October 22, 2018

Report: BDS Has Ties to Terror Groups

Photo from Wikimedia Commons.

The Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions’ (BDS) ties to terrorism have officially been exposed in a June 1 report from Tablet.

The report explains that The U.S. Campaign for Palestinian Rights, which is “the American umbrella group of the BDS movement,” funneled tax-exempt donations to the Palestinian BDS National Committee (BNC), which has funded and worked with terror groups like Hamas, Islamic Jihad and the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP).

Under the legal name of the Education for Just Peace in the Middle East, the U.S. Campaign for Palestinian Rights used its “fiscal sponsorship” of BNC “to temporarily extend their privileges as a nonprofit” to that organization.

“The BNC is located far from U.S. soil, and it is unclear that the US Campaign has much say on how the money collected on behalf of its Palestinian sponsoree will be spent,” the report states. “There is no indication that any of the money raised through the fiscal sponsorship is going to terror groups, nor is there any clear way of ascertaining how the money collected is spent. All that is clear is that there’s a financial relationship between these two separate groups.”

The Simon Wiesenthal Center’s Rabbis Marvin Hier and Abraham Cooper issued a statement on the June 1 report that read, “Any person of faith who endorses the anti-Semitic BDS movement should now realize that they are also supporting the goals of its sponsors, among them people with the blood of more than 1,000 Israelis and tourists on their hands,” Hier and Cooper said. “The hypocrisy of BDS has always been obvious, but now it’s official.”

StandWithUs also issued a statement on June 1 noting that one of the key members for the U.S. Campaign for Palestinian Rights’ is American Muslims for Palestine (AMP), an organization that is connected to Hamas.

“USCPR has always deceptively marketed itself as a human rights group, while relentlessly promoting campaigns of hate across the United States,” Roz Rothstein, CEO of StandWithUs, said in the statement. “Lawmakers, community leaders, and the general public need to be aware of how toxic this organization truly is.”

Jewish site refers to Harvey Weinstein as a ‘Jewish kind of pervert’

Photo from Wikimedia Commons.

The Jewish site Tablet published a piece on Monday that referred to Harvey Weinstein as “a deeply Jewish kind of pervert.” The author of the piece received considerable backlash and has issued an apology on the Tablet Magazine website.

Mark Oppenheimer, an editor-at-large at Tablet, wrote a piece titled “The Specifically Jewy Perviness of Harvey Weinstein” and stated that what differentiated Weinstein from the likes of Roger Ailes, Bill O’Reilly and Bill Clinton was that he “is a deeply Jewish kind of pervert.”

These despicable gents [Ailes, O’Reilly] have power and influence, and they aren’t above promising a lucrative gig—or threatening to take it away—to get laid,” wrote Oppenheimer. “In these transactions, women are nothing but objects, and any ‘consent’ is just an illusion.”

Weinstein, on the other hand, sought “unattainable Gentiles” as if it were part of “one big performance piece,” argued Oppenheimer.

Growing up in Queens, he fantasized of fame and fortune, and, once he got them, he struggled to maintain them by building himself into a larger-than-life figure,” wrote Oppenheimer. “He yelled at employees like he was a studio boss from the 1920s—the only thing missing was a riding crop. He ran Oscars campaigns like they used to in Old Hollywood. And he harassed women not necessarily to use them as instruments of his pleasure, but to use them as instruments of his power.”

Oppenheimer concluded his piece by pointing out that most of the women who have come forward about Weinstein were Gentiles.

The piece received fierce backlash on Twitter:

Oppenheimer initially defended the piece, telling The Wrap in an email, “What I was trying to do in this case was examine how common narratives — particularly those transmitted by literature — might influence how people may be processing Weinstein’s Jewish identity in this story.”

However, Oppenheimer eventually wrote an apology on Tablet’s website.

Yesterday I published a piece on Harvey Weinstein that many found offensive. The analysis I offered was hasty and ill-considered, especially in light of the even graver accusations that were published by the New Yorker this morning,” wrote Oppenheimer. “I take this as a lesson in the importance of knowing as much as one can about a given story, and in taking the time to think and feel things completely through before opining. I apologize for not doing so in this case.”

Not everyone was satisfied with the apology.

Several women have come forward accusing Weinstein of sexual harassment and three women have accused him of rape. Audio has emerged of Weinstein admitting to groping a woman.

Educated women and children

On the Jewish Web site The Tablet, Michelle Goldberg, a senior contributing editor to The Nation, recently wrote: “In the United States, women tend to have fewer children the more education they have — those with advanced degrees have only 1.67 children each. Jewish women are better educated than the population at large, which is why their birthrates are even lower …”

This statistic provides yet another illustration of the low moral state of our universities. Just think: The more formal education a woman has, the fewer children she will desire. 

For those who care about Jewish or American survival, this should be, to put it mildly, disconcerting. If Jewish and other American women don’t reproduce, the populations of Jews and Americans will decline. And in the case of Jews, this is particularly problematic.

The question that needs to be addressed is, why? Why do the best-educated women have the fewest children?

Here are three explanations:

The first — and, I believe, most important — reason that women who attend graduate school have fewer children than other women is that the longer women (and men) stay in academic life, the longer they are exposed to values that denigrate the family in favor of career.

One can argue until the proverbial cows come home that feminism never pushed career over marriage and family, that it only wanted women to have a choice. But that argument is dishonest. Feminism greatly valued career above marriage and family. The result is that in our post-feminist (post-1970s) world, for a girl or woman of any age to say that she would like to be, or that she is, or that she was a full-time wife and mother takes courage. Among well-educated women, a woman accrues more prestige being in sales at Nordstrom than she does as a “homemaker.” The very word conjures up nightmarish images to most women with graduate degrees.

The more time a young woman spends at university, especially at a prestigious one, the more she is indoctrinated into believing that what really matters is career. Test it: Ask a young woman who attends a prestigious university — especially a Jewish woman who is not Orthodox — what she most wants in life, and it is quite likely that she will respond “a good career.”

Let’s be honest. If you asked a female in her junior year at Yale, “What do you most want in life?” and she responded, “To find a good man to marry and then make a family with him,” you would be shocked.

In fact, you would probably have to look for an explanation. And that explanation would likely be that she is a religious Christian or an Orthodox Jew.

Which brings us to a second reason for the extremely low birthrate among well-educated women — secularism.

The widely offered explanation for why fertility rates drop is affluence. As countries get wealthier, the thinking goes, the birth rate drops.

There is some truth to this, but there is a better explanation: secularism. As societies become more secular, the fertility rate drops. 

This is easy to demonstrate. Wealthy Orthodox Jews, wealthy devout Roman Catholics, wealthy Mormons and wealthy Evangelicals have a lot of kids. Meanwhile, wealthy secular people have the fewest children.

While secularism is good for government, it is a dead end for the individual and society. It is a moral dead end. Without God, good and evil are purely matters of opinion. And it is an existential dead end. If there is no God, life is objectively pointless. We live, we die, there is no reason we are here, and there is nothing when we leave.

So what do people do with that view of life? Some devote their lives to secular religions such as feminism, socialism, environmentalism or egalitarianism. And many simply decide — quite rationally — that in the incredibly brief time they are alive, they will enjoy themselves as much as possible. Hedonism is the most rational response to secularism. 

In such a world, children are often regarded as disruptive to whatever pleasures life affords. With a bunch of kids at home, it is hard to take many trips, and hard to see a movie or dine out whenever you want. 

In the age of birth control and of almost unlimited lifestyle options, one needs good reasons to have more than one — or even one — child. Religion has always provided such reasons: God wants you to be fruitful; it is vitally important to hand down one’s faith; the family is the locus of a religious life, etc.

A third and final reason is age. By the time a woman is finished with graduate school, she is likely to be close to 30 years old. And after all that work, she understandably wants to begin putting her education to good use — you can’t waste a doctorate or a master’s degree. So she further defers marriage. And even if she does marry, she defers having children. By the time she is ready to make a family, she may feel that she is too old to have more than 1.67 children.

American Jewry reveres graduate degrees. But this reverence comes at a steep price. The longer young women (and men) stay at the university (especially in the social sciences), the more secular they are likely to become, the more alienated from Israel they are likely to become (there is no mainstream institution as anti-Israel as the university), and the less likely they are to have more than one child.


Dennis Prager is a nationally syndicated radio talk-show host (AM 870 in Los Angeles) and founder of PragerUniversity.com. His latest book is the New York Times best seller “Still the Best Hope: Why the World Needs American Values to Triumph” (HarperCollins, 2012)