Oh so sorry


I’m sorry I haven’t eaten more hot dogs. 

Saturday is Selichot, the time when the whole Jewish world sings with Connie Francis, “I’m sorry,” and vows to do better next time. Many of us are focused on the wrongs we’ve done to others, or even to God. 

This year, however, as I contemplate in yet a new way the impact of lung cancer, there’s no one to whom I owe apology more than myself. 

Yes, many of my apologies go to me. I should have eaten more hot dogs, with mustard and sauerkraut. And even more hush puppies, which in Jewish delis are hot dogs wrapped in potato knish, served best (if not only) in New York. 

I know what you’re thinking: you were only watching your health. But if you want a hot dog and never give yourself a hot dog, what are you accomplishing? Fear of food is, I think, a crime against the soul, the shutting down of the appetite by which we show our confidence in being alive. 

For years I refused to eat popcorn at the movies. I was a college student and deemed myself too good for plebeian food. That year, a New York theater started popping its kernels and brewing its own coffee to sell with the latest Belmondo film. Popcorn brought great enjoyment to my next James Bond movie. Sean Connery is such a hunk, and I apologized profusely to myself for having missed out on the great all-American experience — albeit without butter. 

If I’m going to keep the appetite going, I have to respond to where the taste buds tingle. 

Since I received a lung cancer diagnosis, I’ve been macrobiotic, lived on smoothies, Chinese herbs, Ensure shakes. But even before I was fanatic. I ate pasta with broccoli. Broccoli, with Vitamin C, may reduce breast cancer. I never smoked cigarettes, which is linked to 85 percent of lung cancers. 

Today, when it might help, my body is in overdose. I avoid any food colored green. I’m no doctor, but any one of these regimens destroys appetite in all its meanings faster than a hot dog now and again. It’s the luck of the draw. Eat a hot dog or not, you can get cancer anyway. Might as well live. 

And although early on I cut out sugar and dairy, ice cream is now my dinner of choice. 

I begrudge myself nothing. If you don’t express your appetite, what comes next? Soon you won’t have any. A friend will ask if you want to eat by the ocean, and you won’t know. Soon enough, you miss the summer sunset, and the blooming begonia, and the loveliness of a child’s smile. It takes will to live. 

More hot dogs. More fun. 

Lung cancer taught me that what we do today is fun. Tomorrow the bill comes due. Develop taste. Don’t be a snob. Don’t live in regret. Don’t worry about where your cancer is going to come from. When you have to know, you will. 

One year, when I was new to Selichot, I sent around a list. I knew what I had done to everyone. They, of course, had long ago forgiven me. But it’s different to pardon myself. 

At the base of the apologies I owe myself, is a youth spent trying to stay in control. I thought I had it covered. I didn’t know anything. 

S’lach lanu. Forgive us. Forgive me for thinking I had anything under control. 

That’s not the only amends I owe myself. I’m sorry I kept slipcovers on the living room couch for more than a decade. I regret that it took me years to decide to paint the kitchen, and less than a month to get the job done. 

I underestimated the pleasure that comes from pleasure; that playing the piano badly is not a crime against humanity; that nothing beats the joy of making up my own mind and paying my own way. 

I’m sorry, but I’m not guilty. I’m sorry for the false truths accepted and fun cut short without thought. I’m aware of hours spent trying to explain myself — what a waste. Years spent pursuing trivial goals — why? I was definite about ideas I knew nothing about. 

So much gets squeezed on to a hot dog.

Your Basic High Holiday FAQ


Every year they roll around, and every year you’re not quite sure what to do. Go ahead, ask us. After years of answering readers’ questions, we’ve compiled the most frequently asked ones below:

Why do synagogues charge for High Holiday tickets?

Hate to say it, but this is the most frequently asked question of all. The answer, in a nutshell: There’s no free lunch. The High Holidays are traditionally the time most Jews go to synagogue, so the ideal time to raise money to keep the synagogue afloat the rest of the year. Lights, payroll, heating, rabbis, ads in The Jewish Journal — none of it is free. See listings on page 40.

OK, so, now tell me what these holidays mean, anyway.

“Rosh Hashanah” literally translates as “head of the year.” It celebrates the creation of the world. The holiday is observed on the first day of the Hebrew month of Tishrei, which usually falls in September or October, and marks the beginning of a 10-day period of prayer, self-examination and repentance, which culminates on the fast day of Yom Kippur. These 10 days are referred to as Yamim Nora’im, the Days of Awe or the High Holidays.

Synagogue services give us time to reflect and resolve, but prayer and meditation are not enough to bring repentance. The only way to atone for sins we commit against others is by sincerely apologizing, making good our transgressions, and asking for forgiveness.

What are Selichot?

Selichot, meaning forgiveness, are penitential prayers recited by Jews prior to the onset of the High Holiday season. They prepare us for 10 days of reflection and self-examination. Sephardim begin them in Elul, and Ashkenazim on the week before Rosh Hashanah. And you can do them in any synagogue — for free.

What is Tashlich?

Usually performed on the first day of Rosh Hashanah after the afternoon service (unless it falls on the Sabbath), Tashlich is the symbolic casting away of our transgressions. We go to a flowing body of water, perform a short service asking for forgiveness and throw bread into the water (some throw rocks).

Why do we dip an apple into honey on Rosh Hashanah? And what’s with pomegranates?

Sweet apples dipped into sweet honey equal a sweet year. The numerous seeds of the pomegranates — which just happen to reach ripeness this time of year — symbolize our good deeds. Other traditional foods for this time of year are round challahs (symbolizing a complete, whole year) and, among Sephardic Jews, whole fish.

What is Yom Kippur?

Yom Kippur means “Day of Atonement.” “The tenth of this seventh month shall be the Day of Atonement for you” (Leviticus 23:27). Yom Kippur is observed by abstaining from work, by fasting and by attending communal prayers.

Why do we fast on Yom Kippur?

The Torah commands us to afflict our bodies on this holiday.

Why do we blow the shofar?

The shofar is made from a ram’s horn. It is sounded every morning during the month preceding Rosh Hashanah, on Rosh Hashanah itself and again at the conclusion of Yom Kippur. Its piercing sound is a “wake-up call” to repent.

What is Kol Nidre?

Erev Yom Kippur services begin with Kol Nidre, the opening prayer and also the name of the evening service. Kol Nidre is an Aramaic declaration that nullifies all the vows and promises that each person will make to God and to him/herself in the coming year, an acknowledgment of the weakness of human resolution. Wearing white is common on Kol Nidre as a symbol of purity.

What is Yizkor?

Yizkor is a service that recalls loved ones who have died and is recited on Yom Kippur.

How do we atone for our sins?

Yom Kippur atones only for sins between humanity and God, not for sins against another person. To atone for sins against another person, you must first apologize, righting the wrongs you committed if possible. This must all be done before the conclusion of Yom Kippur.

What is the Jewish definition of sin?

In Judaism, the word “sin” has different connotations than it does in our wider culture. “Sin” in Judaism is generally not something for which a person will be punished in the afterlife, but is rather an improper act for which one can ask forgiveness — not just of God, but of other human beings, as well.

If I skip services on the High Holidays, will a lightening bolt strike me?

Yes. Just kidding. For more information, link to sites like urj.org/holidays and www.askmoses.com visit www.jewishjournal.com. — Staff Report

 

Oh So Sorry


I’m sorry I haven’t eaten more hot dogs.

Saturday is Selichot, the time when the whole Jewish world sings with Connie

Francis, “I’m sorry,” and vows to do better next time. Many of us are focused on the wrongs we’ve done to others, or even to God.

This year, however, as I contemplate in yet a new way the impact of lung cancer, there’s no one to whom I owe apology more than myself.

Yes, many of my apologies go to me. I should have eaten more hot dogs, with mustard and sauerkraut. And even more hush puppies, which in Jewish delis are hot dogs wrapped in potato knish, served best (if not only) in New York.

I know what you’re thinking: you were only watching your health. But if you want a hot dog and never give yourself a hot dog, what are you accomplishing? Fear of food is, I think, a crime against the soul, the shutting down of the appetite by which we show our confidence in being alive.

For years I refused to eat popcorn at the movies. I was a college student and deemed myself too good for plebeian food. That year, a New York theater started popping its kernels and brewing its own coffee to sell with the latest Belmondo film. Popcorn brought great enjoyment to my next James Bond movie. Sean Connery is such a hunk, and I apologized profusely to myself for having missed out on the great all-American experience — albeit without butter.

If I’m going to keep the appetite going, I have to respond to where the taste buds tingle.

Since I received a lung cancer diagnosis, I’ve been macrobiotic, lived on smoothies, Chinese herbs, Ensure shakes. But even before I was fanatic. I ate pasta with broccoli. Broccoli, with Vitamin C, may reduce breast cancer. I never smoked cigarettes, which is linked to 85 percent of lung cancers.

Today, when it might help, my body is in overdose. I avoid any food colored green. I’m no doctor, but any one of these regimens destroys appetite in all its meanings faster than a hot dog now and again. It’s the luck of the draw. Eat a hot dog or not, you can get cancer anyway. Might as well live.

And although early on I cut out sugar and dairy, ice cream is now my dinner of choice.

I begrudge myself nothing. If you don’t express your appetite, what comes next? Soon you won’t have any. A friend will ask if you want to eat by the ocean, and you won’t know. Soon enough, you miss the summer sunset, and the blooming begonia, and the loveliness of a child’s smile. It takes will to live.

More hot dogs. More fun.

Lung cancer taught me that what we do today is fun. Tomorrow the bill comes due. Develop taste. Don’t be a snob. Don’t live in regret. Don’t worry about where your cancer is going to come from. When you have to know, you will.

One year, when I was new to Selichot, I sent around a list. I knew what I had done to everyone. They, of course, had long ago forgiven me. But it’s different to pardon myself.

At the base of the apologies I owe myself, is a youth spent trying to stay in control. I thought I had it covered. I didn’t know anything.

S’lach lanu. Forgive us. Forgive me for thinking I had anything under control.

That’s not the only amends I owe myself. I’m sorry I kept slipcovers on the living room couch for more than a decade. I regret that it took me years to decide to paint the kitchen, and less than a month to get the job done.

I underestimated the pleasure that comes from pleasure; that playing the piano badly is not a crime against humanity; that nothing beats the joy of making up my own mind and paying my own way.

I’m sorry, but I’m not guilty. I’m sorry for the false truths accepted and fun cut short without thought. I’m aware of hours spent trying to explain myself — what a waste. Years spent pursuing trivial goals — why? I was definite about ideas I knew nothing about.

So much gets squeezed on to a hot dog.

The Golden Calf


We are entering the homestretch. Aug. 9 is the first of Elul, the last month in the Jewish calendar. It is a time when Jews around the world begin to prepare for the High Holy Days by saying prayers called “Selichot.” These are prayers to ask forgiveness of God. It is said that after the Israelites sinned at Mt. Sinai by worshipping the Golden Calf, Moses went back up for another 40 days and nights and prayed for forgiveness. He started on Rosh Chodesh Elul (the first day of Elul) and was forgiven on Yom Kippur.

Elul is your opportunity to think about your Golden Calf: What did you do this year that you regret? Was it a video game you became obsessed with? Was it an overwhelming desire for all your clothes to have a certain logo on them? Did your parents get mad at you because of these things, or did you neglect friends who weren’t dressed as “cool” as you were? The great thing about this month — and Yom Kippur — is that you get to make a fresh start every year!

HIGH HOLY DAYSCALENDAR


Selichot

Hebrew for forgiveness, Selichot services are a time of preparation for the New Year, generally held after the conclusion of Shabbat prior to Rosh Hashanah.

Sat./September 23

Kehillat Israel: 10 p.m. “Becoming and Believing” Selichot service 16019 Sunset Blvd., Pacific Palisades. (310) 459-2328.

Temple Aliyah: 8:30 p.m. Reception. 10 p.m. Selichot service. 6025 Valley Circle Blvd., Woodland Hills. (818) 346-3445.

Beth Chayim Chadashim: 10 p.m. 6000 W. Pico Blvd., Los Angeles. (323) 931-7023.

Leo Baeck Temple: 8 p.m. Introduction to the High Holy Days, study and Selichot service. 1300 North Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 476-2861.

Temple Isaiah: 9 p.m. Dessert reception followed by Selichot service. 10345 West Pico Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 277-2772.

Congregation Kol Ami: 6:30 p.m. Casual Selichot dinner. $10. 7:30 p.m. Service and study session. 7350 Sunset Blvd., West Hollywood. RSVP for dinner or for more information, call (310) 248-6320.

Temple Ahavat Shalom: 8 p.m. Selichot service and study. 18200 Rinaldi Pl., Northridge. For more information, call (818) 360-2258.

University Synagogue: 9:30 p.m. Selichot program and service. 11960 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 472-1255.

Temple Emanuel: 7 p.m. “Stop and Smell the Spices (Selichot version).” Shabbat and High Holy Day preparation. 8844 Burton Way, Beverly Hills. (310) 274-6388.

Congregation Tifereth Jacob: 10:30 p.m. “The Jew in the Lotus,” movie and discussion. 1829 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Manhattan Beach. (310) 546-3667.

B’nai David-Judea Congregation: 10 p.m. Selichot service and study. 8906 W. Pico Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 276-9269.

Temple Bat Yahm: 8 p.m. Dessert reception. 8:45 p.m. “God’s Greatest Message to Humankind” Lecture by Rabbi Mark Miller. 9:30 p.m. Selichot service. 1011 Camelback St., Newport Beach. (949) 644-1999.

B’nai Tikvah Congregation: 9:30 p.m. Havdallah and High Holy Day workshop, followed by Selichot services. 5820 W. Manchester Ave., Los Angeles. (310) 645-6262.

Valley Beth Israel: 9 p.m. Social and study session. 10 p.m. Selichot services. 13060 Roscoe Blvd., Sun Valley. (818) 792-2281.

Temple B’nai Hayim: 8 p.m. Havdallah. 8:30 p.m. Dinner. 9:30 p.m. Ritual Activities. 10:30 p.m. Selichot service. $7.50 for dinner. 4302 Van Nuys Blvd., Sherman Oaks. (818) 788-4664.

Temple Ner Tamid of Downey, Adat Chaverim, and Temple Beth Shalom: 10 p.m. The congregations join for Selichot service, dessert potluck and concert. Temple Beth Shalom, 14564 E. Hawes St., Whittier. For more information, call (562) 861-9276.

Congregation Mishkon Tephilo: 10 p.m. Selichot service. 206 Main St., Venice. (310) 392-3029.

Temple Beth Torah: 8 p.m. Selichot program with film and discussion. 10 p.m. Selichot service. 16651 Rinaldi St., Granada Hills. (818) 831-0835.

Congregation B’nai Tzedek: 8:30 p.m. Selichot program followed by midnight service. 9669 Talbert Ave., Fountain Valley. (714) 963-4611.

Congregation Shir Ha-Ma’alot: 11 p.m. Outdoor Selichot service. 3652 Michelson, Irvine. (949) 857-2226.

Kehillat Ma’arav: 10 p.m. Selichot service. 1715 21st St., Santa Monica. (310) 829-0566.

Yeshiva of Los Angeles: 12:20 a.m. Rabbi Sauer will speak prior to Selichot service. 9760 W. Pico Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 772-2487.

Rosh Hashanah

Chabad of Burbank: Fri. 7 p.m.; Sat. 10 a.m., 7 p.m.; Sun. 10 a.m., 7 p.m. 1921 W. Magnolia, Burbank. For more information, call (818) 954-0070.

Chabad of Cheviot Hills: Fri. 6:45 p.m.; Sat. 10:30 a.m., 6:45 p.m.; Sun. 10:30 a.m. 3280 Motor Ave. (310) 837-8083.

Chabad of Greater Los Feliz: Fri. 6:30 p.m. Los Feliz Library, 1801 Hillhurst Ave.; Sat. 9 a.m. Los Feliz Elementary School, 1740 N. New Hampshire Ave.; Sat. 7 p.m. Chabad House, 1932 N. New Hampshire Ave. For more information, call (323) 660-5177.

Congregation Or Ami: Sat. 2 p.m. Family/children’s service at Agoura Hills/Calabasas Community Center. For more information, call (818) 880-6818.

Temple Beth Ohr: Fri. 8 p.m.; Sat. 10 a.m. 15721 Rosecrans Ave., La Mirada. (714) 521-6765.

Westwood Kehilla: Explanatory services, Sat. and Sun. ADL Building, 10495 Santa Monica Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 441-5289.

Temple Isaiah of Newport Beach: Fri. 8 p.m.; Sat. 9:30 a.m.; Sun. 9:30 a.m. 2401 Irvine Ave., Newport Beach. (949) 548-6900.

Temple Beth Emet: Fri. 6:45 p.m.; Sat. 8:30 a.m.; Sun. 8:30 a.m. 1770 W. Cerritos Ave., Anaheim. (714) 772-4720.

Congregation Mishkon Tephilo: Fri. 6:10 p.m.; Sat. 8:30 a.m.; Sun. 8:30 a.m. 206 Main St., Venice. (310) 392-3029.

Temple Ner Tamid of Downey: Fri. 7:30 p.m.; Sat. 10 a.m.; Sun. 10 a.m. 10629 Lakewood Blvd., Downey. (562) 861-9276.

The Laugh Factory: Sat. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. 8001 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood. (323) 656-1336.

Shir Hadash Reform Jewish Community: Services and meditation. Fri. 8 p.m.; Sat. 10:30 a.m. Zen Center of Los Angeles, 923 S. Normandie Ave., Los Angeles. (310) 456-5323.

B’nai Tikvah Congregation: Fri. 7:45 p.m.; Sat. 9 a.m.; Sun. 9 a.m. 5820 W. Manchester Ave., Westchester. (310) 645-6262.

Other Services and Events

Sat./September 23

Temple Beth Emet: 10 p.m. “L’Chayim, To Life,” musical program with Stuart Rogoff, followed by dessert reception and midnight Selichot services. 1770 W. Cerritos Ave., Anaheim. For reservations or more information, call (714) 772-4720.

Temple Etz Chaim: 8 p.m. Havdallah services. 9:15 p.m. “Yeshiva for the High Holy Days,” with a variety of discussion groups and study sessions for all ages. 11:30 p.m. Selichot services. 1080 Janss Rd., Thousand Oaks. (805) 497-6891.

Sun./September 24

Skirball Cultural Center: 2 p.m. “Greet the New Year” holiday art workshop for ages four and up. $5 per child. 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles. For reservations, call (310) 440-4636.

Westwood Kehilla: 9:15 a.m. “Teshuva for Dummies: A Maimonidean How-To Guide.” 10:30 a.m. “What You’ve Always Been Praying For,” a preview of the Rosh Hashanah prayerbook. 10523 Santa Monica Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 441-5288.

University of Judaism Extension: 7 p.m. “The Quarrel,” film and discussion. $18. For more information, call (310) 440-1246.

Tues./September 26

Westwood Kehilla: 8 p.m. “Days of Awe – Or Awful Days,” one-on-one study of personal growth and the High Holidays. 10523 Santa Monica Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 441-5289.

The Jewish Learning Exchange: 7:30 p.m. “Laws and Customs of Rosh Hashanah” 8:15 p.m. “Judgement of the Afterlife.” Young Israel of Hancock Park, 225 S. LaBrea Ave., Los Angeles. For more information, call (323) 857-0923.

Wed./September 27

Conejo Jewish Academy: 8 p.m. First of a three lecture series on Jewish Holidays. Also October 4, 11. $18 for the series. 30345 Canwood St., Agoura Hills. (818) 991-0991.

Women’s American ORT, Westridge chapter: 6 p.m. Dinner and business meeting, followed by a High Holy Day spiritual journey with Rabbi Mark Borovitz. IHOP, 19100 Ventura Blvd., Tarzana. For more information, call (818) 881-9370.

Sat./September 30

Workmen’s Circle/Arbeter Ring: 3 p.m. Jewish New Year program of music and song, in the secular Yiddish tradition. 1525 S. Robertson Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 552-2007.

Sun./October 1

Chabad of the Conejo: 5 p.m. “Tashlich Walk,” following the tradition of visiting a body of water containing live fish, to symbolically cast away sins. Walk begins at Hyatt Westlake Plaza Hotel. For more information, call (818) 991-0991.

Leo Baeck Temple: 10 a.m.-noon. Interactive, family-oriented Rosh Hashanah experience with storytelling, arts and crafts, music and more. 1300 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 476-2861.

Sholem Community: 11 a.m. Secular, humanistic Rosh Hashana observance, followed by a picnic at 12:30 p.m. Culver City Middle School, 4601 Elenda Ave. Picnic at Coombs Park, across the street. (310) 202-6546.

Peace, It’s Wonderful


Selichot

Hebrew for forgiveness, Selichot services are a time of preparation for the New Year, generally held after the conclusion of Shabbat prior to Rosh Hashanah.

Sat./September 23

Kehillat Israel: 10 p.m. “Becoming and Believing” Selichot service 16019 Sunset Blvd., Pacific Palisades. (310) 459-2328.

Temple Aliyah: 8:30 p.m. Reception. 10 p.m. Selichot service. 6025 Valley Circle Blvd., Woodland Hills. (818) 346-3445.

Beth Chayim Chadashim: 10 p.m. 6000 W. Pico Blvd., Los Angeles. (323) 931-7023.

Leo Baeck Temple: 8 p.m. Introduction to the High Holy Days, study and Selichot service. 1300 North Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 476-2861.

Temple Isaiah: 9 p.m. Dessert reception followed by Selichot service. 10345 West Pico Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 277-2772.

Congregation Kol Ami: 6:30 p.m. Casual Selichot dinner. $10. 7:30 p.m. Service and study session. 7350 Sunset Blvd., West Hollywood. RSVP for dinner or for more information, call (310) 248-6320.

Temple Ahavat Shalom: 8 p.m. Selichot service and study. 18200 Rinaldi Pl., Northridge. For more information, call (818) 360-2258.

University Synagogue: 9:30 p.m. Selichot program and service. 11960 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 472-1255.

Temple Emanuel: 7 p.m. “Stop and Smell the Spices (Selichot version).” Shabbat and High Holy Day preparation. 8844 Burton Way, Beverly Hills. (310) 274-6388.

Congregation Tifereth Jacob: 10:30 p.m. “The Jew in the Lotus,” movie and discussion. 1829 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Manhattan Beach. (310) 546-3667.

B’nai David-Judea Congregation: 10 p.m. Selichot service and study. 8906 W. Pico Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 276-9269.

Temple Bat Yahm: 8 p.m. Dessert reception. 8:45 p.m. “God’s Greatest Message to Humankind” Lecture by Rabbi Mark Miller. 9:30 p.m. Selichot service. 1011 Camelback St., Newport Beach. (949) 644-1999.

B’nai Tikvah Congregation: 9:30 p.m. Havdallah and High Holy Day workshop, followed by Selichot services. 5820 W. Manchester Ave., Los Angeles. (310) 645-6262.

Valley Beth Israel: 9 p.m. Social and study session. 10 p.m. Selichot services. 13060 Roscoe Blvd., Sun Valley. (818) 792-2281.

Temple B’nai Hayim: 8 p.m. Havdallah. 8:30 p.m. Dinner. 9:30 p.m. Ritual Activities. 10:30 p.m. Selichot service. $7.50 for dinner. 4302 Van Nuys Blvd., Sherman Oaks. (818) 788-4664.

Temple Ner Tamid of Downey, Adat Chaverim, and Temple Beth Shalom: 10 p.m. The congregations join for Selichot service, dessert potluck and concert. Temple Beth Shalom, 14564 E. Hawes St., Whittier. For more information, call (562) 861-9276.

Congregation Mishkon Tephilo: 10 p.m. Selichot service. 206 Main St., Venice. (310) 392-3029.

Temple Beth Torah: 8 p.m. Selichot program with film and discussion. 10 p.m. Selichot service. 16651 Rinaldi St., Granada Hills. (818) 831-0835.

Congregation B’nai Tzedek: 8:30 p.m. Selichot program followed by midnight service. 9669 Talbert Ave., Fountain Valley. (714) 963-4611.

Congregation Shir Ha-Ma’alot: 11 p.m. Outdoor Selichot service. 3652 Michelson, Irvine. (949) 857-2226.

Kehillat Ma’arav: 10 p.m. Selichot service. 1715 21st St., Santa Monica. (310) 829-0566.

Yeshiva of Los Angeles: 12:20 a.m. Rabbi Sauer will speak prior to Selichot service. 9760 W. Pico Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 772-2487.

Rosh Hashanah

Chabad of Burbank: Fri. 7 p.m.; Sat. 10 a.m., 7 p.m.; Sun. 10 a.m., 7 p.m. 1921 W. Magnolia, Burbank. For more information, call (818) 954-0070.

Chabad of Cheviot Hills: Fri. 6:45 p.m.; Sat. 10:30 a.m., 6:45 p.m.; Sun. 10:30 a.m. 3280 Motor Ave. (310) 837-8083.

Chabad of Greater Los Feliz: Fri. 6:30 p.m. Los Feliz Library, 1801 Hillhurst Ave.; Sat. 9 a.m. Los Feliz Elementary School, 1740 N. New Hampshire Ave.; Sat. 7 p.m. Chabad House, 1932 N. New Hampshire Ave. For more information, call (323) 660-5177.

Congregation Or Ami: Sat. 2 p.m. Family/children’s service at Agoura Hills/Calabasas Community Center. For more information, call (818) 880-6818.

Temple Beth Ohr: Fri. 8 p.m.; Sat. 10 a.m. 15721 Rosecrans Ave., La Mirada. (714) 521-6765.

Westwood Kehilla: Explanatory services, Sat. and Sun. ADL Building, 10495 Santa Monica Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 441-5289.

Temple Isaiah of Newport Beach: Fri. 8 p.m.; Sat. 9:30 a.m.; Sun. 9:30 a.m. 2401 Irvine Ave., Newport Beach. (949) 548-6900.

Temple Beth Emet: Fri. 6:45 p.m.; Sat. 8:30 a.m.; Sun. 8:30 a.m. 1770 W. Cerritos Ave., Anaheim. (714) 772-4720.

Congregation Mishkon Tephilo: Fri. 6:10 p.m.; Sat. 8:30 a.m.; Sun. 8:30 a.m. 206 Main St., Venice. (310) 392-3029.

Temple Ner Tamid of Downey: Fri. 7:30 p.m.; Sat. 10 a.m.; Sun. 10 a.m. 10629 Lakewood Blvd., Downey. (562) 861-9276.

The Laugh Factory: Sat. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. 8001 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood. (323) 656-1336.

Shir Hadash Reform Jewish Community: Services and meditation. Fri. 8 p.m.; Sat. 10:30 a.m. Zen Center of Los Angeles, 923 S. Normandie Ave., Los Angeles. (310) 456-5323.

B’nai Tikvah Congregation: Fri. 7:45 p.m.; Sat. 9 a.m.; Sun. 9 a.m. 5820 W. Manchester Ave., Westchester. (310) 645-6262.

Other Services and Events

Sat./September 23

Temple Beth Emet: 10 p.m. “L’Chayim, To Life,” musical program with Stuart Rogoff, followed by dessert reception and midnight Selichot services. 1770 W. Cerritos Ave., Anaheim. For reservations or more information, call (714) 772-4720.

Temple Etz Chaim: 8 p.m. Havdallah services. 9:15 p.m. “Yeshiva for the High Holy Days,” with a variety of discussion groups and study sessions for all ages. 11:30 p.m. Selichot services. 1080 Janss Rd., Thousand Oaks. (805) 497-6891.

Sun./September 24

Skirball Cultural Center: 2 p.m. “Greet the New Year” holiday art workshop for ages four and up. $5 per child. 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles. For reservations, call (310) 440-4636.

Westwood Kehilla: 9:15 a.m. “Teshuva for Dummies: A Maimonidean How-To Guide.” 10:30 a.m. “What You’ve Always Been Praying For,” a preview of the Rosh Hashanah prayerbook. 10523 Santa Monica Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 441-5288.

University of Judaism Extension: 7 p.m. “The Quarrel,” film and discussion. $18. For more information, call (310) 440-1246.

Tues./September 26

Westwood Kehilla: 8 p.m. “Days of Awe – Or Awful Days,” one-on-one study of personal growth and the High Holidays. 10523 Santa Monica Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 441-5289.

The Jewish Learning Exchange: 7:30 p.m. “Laws and Customs of Rosh Hashanah” 8:15 p.m. “Judgement of the Afterlife.” Young Israel of Hancock Park, 225 S. LaBrea Ave., Los Angeles. For more information, call (323) 857-0923.

Wed./September 27

Conejo Jewish Academy: 8 p.m. First of a three lecture series on Jewish Holidays. Also October 4, 11. $18 for the series. 30345 Canwood St., Agoura Hills. (818) 991-0991.

Women’s American ORT, Westridge chapter: 6 p.m. Dinner and business meeting, followed by a High Holy Day spiritual journey with Rabbi Mark Borovitz. IHOP, 19100 Ventura Blvd., Tarzana. For more information, call (818) 881-9370.

Sat./September 30

Workmen’s Circle/Arbeter Ring: 3 p.m. Jewish New Year program of music and song, in the secular Yiddish tradition. 1525 S. Robertson Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 552-2007.

Sun./October 1

Chabad of the Conejo: 5 p.m. “Tashlich Walk,” following the tradition of visiting a body of water containing live fish, to symbolically cast away sins. Walk begins at Hyatt Westlake Plaza Hotel. For more information, call (818) 991-0991.

Leo Baeck Temple: 10 a.m.-noon. Interactive, family-oriented Rosh Hashanah experience with storytelling, arts and crafts, music and more. 1300 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 476-2861.

Sholem Community: 11 a.m. Secular, humanistic Rosh Hashana observance, followed by a picnic at 12:30 p.m. Culver City Middle School, 4601 Elenda Ave. Picnic at Coombs Park, across the street. (310) 202-6546.