do? Send your answer to abbygilad@yahoo.com for your prize!

 

Yeladim


 

At the Jewish Children’s Bookfest at Mount Sinai on Nov. 14, children were given a journal and asked the following question:

“What does being Jewish in America mean to me?”

Here is our first response, by Caleigh Gumbiner, a fourth-grader at Balboa Magnet in Northridge: “To me, being Jewish in America means I can be free to study Torah when I like and how I would like to study it. It also means I don’t have to be treated differently or badly because of my religion.”

The pilgrims came to America so they could practice their religion in freedom, just like Caleigh practices her Judaism. We must all work together to make sure that America remains a country of freedom.

Here are some of the things the kindergartners at the Westside JCC are thankful for:

“I am thankful for my parents even though they’re kinda silly. Sometimes, if they’re mad, I’ll come to see what I did wrong and sometimes when they’re sad, I can make them feel better!”

– Sydney

“I am thankful for my strawberry plant because my Mommy gave it to me and it’s very special.”

– Emma

Mail your cartoons, drawings, puzzles, etc. to The Jewish Journal, 3580 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 1510, Los Angeles, CA 90010. E-mail your written answers to our contests, or your jokes, riddles, poems, etc., to kids@jewishjournal.com. Make sure you write your name and address in your e-mail. See you next time!

 

Yeladim


In Parshat Toldot, Jacob and Esau are born. Even though they are twins, they are opposites: Jacob is the quiet, studious type, while Esau is a hunter who loves to be out in the world. The world used to think of Jews as being just quiet and studious, but when Israel became a state the Jews there developed one of the strongest armies in the world.

Don’t let yourself be given a label – you can be an American, a Jew, an intellectual and a fighter, all at the same time.

There are many American Jews who became war heroes, too, don’t forget to honor them this Veterans Day on Nov. 11.

Write a story, song or poem about: My Happiest Jewish Memory. Send your entry by Dec. 31, to Jews for Judaism, 9911 Pico Blvd., No. 1240, Los Angeles, CA 90035. Go to www.jewsforjudaism.com for an entry form.

Mail your cartoons, drawings, puzzles, etc. to The Jewish Journal, 3580 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 1510, Los Angeles, CA 90010. E-mail your written answers to our contests, or your jokes, riddles, poems, etc., to kids@jewishjournal.com. Make sure you write your name and address in your e-mail. See you next time!

Yeladim


Let’s Work

In this week’s portion, Lech Lecha, we learn about a fight between the shepherds of Abraham and his nephew, Lot. There was plenty of space for everyone, but they weren’t getting along so it seemed too crowded. Our rabbis teach us that when two people get along, they can be happy together sharing even the smallest of spaces, but when they don’t, the whole world can seem too small.

By working at getting along with the people around us, we can make our whole world seem bigger and brighter.

Don’t forget to send in your essay of where you would go in time and space if you could climb into a time machine? Write an essay, story or poem telling us about your adventure. Send entries by Nov. 4. to abbygilad@yahoo.com. Remember to include your full name, age, address, school and grade.