Recipe: Summertime tomato salad with tahini dressing


Jeff visited Israel for the first time as a teenager in the summer of 1973. Left to his own devices, he managed to run out of money just outside Bethlehem, where an acquaintance told him about a group of monks who lived up in the hills. They offered room and board to weary (or broke) travelers in exchange for work. For a hungry teenager, it sounded like a good deal. Jeff located the monastery at the end of a goat trail, and settled into a work routine that began at dawn and ended at noon, when it was too hot to continue laboring outside. Every day, without exception, lunch started with this salad. We’ve been eating it ever since. It’s perfect in summertime, when ripe tomatoes and green peppers weigh heavy on the vines in the garden. Adding feta cheese would make this a dairy dish. Try it both ways, with and without the cheese, for a slightly different taste. Serves 4. This recipe is pareve.

Wine notes: A light, fresh-tasting white wine or rosé is the ticket for this salad.

  • ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons tahini (roasted sesame seed paste)
  • 1 tablespoon ground cumin
  • ½ medium onion, finely chopped
  • 2 green bell peppers, cut into ¼-inch dice
  • 4 to 5 tomatoes, cut into ¼-inch dice, or 1 pint cherry tomatoes, halved
  • ¼ pound feta cheese, crumbled or diced (optional)

 

In a large serving bowl, stir together the olive oil, tahini, and cumin. Mix in the onion to coat well with the dressing. Add the green peppers and tomatoes and toss to coat them evenly. If using, add the cheese and toss the vegetable mixture once more before serving.

From 'The Covenant Kitchen'

Mark the New Year with late summer harvest menu


A recent trip to Italy made me aware of the wonderful possibilities of growing your own lush, flavorful garden-fresh food. The villa where we stayed was entirely self-sufficient, with magnificent varieties of produce, eggs gathered from the hen house and the proprietors even making their own wine and olive oil.

 
If you have a garden, you know the pleasure of eating the freshest of salad greens, tomatoes, vegetables and fruits. And since the weather is still warm as Rosh Hashanah arrives at sundown on Friday, Sept. 22, take advantage of the healthy garden bounties and prepare a light menu featuring the late summer harvest of fresh vegetables and fruits to celebrate the New Year.

 
If you’re not a gardener, visit some of the local open-air farmers’ markets. The Wednesday morning Santa Monica farmers market is one of the largest, and there is an organic Saturday market as well, where the selection and variety is very impressive.

 
After a special round challah and apple slices dipped in honey, start the dinner with a simple salad of avocado and tomato slices served on a bed of pungently flavored arugula and dressed with a tangy orange vinaigrette. Hopefully, you will be lucky enough to make it with full-flavored tomatoes from your garden; nothing compares with vine-ripened tomatoes. If they are not available, your local farmers’ market will have a selection of the tasty heirloom tomatoes.

 
Arugula is not only trendy and delicious, but very easy to grow, and seeds are available at most nurseries.

 
Next, serve a chilled beet borscht, my version of gazpacho, and pass around bowls of chopped cucumbers, green and yellow bell peppers, and chives, for a colorful do-it-yourself garnish.

 
The main course is a whole roast chicken that has been butterflied and baked on bed of fresh vegetables — a combination of garlic, onions, celery, carrots, parsnips, squash and potatoes, and garnished with fresh herbs from your garden. With this dish we will drink a special toast for a peaceful year with a glass of young, fruity chardonnay.
 
For dessert, late summer pl
ums, arranged in colorful circles on a light pastry dough make a delicious eye-appealing tart. Serve a sweet late harvest wine or hot tea with lemon, and let the children choose their favorite fruit juice.

 
Cold Puree of Beet Borscht
4 medium-size beets, unpeeled
4 tablespoons lemon juice
4 tablespoons sugar
1 teaspoon salt
Diced cucumbers
Diced green and yellow red peppers

 
Scrub the outside of the beets using cold water, place in a large pot and add enough cold water to cover. Bring to a boil and simmer until a fork inserted in the beet is tender, about one hour. Cool. Remove the beets, but reserve the liquid. Peel the skin, which should come off easily, and discard.

 
Dice the beets and return to the liquid. Place half of the diced beets and liquid in a blender or food processor and puree until smooth. Transfer puree to a bowl and repeat the process with the remaining beets and liquid. Add lemon juice, sugar and salt to taste and mix well. To serve, ladle into shallow soup bowls and garnish with cucumbers and peppers.

 
Makes eight to 10 servings.

 
Avocado, Tomato and Arugula Salad

 
Usually avocados are served mashed or chopped. For this dish, simply slice the avocados and tomatoes, which enables them to harmonize with the pungent-flavored arugula.

 
2 avocados, peeled and seeded
Juice of 1 lemon
2 large tomatoes, sliced
3 cups loosely packed arugula, coarse stems discarded
Vinaigrette dressing (recipe follows)
Pomegranate seeds for garnish, optional

 
Cut each avocado into nine to 12 lengthwise slices. Sprinkle with lemon juice and set aside. Slice tomatoes and set aside.

 
Wash arugula and dry. Slice and mound arugula on chilled plates, fan the avocado slices around the mounds and arrange the sliced tomatoes in the center.

 
Spoon enough vinaigrette over each salad to coat leaves, and season to taste with salt and pepper. Garnish with pomegranate seeds, if desired. Serve immediately.

 
Makes six to eight servings.

 
Vinaigrette Dressing
1 tablespoon Dijon-style prepared mustard
3 tablespoons white wine vinegar
1 tablespoons lemon juice
1/2 cup walnut oil
Salt, freshly ground black pepper

 
Place mustard, vinegar, lemon juice in a processor or blender. Add oil in thin stream and blend until slightly thick and creamy. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

 
Butterflied Roast Chicken With Medley of Vegetables
1 (4-pound) or 2 (2-pound) whole chickens
1 onion, sliced and diced
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 celery stalk, thinly sliced
4 carrots, peeled and thinly sliced
1 parsnip, peeled and thinly sliced
1 medium potato, diced and steamed
2 tablespoons minced parsley
6 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
3 tablespoons minced fresh rosemary

 
Marinade
1/3 cup olive oil
1/4 teaspoon each dried basil, thyme and rosemary, crushed
Salt, to taste
Freshly ground black pepper, to taste
2 to 3 cups dry white wine

 
Preheat the oven to 450 degrees. Split the chicken along the entire length of the back, removing backbone from tail to neck. Open it out, skin side up. With a mallet or the heel of your hand, flatten the chicken, fracturing the breastbone and ribcage, so it lays flat. Arrange vegetables on a foil-lined large roasting pan, and place the chicken on top, skin-side up.

 
Mix garlic and rosemary together. Working with your fingertips, separate the skin from the meat of the chicken, beginning at the neck end, being careful not to tear the skin. Place sliced garlic and rosemary under the skin, including the drumsticks and thighs. Mix together the olive oil and herbs and rub it on the top of the chicken and sprinkle with salt and pepper.

 
Pour the marinade over the vegetables and chicken and bake for l0 minutes. Reduce the oven temperature to 375 degrees, and bake for 45 minutes to one hour longer, depending on the size of the chicken. Baste every 20 minutes. If chicken browns too quickly, cover it loosely with foil. If the marinade cooks away too quickly, add more. Remove the foil during the last 10 minutes, allowing the chicken to brown.

Recipes Add Spice to New Party Trend


Although today’s bar mitzvah parties are often as elaborate as yesterday’s weddings, there’s a new trend on the horizon — a, noisy, jubilant oneg Shabbat and lunch directly after the ceremony, and a quiet, intimate dinner at home for a few close friends and family at night.

The reasons are strictly practical.

Instead of watching their parents spend exorbitant amounts of money on an elaborate Saturday night party, many bar mitzvahs are imploring that they’d rather steer the funds in another direction.

Molly wants a horse. Sammy wants to spend a summer in Israel. Tiara has her eye on Yale and plans to deposit the funds into her college account.

It’s actually a win-win situation for everyone. The stress of planning the fancy party evaporates; those closest to the event have an intimate setting to revel in their pride and joy’s accomplishment; and, at 13, the celebrant gets the satisfaction of making the first big decision as an adult and enjoying the fruits of this sagacity.

And just because the cost isn’t astronomical, doesn’t mean the setting won’t be inviting and the meal delicious. For the occasion, we’ve come up with a creative, festive menu — easy to prepare in advance, healthful and energizing.

Many of these recipes are from dietitian and chef Cheryl Forberg, who always has an eye toward health, while preparing dishes that delight the senses. The delicious almond nut torte is from L.A. chef Toribio Prado.

Edamame Guacamole with Stone-ground Corn Chips

Adapted from “Stop the Clock Cooking” by Cheryl Forberg (Avery/Penguin Putnam, 2003).

1 cup shelled edamame (fresh, green soy beans)

2 cloves garlic, peeled and minced

1 to 2 teaspoons chopped chipotle chili, with seeds

1 tablespoon fresh lime juice, divided

2 large ripe avocados

1/4 cup stemmed, roughly chopped cilantro

1/2 cup finely chopped skinned tomatoes

2 tablespoons finely chopped white onion

Sea salt and cayenne pepper to taste

Corn Chips

One 9.5-ounce package stone-ground corn tortillas (12 count)

Olive oil cooking spray

Olive oil as needed

Salt to taste (optional)

Garnish

1 tablespoon chopped fresh cilantro

For guacamole, cook edamame in salted boiling water for five minutes. Drain and cool to room temperature.

Combine edamame, garlic, chili and 2 teaspoons lime juice in a food processor bowl. Process until mixture is very smooth, about three minutes. Set aside.

Peel and seed avocados; place in medium mixing bowl. Add remaining 1 teaspoon lime juice and mash with a fork, leaving small chunks. Fold in edamame mixture, cilantro, tomatoes and onion. Season with salt and pepper. Garnish with cilantro.

For chips, preheat oven to 400 F. Stack the 12 tortillas and cut them into eighths. Spread the tortilla chips in a single layer on baking sheets, drizzle with olive oil, and sprinkle with salt, if desired.

Bake chips until they are crisp and slightly golden, about 10 minutes. Transfer cooked chips to a basket lined with paper napkins.

Makes 2 1/2 cups.

Tomato-Ginger Bisque

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 small minced onion

2 tablespoons minced shallot

1 tablespoon peeled and sliced fresh ginger

2 cloves garlic, peeled and minced

2 pounds ripe tomatoes, peeled and coarsely chopped

1 teaspoon fresh thyme, crumbled

1 small bay leaf

1 1/4 cup vegetable or chicken broth

1/2 cup white wine

1 tablespoon lemon juice

Pinch of saffron threads

Salt and pepper to taste

1/4 cup fresh basil leaves, cut in chiffonade for garnish

(The chiffonade cut is done by rolling the leaves lengthwise and slicing crosswise into thin slivers.)

Heat olive oil in a 2-quart saucepan over medium heat. Add onion, shallot, garlic and ginger. Sauté until translucent, stirring occasionally, about seven minutes.

Add tomatoes, thyme, bay leaf and saffron. Simmer until mixture begins to thicken, about four minutes more.

Add broth, wine and lemon juice. Bring to a boil. Immediately reduce heat and simmer 20 minutes. Remove slices of ginger.

Puree soup in a food processor until smooth. Or, if you prefer, serve it chunky. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Garnish with basil.

This recipe can be prepared the day before. When re-heating it, make sure the flame is low so that liquid doesn’t evaporate.

Makes four servings.

Egyptian Eggplant Salad

The simple earthiness of this large salad melds the flavors of the East and the West.

Salad

2 large eggplants

1 1/2 heads romaine lettuce, washed, dried and torn into bite-size pieces

1 medium red bell pepper, cut into fine dice

1/2 medium green bell pepper, cut into fine dice

1 English cucumber, peeled and cut into fine dice

1 cup chopped green onions (green and white parts)

1/2 cup chopped fresh Italian parsley, without stems

1/2 cup chopped fresh mint, without stems

Dressing

2 tablespoons minced garlic

1/4 cup fresh lemon juice

1 tablespoon ground cumin

1 1/2 teaspoons salt

1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes or 1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper

1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil

Salt and pepper to taste

Preheat oven to 350 F. Position rack in middle of oven.

Rinse off eggplant. Cut off stem end. Pierce skin with a fork. Lightly coat a 10- to 15-inch baking sheet with olive oil spray. Place eggplant on baking sheet and bake for about 40 minutes, turning it three or four times to roast evenly.

Remove from oven. When cool enough to handle, peel and discard eggplant skin. Remove most of the seeds and cut into chunks.

Place lettuce into a large mixing bowl. Add peppers, cucumber, green onions, parsley, mint and eggplant.

For dressing, mash garlic with lemon juice until smooth. Add cumin, salt and red pepper flakes or cayenne. Whisk oil in a thin stream until incorporated. There will be about 3/4 cup of dressing.

Pour 1/4 cup of the dressing over salad and toss well. Season with salt and pepper. Pass remaining dressing separately. This salad may be assembled the night before, including tossing it with the dressing, which gives it time for the flavors to meld.

Makes eight servings.

Grilled Chicken with Walnut and Pomegranate Sauce

Note: Pomegranate syrup (also called pomegranate molasses or pomegranate concentrate) can be found in Middle Eastern markets and in some supermarkets.

Walnut and Pomegranate Sauce

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 cup finely chopped yellow onion

1/2 teaspoon saffron or turmeric

1/4 teaspoon cinnamon

1/4 teaspoon nutmeg

1/4 teaspoon pepper

2 cups fat-free chicken or vegetable broth

1/2 cup chopped walnuts

1/4 cup pomegranate syrup

1 tablespoon sorghum syrup or dark honey

Salt and pepper to taste

Grilled Chicken

6 (3-ounce) boneless, skinless chicken breast halves

1 tablespoon olive oil

Salt and pepper to taste

Garnish

1/4 cup chopped fresh Italian parsley, without stems

1/2 cup pomegranate seeds (optional)

To prepare sauce, heat oil in large sauté pan over medium heat. Add onion and cook until light golden brown, about eight minutes. Add spices and cook until fragrant, about one minute.

Add 1 1/2 cups of the chicken broth and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low and simmer for five minutes. Remove from heat.

Place walnuts in food processor bowl and process until very finely ground. Add remaining 1/2 cup chicken broth, the pomegranate syrup and sorghum syrup.

Process until sauce is creamy and smooth. Carefully add the hot broth and onion mixture. Puree again until smooth.

Return sauce to sauté pan. Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer until consistency thickens, about three minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Keep warm.

Preheat charcoal grill. Brush chicken lightly with olive oil. Arrange chicken on a rack set about six inches over glowing coals. Grill about four minutes on each side, or until just cooked through (or on a hot, ridged grill pan over medium-high heat). Season with salt and pepper. Serve hot.

Serve each chicken breast with 2 tablespoons of sauce and garnish with chopped parsley and pomegranate seeds (if available.) Pass extra sauce separately.

Makes six servings.

Tezpishtl (Turkish almond nut torte)

From Los Angeles chef Toribio Prado

Syrup

2 cups sugar

2 cups water

2 teaspoons lemon juice

Cake

5 eggs

1 cup sugar

1/4 cup corn or sunflower oil

Juice and zest of 1 orange

2 teaspoons ground cinnamon

1 1/4 cups fine matzah cake meal

1 1/4 cups finely chopped blanched almonds.

To make syrup, mix sugar and water together in a saucepan; bring to boil. Add lemon juice; simmer over low heat for 10 minutes. Cool.

To make cake, beat eggs until frothy; add sugar and continue to beat until golden and well mixed. Add other ingredients, one at a time; stir into batter.

Pour into oiled and floured 13 x 9 x 2-inch cake pan; bake at 350 F for 30 minutes. Test for doneness with a toothpick.

Remove cake from oven; pour cooled syrup over it. Let cake stand for two hours before serving to allow syrup to be absorbed.

Makes one cake, about 18 pieces.

Honey and Marinated Fig Topping

1/2 pound dried white figs

1 bottle port wine

1/2 cup sugar

1 teaspoon lemon juice

1 cup honey

Pinch of nutmeg

Pinch of cinnamon

Wash figs and dry well. Place figs and port wine in large bowl; marinate overnight. Drain figs; reserve wine.

In large saucepan add sugar, lemon juice, honey. Simmer, being careful not to burn sugar.

Raise flame to medium. Add reserved port wine, cinnamon and nutmeg. Reduce by half and add figs. Stir well. Serve with torte.