Kids Page


Workers of the World, Relax

Labor Day is Sept. 5. We think of all the people who work hard to feed their families. Jews have always been very involved in helping those who are in need. They have established labor unions; they have fought for fair wages; they have led movements to improve factory conditions. There is an expression in Hebrew: Kol Yisrael arevim zeh lazeh — All of Israel is responsible for each other. Have you done something to help those in need? We want to know about it. Send your mitvah moments to abbygilad@yahoo.com.

Speaking of jobs, there are some really interesting ones out there. The following jobs are all mixed up. Put the right words together for some great ideas for your fun future.

CRUISE MAKER

FOREST DIRECTOR

PASTA INSTRUCTOR

SKI ARTIST

VOICEOVER RANGER

Riddle Me This

Q: Which Jew was the worst lawbreaker of all time?

A: Moses, because he broke all 10 commandments at once!

Remember

Don’t forget to send in your Amazing Summer Contest Entry. Send a story and a photo. The winner will get their story published and receive a gift certificate.

 

Yeladim


Vatch Out! It’s Zee Count !

Passover eez my favorite time of zee year, because I get to start counting. Do you know vat it eez that I vant to count? Here is a teeny veeny hint: 5, 12, 30, 51 – These numbers correspond to letters in this paragraph. Start counting!

Riddle Me This

Solve this riddle I wrote for you – and send me the answer, too:

You can save it and waste it,
Buy it and take it,
You can do it and give it,
You can spend it,
The Jewish genius says you can bend it,
But you can’t lend it!

(Hint: it’s kind of connected to counting.)

Send your answer to abbygilad@yahoo.com for an ice cream certificate – the count just loves biting into those cones! One scoop, two scoop, three scoops, ha ha ha!

 

Yeladim


 

The Fire of Money

In Parshat Ki Tisa, each Israelite is instructed to give a half-shekel to the “temple fund” every year. There is a midrash – a story told by rabbis to teach a lesson – about this portion. Rabbis say that God took a fiery coin from under His heavenly throne, showed it to Moses and said: “Like this shall they give.”

What can we learn from the image of a fiery coin? The rabbis say that fire can be destructive if misused, but can be very useful and beneficial if used properly. And so it is with money. Perhaps money is – or can be – the “root of all evil,” but it can also be used for charity and acts of kindness.

Back Words

Solve the clues. The second answer is the first answer written backwards!

Give money

– – –

A high-pitch bark

– – –

A Yiddle Riddle

Turn the following description into two words.

A scratchy inflammation in the middle of your body.

Now, put the two together to get one Hebrew word and one big prize!

Being Jewish in America

Written by a fifth grade,

Emek Hebrew Academy

It is difficult sometimes to be one of a small number of Jews in America and in L.A., especially around Christmastime, when a lot of stores are sporting trees, lights, etc. Yet, somehow, my family manages to celebrate Shabbat, keep kosher and go to a Jewish school. There are lots of churches in L.A., but there are also a lot of shuls and Jewish organizations that make it easier and more fun to be a Jewish American!

 

For the Kids


Nuturing Nature

Last week, we learned not to cut down the fruit trees of our enemies in times of war because, as the Torah says, the trees are “not our enemy.”

In this week’s parshah, Ki Tetze, the Torah continues its compassionate attitude toward nature’s creatures: Do not pull a baby bird out of its nest when its mother is around. If you have to do it (because you need to eat) do it when the mother is away from the nest.

It also reminds us to help — not ignore — an animal that has fallen down in the road. The Torah says to always be considerate and think about how your actions will affect the people and creatures around you.

Poetry Corner

Liat Chesed, 71¼2, of Los Angeles, writes:

I like to grow trees.

They’re beautiful and so green.

I plant and I plant.

I feel like a tree.

A Yiddle Riddle

Rabbi Levy was getting ready for synagogue in the month of Elul. All of a sudden, he heard a car honking its horn. He looked outside and there was a limousine with a driver parked outside his house. He realized that his students had misunderstood his request.

What had the rabbi asked for and what did his students bring him instead? (Hint: Two similar words — one in Hebrew and one in English.)

Send your answer to kids@jewishjournal.com .

The winner will receive a gift certificate to Baskin-Robbins.

Kids Page


Before Pesach, we get rid of all the chametz in our homes. Chametz is anything that rises, like bread. So the night before Pesach, after the whole house has been cleaned, we hide 10 small pieces of bread around the house and search for them by candlelight. You know, at the seder, we search for something too. This time, it is not bread we look for, but matzah! We search for the afikomen. Whoever finds it wins a prize!
Find the afikomen!


The Yiddle Riddle

Q: What happened to Pharaoh’s blue sandal when he dipped it in the Red Sea?
A: It got wet!

Sent in by
Adam Slomiak, 12,
Thousand Oaks

What You Leave Behind


Can you think of someone who used to live in your neighborhood or went to your school but moved away? How did you feel when they moved? Was the person who left someone who did nice things for people? Was he or she helpful?

Inventive? Was it fun to play with that person? Then you probably miss him or her a little bit. Now think: What if you moved away? What kind of impression would you leave behind? Would people miss you?

Answer that question to yourself — and be honest. It might be time to say: “I should be a little more helpful” or “Yeah, I’m a good kid.”


Riddle Me This!
Here’s a Riddle.
E-mail the answer

Charan is the name of the town that
Abraham left and Jacob returns to in order to find a wife. Mount Ararat is where Noah’s Ark landed. In which country can we find both of these biblical sites?

Hint: The answer has something to do with an upcoming holiday.

The Jewish
Joke Box

Moishe was
walking in the woods.
Suddenly, a bear appeared
and chased him. When the
bear cornered him, Moishe
thought his life is over until he
saw the bear take out a yarmulke
and put it on his head.
“Oh, good,” he thought,
“he’s a Jewish bear.
He won’t eat me.”
Then the bear said:
“Hamotzi lechem min ha’aretz.”
(The blessing before eating a meal.)

Submitted by:
Camille Fagan, 10
Oak Park

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