Families of murdered Iranian nuclear scientists file lawsuit


The families of several slain Iranian nuclear scientists filed a lawsuit accusing Israel, the U.S. and Britain of being involved in their assassinations.

“Through this complaint, we declare to the world that actions of arrogant governments, led by the U.S., Britain and the occupying Zionist regime, in assassinating nuclear scientists and elites is against human principles,” Mansoureh Karami, the wife of slain Tehran University physics professor Masoud Ali Mohammadi, said at a news conference Wednesday in Tehran, according to The Associated Press.

Mohammadi is one of five Iranian nuclear scientists who have been killed since 2010, and Iran repeatedly has blamed Israel’s Mossad intelligency agency as well as the CIA and Britain’s MI6 for the assassinations, with support from some of Iran’s neighbors. The U.S. and Britain have denied involvement in the slayings. Israel has neither confirmed nor denied its involvement.

In May, Iran executed 24-year-old Majid Jamali Fashi for the assassination of Mohammadi and spying for Israel. Mohammadi was killed by a remote-controlled bomb in January 2010.

In April, more than 15 Iranian and foreign nationals reportedly were arrested for carrying out alleged terrorist missions for Israel in Iran, according to the Islamic Republic News Agency, Iran’s official news service. The group was accused of spying for Israel, the attempted assassination of an Iranian expert and sabotage.

The state-backed Fars news agency said the lawsuit stressed that the deaths of the scientists would not undermine Iran’s progress because Iranian youths will double their efforts to make more achievements in scientific and technological fields.

Western powers accuse Iran of trying to build nuclear weapons, while Iran says it is attempting to build reactors for peaceful purposes such as power and medical isotopes.

U.S. reportedly tells Iran: Strait closing is ‘red line’


The United States relayed a message to Iran that blocking the Strait of Hormuz would be a “red line,” the New York Times reported.

The newspaper reported Friday that there is considerable skepticism in the Obama administration and among the military that Iran would go through with threats to shut the strait, through which much of the world’s oil must pass, if only because Iran would effectively cut off its own oil trade by doing so.

Nonetheless, the threat was deemed important enough to convey to Iran through secret channels that such a shutting would prompt a military response.

Iran issued the threats in the wake of a series of steps the Obama administration has taken in recent weeks to intensify sanctions until Iran agrees to make more transparent its suspected nuclear weapons program.

A number of media outlets are reporting this week that Iran has agreed to reopen discussions later this month about its nuclear program, which it maintains is purely civilian in nature, with the International Atomic Energy Agency.

With killing of another nukes scientist, Iran again blames Israel


Iranian officials are blaming Israel for an attack in Tehran that killed a nuclear scientist.

Mostafa Ahmadi Roshan, 32, was killed Wednesday when a bomb placed on his car by a motorcyclist exploded. Roshan reportedly was a supervisor at the Natanz uranium enrichment facility, in addition to being a professor at Tehran’s technical university.

“The bomb was a magnetic one and the same as the ones previously used for the assassination of the scientists, and the work of the Zionists,” the semi-official Fars news agency quoted Tehran’s Deputy Governor Safarali Baratloo as saying. Fars called the explosion a terrorist attack.

At least four Iranian nuclear scientists have been killed in anonymous attacks since January 2010. Iranian officials have blamed Israel and the United States for the attacks.

Iran’s Atomic Energy Organization said in a statement that the killing was “a heinous act” and that “We will continue our (nuclear) path without any doubt … Our path is irreversible,” Reuters reported.

Israeli media reported Tuesday that Israel Defense Forces’ Chief of General Staff Lt.-Gen. Benny Gantz said in an address to a closed Knesset committee that Iran should expect more “unnatural” events in 2012.

Iran’s top nuclear official said the country was about to start production at its second major uranium enrichment site.

Iran announced last week that it would begin uranium enrichment at an underground nuclear facility located near the holy city of Qom.