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Letters to the editor, week of June 12


Kudos to the Journal

Thank you for important information covering many topics. As an African-American female Jew, I’m feeling pressure from all sides. I’m glad you’re out there.

The article about Michael Twitty: Thank you (“A Taste of Black History and a Side of Jewish Culture,” March 31).

Laura D. Joyner
Los Angeles

… or Not

Lately, I hate to take your paper in hand because it is more political than Jewish.

I find the same vitriolic remarks as Sen. Chuck Schumer’s, audacious and calumnious, insulting our president.

You also are insulting your other readers who value and respect Donald Trump.

The only Jew at heart in your newspaper is David Suissa. He lived in another country as a Jew, and he understands the plight of Judaism better than anybody else.

Tame your horses, get a feeling for your readers.

Elvira Schwartz
Los Angeles

Foundation Forging Change With Grants

I want to commend the Journal for the important public service provided through its coverage of the inaugural Los Angeles edition of Slingshot, A Resource Guide to Jewish Innovation (“New L.A. Guide Spotlights Top Jewish Nonprofits,” June 9). Since its inception, Slingshot has become the Michelin Guide of Jewish social innovation, serving an instrumental role in calling attention to and recognition for initiatives that are reimagining and reanimating our communities. It is an invaluable resource for, among other purposes, engaging volunteers and highlighting funding opportunities for prospective donors.

As Slingshot Executive Director Stefanie Rhodes rightly notes, Los Angeles is at the epicenter of Jewish social entrepreneurship. Consequently, the Jewish Community Foundation of Los Angeles (The Foundation) is duly proud to be a sponsor of the new Los Angeles edition. It makes me prouder still that 15 of the 26 organizations featured on the local list — and no fewer than five in the Slingshot national edition — were recipients of significant seed funding from The Foundation in the form of our annual Cutting Edge Grants. This support has enabled the launch of many of the listed organizations as well as the creation of catalytic new initiatives within established institutions. Since 2006, we have awarded more than $15 million to more than 80 innovative local programs that engage and forge inclusive pathways into local Jewish life.

These social entrepreneurs and their organizations’ lay leaders are igniting the flame beneath the local Jewish future. It’s a fire that burns brightly and will serve as a beacon for us all.

Marvin I. Schotland
President and Chief Executive Officer
Jewish Community Foundation of Los Angeles

Prager Should Know Better

Once upon a time, before Dennis Prager blamed all things negative on liberals, he would tell his radio audiences that he deplores generalization.

I’m a liberal and Prager doesn’t know me. Moreover, to the best of my knowledge, he doesn’t know any of my family or friends. And I doubt he knows “all” liberals he condemns. Because some of us don’t agree with every observation he expounds upon doesn’t make all of us responsible for destruction of Western civilization.

Prager should stay true to who he says he is. All liberals, all Jews, all ‘whatevers’ are always on the wrong side of an issue. Generalizing, and its next step down, stereotyping, is the stuff of ignorance. Isn’t a recognized great thinker like Prager beyond that?

Joe Siegman
Los Angeles

History Brought to Life

As Bob Hope would sing, “Thanks for the Memory.”

I loved the Journal using the cover story of the old Heritage Southwest Jewish Press from June ’67 with its own story (“Los Angeles Rallied Around Israel in ’67,” June 2). It was a joy to read Tom Tugend recalling his Jewish journalistic roots on 2130 S. Vermont Ave. (Heritage’s editorial office), not far from the old Jewish Federation building.

I hope to see Tugend’s byline in the Journal for many years. He is living Jewish history in his own incredible life.

Reuven Davidson
Jerusalem

First-Person Stories

The recent addition of a mini personal story at the last page of every Jewish Journal is a real winner. I never miss it — truly great stories that trump (excuse the pun) so much of what passes for worthwhile news these days.

I am impressed … really.

Arnold Ross
via email

Israel’s Foreign Ministry tells diplomats to refuse mail with ‘problematic’ terms


Israel's Foreign Ministry has instructed its diplomats to refuse to accept any official mail that uses “problematic terminology” such as the “state of Palestine.”

The instructions come ahead of Thursday's scheduled vote in the United Nations General Assembly on the Palestinians' request to elevate their status to non-member observer state, Ynet reported.

Other problematic terms include “occupied Palestine,” “occupied Jerusalem” and “occupied territories.” Palestinian Authority territories is an acceptable term, according to Ynet, which cited Foreign Ministry employee Galia Levanon.

All the terms have appeared in official letters from international organizations and foreign ministries, according to the report.

Letters containing the unacceptable terminology should be returned to the sender with a request that it be revised, according to Ynet.

Meanwhile, the Israeli media is reporting that Israeli will not pull out of the agreements of the Oslo Accords if the request for upgraded U.N. status is passed, as had been threatened. Other possible responses include calling in the Palestinians' debts, according to the Times of Israel.

Canada suspends Gaza mail delivery


Canada’s post office has suspended mail delivery to the Gaza Strip.

In a statement on its website, Canada Post said it has been informed by its counterpart in Israel that “due to circumstances beyond their control, mail service to the Gaza Strip is currently unavailable.”

Canada Post says it has been unable to find “alternate routes” to deliver mail to the area.

“Our efforts to get mail through to the Gaza Strip will continue, and we will keep customers updated on developments through our website,” the statement said.

All Gaza-bound mail accepted by Canada Post that is undeliverable will be returned to sender. Once mail service in the Gaza Strip resumes, customers will be able to re-mail their items at no additional charge.

Canada Post did not provide a reason for the interruption, but spokesman John Caines told the QMI news agency that when there is a war or conflict in a foreign destination, domestic postal services are notified through the International Postal Union.

An estimated 24,000 people of Palestinian descent reside in Canada.

Somalia is the only country to which Canada Post does not deliver any mail, according to the Ottawa Citizen. Surface delivery, in which letters and parcels are delivered by sea, also is unavailable in Iraq, Lebanon and East Timor, according to Canada Post.