Calendar: January 20-26


FRI | JAN 20

SHABBAT TRIBUTE TO MLK

Celebrate the life and legacy of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. at Kol Tikvah, with Rabbi Jon Hanish and Cantor Noa Shaashua. Special guests Dr. Dee and the Sacred Praise Chorale, one of Los Angeles’ premier gospel choirs, will also be featured. Everyone is welcome to attend this soulful event. Followed by socializing, sweet treats and coffee. 6:30 p.m. Free. Kol Tikvah, 20400 Ventura Blvd., Woodland Hills. (818)348-0670. koltikvah.org.

SHISHI ISRAELI

Bring family and friends for a Shishi Israeli celebration at the IAC Shepher Community Center, which has undergone a major renovation. There will be a kosher dinner, activities and live music. 6:30 p.m. $21 for adults; $13 for children. IAC Shepher Community Center, 6530 Winnetka Ave., Woodland Hills. israeliamerican.org.

SAT | JAN 21

WOMEN’S MARCH

If you support human rights, tolerance and compassion for humanity, join in this diverse event, which will start at Pershing Square (532 S. Olive St.) and end at City Hall (200 N. Spring St., Los Angeles). 9 a.m. Free. Downtown Los Angeles. (310) 200-0124. womensmarchla.org.

“NOURISHING TRADITION”

Gain insight into how Jewish artists think about food, home and traditions at the new exhibit “Nourishing Tradition.” It will feature paintings and sculptural assemblies by artists including Judy Dekel, Harriete Estel Berman, Betty Green, Harriet Glaser, Benny Ferdman, Marleene Rubenstein, Marilee Tolwin and Penny Wolin. The evening includes a reception and an artist talk. 6:30 p.m. reception; 7 p.m. artist talk. Free. Through March 5. The Braid, 2912 Colorado Ave., No. 102, Santa Monica. (310) 315-1400. jewishwomenstheatre.org.

“THE MATZO BALL DIARIES”

In “The Matzo Ball Diaries,” 15 professional and amateur writers reveal funny and poignant moments about the power of food. A boy decides to give up certain Jewish foods in order to lose weight, but will he lose his religion after he loses weight? Another man begins a food franchise only to realize the impact he has had on Americans. These and other moving stories will be presented at a variety of venues. 8 p.m. $40. The Braid, 2912 Colorado Ave., No. 102, Santa Monica. Additional shows presented at synagogues throughout Los Angeles. (310) 315-1400. jewishwomenstheatre.org.

SUN | JAN 22

“CHAMPIONING CIVIL RIGHTS & RESISTING INJUSTICE”

The late Rabbi Joachim Prinz and composer Kurt Weill were German-Jewish emigres who fled Nazi Germany for the United States. This symposium will put the lives and works of these two men in conversation. Their shared historical foundation for social justice will be explored as well as each individual’s contribution to the world. The event is part of the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra’s “Lift Every Voice” festival. Followed by a concert in Royce Hall. 9:30 a.m. Free. UCLA, 314 Royce Hall, Los Angeles. (310) 267-5327. cjs.ucla.edu.

RUNNING CLUSTER

Join Young Adults of Los Angeles’ Running Cluster for a four-mile run up Sunset Boulevard, past the outskirts of Bel Air and through the heart of Westwood. Meet afterward at Nekter Juice Bar (10912 Lindbrook Drive, Westwood Village) for a juice or bite to eat. 9:30 a.m. Free. UCLA, 10899 Le Conte Ave., Los Angeles. (323) 761-8000. yala.org.

“LARRY BELL: PACIFIC RED”

The Frederick R. Weisman Museum of Art at Pepperdine University presents “Larry Bell: Pacific Red.” There will be a reception to meet Bell, who was a founder of the California Light and Space movement in the 1960s. He has pushed the boundaries of perception and technology in his mission to explore light and vision. “Pacific Red” features a historical survey of his art from the 1950s and ’60s as well as a new installation designed for the galleries at the Weisman Museum of Art. 2 p.m. Free. Through April 2. Pepperdine University, 24255 Pacific Coast Highway, Malibu. (310) 506-4851. arts.pepperdine.edu/museum.

ANNIE KORZEN WITH FRITZ COLEMAN

Annie Korzen returns to the stage with longtime Southern California weathercaster Fritz Coleman. Korzen will do a short set before introducing Coleman. After the performance, Korzen will sit down with Coleman to discuss his background, experiences and passions. The audience is encouraged to ask questions. 5 p.m. $25. American Jewish University, Familian Campus, 15600 Mulholland Drive, Los Angeles. (310) 440-1572. wcce.aju.edu.

“ANI YERUSHALMI”

“Ani Yerushalmi” is an original musical from Israel, featuring Yehoram Gaon, one of Israel’s most prominent and iconic actors and singers. The musical tells the story of Gaon’s childhood in Jerusalem and the events that led to the reunification of the city in 1967. 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $60. Broad Stage, 1310 11th St., Santa Monica. (818) 456-8527. maticenter.com.

TUES | JAN 24

“THINK DIFFERENT” WITH AMIT KLEINBERGER

 

JNET Woodland Hills presents Amit Kleinberger, CEO of Menchie’s Frozen Yogurt, which has become the fastest-growing food franchise in the United States and the largest frozen yogurt franchise in the world. Kleinberger, who served in the Israel Defense Forces, will discuss the keys to his business success. 6 p.m. Free. RSVP at eventbrite.com. Temple Aliyah, 6025 Valley Circle Blvd., Los Angeles. jnetonline.org.

KLEZMER: A LIVE MUSICAL REVIVAL

JDC Entwine presents a klezmer concert and exploration of Jewish identity through music. Learn how young Jews are putting a modern spin on traditional Jewish music. There will be a live performance by Orchestra Euphonos and an exclusive screening of a short film featuring Zhenya Lopatnik, a leading voice in the Yiddish-language music scene. Complimentary drinks. 21-and-older event. 7 p.m. $15. Tickets available at eventbrite.com. The Record Parlour, 6408 Selma Ave., Los Angeles. jdcentwine.org.

THURS | JAN 26

“JEWISH IDENTITY IN QUESTION: THE LEGACY OF IRENE NEMIROVSKY”

Susan Rubin Suleiman, a research professor at Harvard University, will discuss Jewish identity in the life and work of Irene Nemirovsky. Nemirovsky was an accomplished novelist during the 1930s but was deported from France because she was a Russian Jew, and she died in Auschwitz. Many believed Nemirovsky to be anti-Semitic because of her portrayal of Jews in her novels. Nemirovsky’s story reflects many assimilated Jews in Europe who had abandoned Jewish religious practice but were still persecuted by the Nazis. 4 p.m. Free. UCLA Faculty Center, 480 Charles E. Young Drive East, Los Angeles. (310) 267-5327. cjs.ucla.edu.

Calendar: January 20-26


FRI | JAN 20

SHABBAT TRIBUTE TO MLK

Celebrate the life and legacy of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. at Kol Tikvah, with Rabbi Jon Hanish and Cantor Noa Shaashua. Special guests Dr. Dee and the Sacred Praise Chorale, one of Los Angeles’ premier gospel choirs, will also be featured. Everyone is welcome to attend this soulful event. Followed by socializing, sweet treats and coffee. 6:30 p.m. Free. Kol Tikvah, 20400 Ventura Blvd., Woodland Hills. (818)348-0670. koltikvah.org.

SHISHI ISRAELI

Bring family and friends for a Shishi Israeli celebration at the IAC Shepher Community Center, which has undergone a major renovation. There will be a kosher dinner, activities and live music. 6:30 p.m. $21 for adults; $13 for children. IAC Shepher Community Center, 6530 Winnetka Ave., Woodland Hills. israeliamerican.org.

SAT | JAN 21

WOMEN’S MARCH

If you support human rights, tolerance and compassion for humanity, join in this diverse event, which will start at Pershing Square (532 S. Olive St.) and end at City Hall (200 N. Spring St., Los Angeles). 9 a.m. Free. Downtown Los Angeles. (310) 200-0124. womensmarchla.org.

“NOURISHING TRADITION”

Gain insight into how Jewish artists think about food, home and traditions at the new exhibit “Nourishing Tradition.” It will feature paintings and sculptural assemblies by artists including Judy Dekel, Harriete Estel Berman, Betty Green, Harriet Glaser, Benny Ferdman, Marleene Rubenstein, Marilee Tolwin and Penny Wolin. The evening includes a reception and an artist talk. 6:30 p.m. reception; 7 p.m. artist talk. Free. Through March 5. The Braid, 2912 Colorado Ave., No. 102, Santa Monica. (310) 315-1400. jewishwomenstheatre.org.

“THE MATZO BALL DIARIES”

In “The Matzo Ball Diaries,” 15 professional and amateur writers reveal funny and poignant moments about the power of food. A boy decides to give up certain Jewish foods in order to lose weight, but will he lose his religion after he loses weight? Another man begins a food franchise only to realize the impact he has had on Americans. These and other moving stories will be presented at a variety of venues. 8 p.m. $40. The Braid, 2912 Colorado Ave., No. 102, Santa Monica. Additional shows presented at synagogues throughout Los Angeles. (310) 315-1400. jewishwomenstheatre.org.

SUN | JAN 22

“CHAMPIONING CIVIL RIGHTS & RESISTING INJUSTICE”

The late Rabbi Joachim Prinz and composer Kurt Weill were German-Jewish emigres who fled Nazi Germany for the United States. This symposium will put the lives and works of these two men in conversation. Their shared historical foundation for social justice will be explored as well as each individual’s contribution to the world. The event is part of the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra’s “Lift Every Voice” festival. Followed by a concert in Royce Hall. 9:30 a.m. Free. UCLA, 314 Royce Hall, Los Angeles. (310) 267-5327. cjs.ucla.edu.

RUNNING CLUSTER

Join Young Adults of Los Angeles’ Running Cluster for a four-mile run up Sunset Boulevard, past the outskirts of Bel Air and through the heart of Westwood. Meet afterward at Nekter Juice Bar (10912 Lindbrook Drive, Westwood Village) for a juice or bite to eat. 9:30 a.m. Free. UCLA, 10899 Le Conte Ave., Los Angeles. (323) 761-8000. yala.org.

“LARRY BELL: PACIFIC RED”

The Frederick R. Weisman Museum of Art at Pepperdine University presents “Larry Bell: Pacific Red.” There will be a reception to meet Bell, who was a founder of the California Light and Space movement in the 1960s. He has pushed the boundaries of perception and technology in his mission to explore light and vision. “Pacific Red” features a historical survey of his art from the 1950s and ’60s as well as a new installation designed for the galleries at the Weisman Museum of Art. 2 p.m. Free. Through April 2. Pepperdine University, 24255 Pacific Coast Highway, Malibu. (310) 506-4851. arts.pepperdine.edu/museum.

ANNIE KORZEN WITH FRITZ COLEMAN

Annie Korzen returns to the stage with longtime Southern California weathercaster Fritz Coleman. Korzen will do a short set before introducing Coleman. After the performance, Korzen will sit down with Coleman to discuss his background, experiences and passions. The audience is encouraged to ask questions. 5 p.m. $25. American Jewish University, Familian Campus, 15600 Mulholland Drive, Los Angeles. (310) 440-1572. wcce.aju.edu.

“ANI YERUSHALMI”

“Ani Yerushalmi” is an original musical from Israel, featuring Yehoram Gaon, one of Israel’s most prominent and iconic actors and singers. The musical tells the story of Gaon’s childhood in Jerusalem and the events that led to the reunification of the city in 1967. 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $60. Broad Stage, 1310 11th St., Santa Monica. (818) 456-8527. maticenter.com.

TUES | JAN 24

“THINK DIFFERENT” WITH AMIT KLEINBERGER

 

JNET Woodland Hills presents Amit Kleinberger, CEO of Menchie’s Frozen Yogurt, which has become the fastest-growing food franchise in the United States and the largest frozen yogurt franchise in the world. Kleinberger, who served in the Israel Defense Forces, will discuss the keys to his business success. 6 p.m. Free. RSVP at eventbrite.com. Temple Aliyah, 6025 Valley Circle Blvd., Los Angeles. jnetonline.org.

KLEZMER: A LIVE MUSICAL REVIVAL

JDC Entwine presents a klezmer concert and exploration of Jewish identity through music. Learn how young Jews are putting a modern spin on traditional Jewish music. There will be a live performance by Orchestra Euphonos and an exclusive screening of a short film featuring Zhenya Lopatnik, a leading voice in the Yiddish-language music scene. Complimentary drinks. 21-and-older event. 7 p.m. $15. Tickets available at eventbrite.com. The Record Parlour, 6408 Selma Ave., Los Angeles. jdcentwine.org.

THURS | JAN 26

“JEWISH IDENTITY IN QUESTION: THE LEGACY OF IRENE NEMIROVSKY”

Susan Rubin Suleiman, a research professor at Harvard University, will discuss Jewish identity in the life and work of Irene Nemirovsky. Nemirovsky was an accomplished novelist during the 1930s but was deported from France because she was a Russian Jew, and she died in Auschwitz. Many believed Nemirovsky to be anti-Semitic because of her portrayal of Jews in her novels. Nemirovsky’s story reflects many assimilated Jews in Europe who had abandoned Jewish religious practice but were still persecuted by the Nazis. 4 p.m. Free. UCLA Faculty Center, 480 Charles E. Young Drive East, Los Angeles. (310) 267-5327. cjs.ucla.edu.

8 things for Jews to do at Christmastime


SAT | DEC 24

“FIDDLER ON THE ROOF” SING-A-LONG

All fans are invited to screenings of the classic musical film “Fiddler on the Roof.” With audi- ence participation, movie trivia and guest hosts, it’s sure to be a memorable evening. Sing along to “Sunrise, Sunset,” “If I Were a Rich Man,” “To Life,” “Matchmaker, Matchmaker” and more. “Fiddler on the Roof” will screen at six Laemmle venues across Southern Cali- fornia. 7:30 p.m. $15 to $18. For tickets and more information, visit laemmle.com/fiddler.

ELON GOLD & FRIENDS: “MERRY EREV XMAS”

Enjoy an evening of comedy featuring comedian Elon Gold. Show times: 7:30, 9:30 and 11:30 p.m. $35. Laugh Factory, 8001 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. (323) 656-1336. ” target=”_blank”>infinitelight.la

OM SHALOM YOGA: HAVDALLANUKA EDITION

Say goodbye to Shabbat, welcome another day of Chanukah, stretch, sing, listen, have a bite and delight in your inner glow and outer light during Om Shalom and Beth Chayim Cha- dashim’s Havdalah and Chanukah-themed yoga practice. Bring a yoga mat, towel and water, and dress in comfortable exercise clothes. Light vegan finger food will be served. Om Sha- lom Yoga is led by Zack Lodmer and assisted by Jason Gamer and Cantor Juval Porat, and features live music. 6 p.m. $15 (No one will be turned away for lack of funds). Beth Chayim Chadashim, 6090 W. Pico Blvd., Los Angeles. ” target=”_blank”>matzoball.org.

SUN | DEC 25

HOLIDAY MEAL

All are welcome to join Temple Adat Elohim’s annual holiday meal. The event is open to com- munity members throughout the Conjeo Valley, from the homeless to those who are seeking ca- maraderie during the holiday season. This is a volunteer-driven event. 11:30 a.m. Free. Social Hall at Temple Adat Elohim, 2420 E. Hillcrest Drive, Thousand Oaks. (805) 497-7101. ” target=”_blank”>lajfilmfest.org.

Calendar: September 2-8


FRI | SEPT 2

SHISHI ISRAELI FOR YOUNG ADULTS

Join in the new Kaballat Shabbat gathering in Los Angeles for young Jewish and Israeli adults, ages 25-40. Engage in a warm and welcoming Shabbat event with music, food and friends (new and old). There will be a traditional kosher-style dinner served and alcohol for those 21 and older. In collaboration with World Zionist Organization-Department for Diaspora Activities, Israeli-American Council (IAC) and Israeli House LA. 7:30 p.m. $25 general admission. IAC Shepher Community Center, 6530 Winnetka Ave., Woodland Hills. ” target=”_blank”>odysseytheatre.com.

SAT | SEPT 3

“MOONLIGHT AND MAGNOLIAS”

This comedy by Ron Hutchinson tells how one of the most iconic films in Hollywood history almost did not get made. It’s three weeks into filming “Gone With the Wind” — Atlanta has burned, Scarlett O’Hara has been cast — and there is no workable script. Producer David O. Selznick has five days to save the troubled production. Selznick brings in Victor Fleming to take over as director and screenwriter Ben Hecht to rewrite the script — but Hecht has never read the book it’s based on. So Selznick and Fleming hilariously re-enact scenes from the novel for Hecht to adapt into a screenplay that would become the epic, Academy Award-winning film. Directed by Stephanie A. Coltrin. Post-show party on opening night hosted by The Greek Mediterranean Steak & Seafood. 7 p.m. $95. Rubicon Theatre, 1006 E. Main St., Ventura. (805) 667-2900. SUN | SEPT 4

CHABAD TELETHON

The Chabad “To Life” telethon has become a worldwide, joyful celebration of life since it first aired in 1980. It is reminder of the power of good deeds, and donations have ranged from $1 up to thousands. The money goes to an array of Chabad efforts, such as education, summer camps, children with special needs, community outreach and crisis intervention, just to name a few. You will enjoy a star-studded lineup that includes the always-endearing “dancing rabbis.” Those in the Los Angeles area can watch on KSCI-TV (LA 18). 5 p.m. TUES | SEPT 6

CRUCIAL CONVERSATIONS: ELECTION 2016

The Jewish Journal and Sinai Temple Men’s Club present one in a series of Crucial Conversations, this one about the upcoming presidential election. Rabbi David Wolpe will moderate a discussion between Jewish Journal Publisher and Editor-in-Chief Rob Eshman and President David Suissa on topics including the fight against terrorism, U.S. national security and the U.S.-Israel relationship. 6:30 p.m. Free. $10 for dinner; free for Men’s Club and Sinai Temple members. RSVP is mandatory to rsvp@jewishjournal.com or (310) 474-1518, ext. 3340. Sinai Temple, 10400 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 474-1518. THURS | SEPT 8

AN EVENING OF MA’ALEH FILMS AND REFLECTION

The Ma’aleh Film School of Jerusalem returns to Los Angeles to screen award-winning short films by its graduate students, including one created by the Ma’aleh VideoTherapy Bereaved Fathers’ Group. You will also have the opportunity to meet Ofir Shaar, father of Gilad, one of the three boys kidnapped and murdered by Hamas in 2014; Keren Hakak, the filmmaker who guided the bereaved fathers group; and Neta Ariel, director of the Ma’aleh Film School of Jerusalem. Special guests include producer Zvi Howard Rosenman and newly appointed Israeli Consul General in Los Angeles Sam Grundwerg. 7 p.m. $75; $85 at the door. Laemmle Music Hall, 9036 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (323) 937-0980. ” target=”_blank”>nessah.org.

“STORIES FROM THE FRINGE: WOMEN RABBIS, REVEALED!”

This funny and insightful play chronicles the true stories of some of L.A.’s most beloved women rabbis. You will hear stories of determination, prayer, ritual and motherhood as you get a peek into the lives of such rabbis as Sharon Brous, Denise Eger, Laura Geller and Naomi Levy. This is Judaism’s feminist story of triumph as until less than 45 years ago, only men could pursue a career as a rabbi. There will be dessert and a post-show discussion with distinguished women rabbis. 8 p.m. $40. The Braid, 2912 Colorado Ave., No. 102, Santa Monica. (310) 315-1400.

Calendar: March 25-31, 2016


FRI | MARCH 25

KEHILLAT ISRAEL PURIM EXTRAVAGANZA

Come in costume and see circus performers, play games, get your face painted and win prizes. There will also be a carnival for the younger ones in the Early Childhood Center. Dinner included. 5 p.m. carnival; 7 p.m. Shabbat service and megillah reading. $20 all-access wristbands. RSVP requested. Kehillat Israel, 16019 W. Sunset Blvd., Pacific Palisades. (310) 459-2328. ” target=”_blank”>facebook.com/congregationbethohr.

SAT | MARCH 26

BLOWOUT PURIM PARTY

Come get wild for Purim with live music by DJ River, an open bar, tapas and special guests. Don’t forget to wear a costume! 8 p.m. $65. Dance Revolution Studio, 6626 Valjean Ave., Van Nuys. (818) 836-6700. TUE | MARCH 29

WORDS, WIT & WISDOM

Join a variety of celebrated authors and enjoy a delicious lunch. Featured writers include Cheryl Cecchetto (“Passion to Create: Your Invitation to Celebrate”), Hollye Dexter (“Fire Season”), Frances Dinkelspiel (“Tangled Vines: Greed, Murder, Obsession and an Arsonist in the Vineyards of California”) and David Kukoff (“Children of the Canyon”). The event is sponsored by the Brandeis National Committee-San Fernando Valley Chapter and will be moderated by the Jewish Journal’s book editor and Los Angeles Times book reviewer, Jonathan Kirsch. Proceeds go to Brandeis University’s “Sustaining the Mind” initiative, which funds neurodegenerative disease research and science scholarships. 10 a.m. $75. Skirball Cultural Center, 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles. (818) 312-4403. WED | MARCH 30

BEHIND THE LENS: JOEL BERNSTEIN, HENRY DILTZ AND GRAHAM NASH

For one night only, three visionaries of American culture — Henry Diltz, Joel Bernstein and Graham Nash — will come together for a large-screen presentation and multi-decade retrospective. Legendary singer-songwriter Nash is a two-time Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee and internationally renowned photographer. Diltz, the official photographer at Woodstock and a founding partner at Morrison Hotel Gallery, has had his work grace hundreds of album covers. Bernstein’s work chronicles the inner lives and public moments of some of the most important music stars of our time, including Joni Mitchell, Neil Young, Bob Dylan and Bruce Springsteen. Original hand-signed photos will be for sale. Tickets: $50. 6:30 p.m. (doors), 7:30 p.m. (show). Largo at the Cornet, 366 N. La Cienega Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 855-0350. ” target=”_blank”>friendsofroots.net.

FEDCONNECT NETWORKING LUNCH

Meet The Jewish Federation of Greater Los Angeles’ president and CEO, Jay Sanderson, while you eat and learn about the future of Jewish life in Los Angeles at this FedConnect event for local professionals. Noon. Free. Pessah Law Group, 1808 Century Park East, 26th floor, Los Angeles. (323) 761-8291. THUR | MARCH 31

JILL BIALOSKY AND ROB SPILLMAN: DISCUSSION AND BOOK SIGNING

In Jill Bialosky’s “The Prize,” Edward Darby has everything a man could hope for: meaningful work, a loving wife and a beloved daughter. He strives not to let ambition, money, power and his dark past corrode his life, but when a celebrated artist betrays him and another very different artist awakens his heart and stirs up secrets from his past, Darby finds himself unhinged. Rob Spillman, co-founding editor of the legendary Tin House magazine, has devoted his life to the rebellious pursuit of artistic authenticity. After several relocations, Spillman discovered he was chasing the one thing that had always eluded him — a place or person to call home. In his memoir, “All Tomorrow’s Parties,” Spillman narrates a colorful and music-filled coming-of-age story of an artist’s life and a cultural exploration of a changing Berlin. 7 p.m. Free. Book Soup, 8818 Sunset Blvd., West Hollywood. (310) 659-3110. ” target=”_blank”>yala.org.

“STELLA’S LAST J-DATE”

This is the world premiere of Andy Rooster Bloch’s romantic comedy about a high-stakes blind date from the point of view of two lost New York singles. What are they willing to endure to not be lonely? Stella is a chatty and lovable dog trainer with intense baggage; Isaac is an alcoholic school teacher with his own skeletons. Isaac will ultimately have to muster up his inner strength to fight for Stella. Directed by Bryan Rasmussen. 8 p.m. $25. Tickets at jdate.brownpapertickets.com. Ages 18 and older. Whitefire Theatre, 13500 Ventura Blvd., Sherman Oaks. (818) 990-2324.

Calendar: July 24-30


FRI | JULY 24

“THE OUTRAGEOUS SOPHIE TUCKER”

From rags to riches, Sophie Tucker and her big personality paved the way for performers such as Madonna, Bette Midler and Lady Gaga. The opening-night film of this year’s Los Angeles Jewish Film Festival is now in theaters around Los Angeles. It was written and produced by Susan and Lloyd Ecker, who went through more than 400 of Tucker’s personal scrapbooks and met with many of her friends and family members to get the full story that you will see on the screen. Directed by Academy Award-nominated documentary filmmaker William Gazecki. Times vary. Playhouse 7, 673 E. Colorado Blvd., Pasadena; Town Center 5, 17200 Ventura Blvd., Encino. laemmle.com.

SUN | JULY 26

LIL REV & FRED SOKOLOW

Two funny Jewish guys … what a great way to end the weekend and get ready for the week ahead. Fred Sokolow, best known for his 150 instructional books and DVDs for guitar, banjo, ukulele, mandolin and many more, is a multistring performer and recording artist with a passion that shines through, whether he’s playing the blues, a ragtime piece or a screaming rock-guitar solo. Lil Rev, often called the Jewish Pete Seeger, will bring his high energy to this heartfelt concert as he seamlessly moves among song, story, poetry and humor. 7 p.m. $20. The Coffee Gallery Backstage, 2029 N. Lake Ave., Altadena. (626) 798-6236. coffeegallery.com.

“BAD JEWS”

The New York Times calls it “the best comedy of the season” — and tonight is the last night to see it in Los Angeles. Joshua Harmon’s off-Broadway play explores the question: Is there such thing as a “bad Jew”? Daphna swears she is the most devout Jew of her family. But after the death of her grandfather, her less-observant cousin Liam comes to town, and the two argue about who is the rightful heir to their grandfather’s chai necklace, which he kept safe during his time in a concentration camp by hiding it under his tongue. Despite their differing sense of Judaism, they learn to navigate through their kvetching with chutzpah and humor. Directed by Matt Shakman and starring Ari Brand, Molly Ephraim, Lili Fuller and Raviv Ullman. 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. $37-$72. Geffen Playhouse, 10886 Le Conte Ave., Los Angeles. (310) 208-5454. geffenplayhouse.com.

TUES | JULY 28 

“BENT”

This is the first major U.S. revival of Martin Sherman’s “Bent” since its Broadway premiere in 1979. From director Moises Kaufman (“The Laramie Project”) comes this groundbreaking drama about the power of love under some of history’s most inhumane conditions. “Bent” chronicles the struggles of two gay men in Nazi Germany who are fighting not just for their right to love, but also for their right to live. The beautiful and moving story is brought to life on stage and shows the unbreakable force of the human spirit. 8 p.m. Through Aug. 23. $55-$75. Mark Taper Forum, 135 N. Grand Ave., Los Angeles. (213) 628-2772. centertheatregroup.org.

THUR | JULY 30

LOVE FEST: LOVE ANGELES

Greet the end of summer with a bang — or a hike, or a bonfire, or a tour through Hollywood Forever Cemetery. The annual citywide celebration of love and Tu b’Av is back with a new twist: Instead of one big party, East Side Jews is collaborating with organizations all over the city for three days of fun events. The fest kicks off Thursday night on the Eastside with “Love After Dark: Griffith Park Sunset Hike.” Hike through the canyons of Griffith Park up to the observatory and see why this spot is considered one of L.A.’s most famous lookouts. Snacks will be provided, but feel free to bring your own. Don’t forget to pack a picnic blanket! Over on the Westside, join Moishe House Venice and NuRoots for “Ignite Your Fire: A Midsummer’s Night Beach Bonfire” with camp games, s’mores and drinks. Other offerings of Love Fest include a Shabbat potluck dinner at the revamped Echo Park Lake and a garden cocktail party under a full moon. Hike: 7:15 p.m. Free. 4730 Crystal Springs Drive, Los Angeles. Bonfire: 7 p.m. Free. Dockweiler Beach, near lifeguard tower 53. RSVP requested. (323) 663-2255.

Calendar: April 3–10


FRI | APRIL 3

“PASSAGES”

Chronicling the history of the Bible, from its transmission and translation to its impact and controversies, the traveling exhibition “Passages” features about 400 artifacts set against immersive environments like the caves of Qumran and the Jerusalem Chamber at Westminster Abbey. Covering a religious spectrum from Jewish to Protestant, the show’s diversity means it aims for a diverse audience. Hours vary. Through Feb. 27, 2016. $12 (general), $10 (children and seniors). 26565 Bouquet Canyon Road, Santa Clarita. (888) 297-8011. SAT | APRIL 4

“2ND NIGHT: NOT YOUR ZAYDE’S SEDER!”

Trying to figure out how to compete with night one of a family-filled seder? Grab your zayde and get it right the second night with Temple Judea’s celebration filled with food, music, four famous questions and the “prince of kosher gospel,” Joshua Nelson. Nelson, a Black Jew, infuses his music with both parts of his identity. He’s sung with Aretha Franklin and The Klezmatics, and was hailed the “next big thing” by Oprah Winfrey. 5 p.m. $35-$70. Temple Judea, 5429 Lindley Ave., Tarzana. (818) 758-3800. ” target=”_blank”>thejar.com.

TUE | APRIL 7

CAROL ES

This L.A.-based multimedia artist went on a day trip near Joshua Tree National Park in the spring of 2014. Thanks to her new solo exhibition, “Exodus,” that trip is now an experience for us as well. Using mixed-media collages and a series of paintings, Es — who took photographs and video footage, kept a journal and practiced meditation — reveals her journey through the wilderness and the self-reflection it inspired. 10 a.m. Through May 9. Free. Shulamit Gallery, 17 N. Venice Blvd., Venice. (310) 281-0961. THUR | APRIL 9

MOBY AND GENE BAUR

Author of “Living the Farm Sanctuary Life” Gene Baur and musician and animal-rights activist Moby sit down with Time magazine’s Joel Stein to discuss an eco- and animal-friendly lifestyle. With a focus on connecting with nature wherever you are and making the world a better place, the program will inform and inspire, whether you change your eating habits or don’t. There will be a book signing after the conversation. 8 p.m. Free. Skirball Cultural Center, 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 440-4500. ” target=”_blank”>hammer.ucla.edu.

THUR | APRIL 10

“WHILE WE’RE YOUNG”

Married couple Josh and Cornelia are living a childless, New York, middle-aged life. As their other friends settle into their lives as parents, the couple gravitates toward a young hipster couple, Jamie and Darby. Directed by Noah Baumbach (“Frances Ha”) and starring Ben Stiller, Naomi Watts, Adam Driver and Amanda Seyfried, the film is an honest and fun look at adolescence at any age, and the journeys that some people decide to take together, for better or worse. Hip-hop dance scenes and social paranoia included. Various times. At theaters citywide. 

Calendar: January 4–10


SAT | JAN 4

ILIZA SHLESINGER

She’s the first female and youngest comedian to win NBC’s “Last Comic Standing.” She’s had a half-hour special on “Comedy Central Presents,” she’s worked with “Pauly Shore & Friends” on Showtime, Chelsea Handler on E!, Joel McHale on “The Soup” and NBC’s “Last Call with Carson Daly.” Whether she’s discussing our responsibility to polar bears or what missing teeth can reveal, she discusses it with biting expertise. 18 and older. Sat. 8 p.m. $15 (two-item minimum). Hollywood Improv, 8162 Melrose Ave., Hollywood. (323) 651-2583. ” target=”_blank”>geffenplayhouse.com


WED | JAN 8

DARA FRIEDMAN 

In Dara Friedman’s “PLAY, Parts 1 & 2,” 17 couples — some fictionally paired and some in real-life relationships with one another — develop and play out improvised scenes of intimacy. Filmed during Friedman’s residency with the Hammer, “PLAY” features the actors in poetic, intense and humorous situations that grow from improvisational games. Friedman will participate in a Q-and-A following the screening. Wed. 7:30 p.m. Free. Billy Wilder Theater at the Hammer Museum, 10899 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 443-7000. THU | JAN 9

“THE ROLE OF THE FORGOTTEN MOURNER”

Rabbi Daniel Greyber returns to Southern California to discuss his most recent book, “Faith Unravels: A Rabbi’s Struggle With Grief and God.” What are the rules for dealing with the loss of a friend, mentor or colleague? Greyber, the former executive director of Camp Ramah in California, speaks to the pain experienced by the forgotten mourners by sharing personal stories of faith lost and regained anew. Kosher lunch served. RSVP required to park in building. Thu. Noon. $18 (nonmembers), $10 (Sinai Temple, Camp Ramah members). Sinai Temple, 10400 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 481-3243. ” target=”_blank”>skirball.org


FRI | JAN 10

N’SHAMA WOMEN’S RETREAT

What better way to start off the New Year than with a renewal of the soul in nature’s beauty? Valley Beth Shalom and Temple Aliyah host a women’s weekend to celebrate Shabbat Shira. Join Rabbi Nina Bieber Feinstein and Cindy Paley Aboody at the Brandeis-Bardin Institute for two days of spiritual prayer, song and learning, dancing, drumming, hikes, a margarita bar and more. You are woman — make some time to roar (and relax). Through Jan. 11. Fri. $225 (double occupancy). Brandeis-Bardin Campus, 1101 Peppertree Lane, Simi Valley. (818) 222-0192. ” target=”_blank”>templealiyah.org

SHABBAT SHIRA — THE SHABBAT OF SONG

Temple Emanuel celebrates 75 years of music and prayer with the help of Los Angeles’ premier Jewish choir, the Los Angeles Zimriyah Chorale, conducted by Nick Strimple. Fri. 6:30 p.m. Free (service only), $18 (dinner, adult), $12 (dinner, child). Temple Emanuel of Beverly Hills, 300 N. Clark Drive, Beverly Hills. (310) 843-9588. ” target=”_blank”>templejudea.com.

Moving and Shaking: Janos Ader visits Congregation Bais Naftolil; Tour de Summer Camps


Traveling through Hancock Park in a motorcade on Oct. 27, Janos Ader, president of the Republic of Hungary, visited Congregation Bais Naftoli, where he participated in a breakfast held in his honor. Rabbi Avi Leibovic, spiritual leader of Bais Naftoli and executive director of Aish Tamid, introduced the program. 

The event underscored the progress that has been made in relations between Jews and the non-Jewish Hungarian community in the decades since the Holocaust, when Hungary was allied with Nazi Germany and played a role in the persecution of the Jewish people. Ader’s local appearance followed recent remarks by Tibor Navracsics, Hungary’s deputy prime minister, recognizing the country’s role in the Holocaust. The Los Angeles event also acknowledged the Hungarian government’s increasingly hardened stance against anti-Semitism.

Bais Naftoli President Andrew Friedman organized the meeting, which featured Leibovic reciting a special blessing required when greeting the president of a country who has the constitutional power to pardon individuals. Afterward, Friedman recited a traditional prayer in Hungarian.

Hungarian first lady Anita Herczegh accompanied Ader, along with a 14-member, high-level delegation. Additional attendees included Laszlo Kalman, consul general of Hungary in Los Angeles; Miklos Perehazy, president of United Magyar House, an L.A.-based Hungarian community center; and Hungarian Ambassador to the United States Szapary Gyorgy.

Near the end of the event, Ader presented a booklet to the congregation in memory of the synagogue’s founder, Alex Friedman


Cycling team the Ramah Roadies beat out the Sinai Family Minyan Spinners on Oct. 27, during The Jewish Federation of Greater Los Angeles’ inaugural fundraising cycling event, Tour de Summer Camps, which raised money for scholarships for Jewish camps.

A total of 475 riders signed up for various distances, with some participating as individuals and others on teams. Together they raised approximately $600,000 through donations and sponsorships to benefit Camps Akiba, Alonim, Gilboa, Hess Kramer, JCA Shalom and Ramah; Gindling Hilltop Camp; Kibbutz Max Straus; and Moshava Malibu. 

The Sunday event underscored Federation’s longstanding commitment to the Jewish camps movement, which is widely believed to foster a sense of Jewish identity and planting the seeds for future Jewish leaders. Routes were 18 miles, 36 miles, 62 miles and 100 miles, and at the end of the afternoon, many riders came together at Brandeis-Bardin, the Simi Valley campus of American Jewish University.

“It was an incredible day, beyond all my expectations, especially since it was our inaugural event. I’m so proud of all the participants,” said Rodney Freeman, Tour de Summer Camps ride master, as quoted by The Federation. 

Top fundraisers included Freeman, Aaron Leibovic, Mark Samuel, Jay Reisbaum and Ari Eisenberg. The top teams were the Ramah Roadies, Team REC/YLDI, Sinai Family Minyan Spinners, Team Shomrei Torah and Temple Beth Am Cycles.

Moving and Shaking acknowledges accomplishments by members of the local Jewish community, including people who start new jobs, leave jobs, win awards and more, as well as local events that featured leaders from the Jewish and Israeli communities. Got a tip? E-mail it to ryant@jewishjournal.com.

Moving and Shaking: Milken Jewish Educator Awards and USCJ conference


Osnat Bernstein of Abraham Joshua Heschel Day School was one of four recipients of this year's Jewish Educator Award. Courtesy of the Milken Family Foundation.

Four educators at area Jewish schools were awarded $15,000 Milken Jewish Educator Awards by the Milken Family Foundation earlier this month.

The annual prizes this year went to Deborah Raskin, principal at Or HaChaim Academy, an Orthodox elementary and middle school in North Hollywood; Mickey Rabinov, a Hebrew and Judaic studies teacher and administrator at Beth Hillel Day School in Valley Village; Osnat Bernstein, a middle school Hebrew teacher at Abraham Joshua Heschel Day School in Northridge; and Benny Ferdman, founding artistic director and visual arts teacher at New Community Jewish High School in West Hills.

The prize, which comes with the hefty, unrestricted cash award for each recipient, recognizes outstanding teachers, administrators and other education professionals in the Greater Los Angeles area who work at day schools affiliated with BJE–Builders of Jewish Education. The award was established in 1990.

BJE executive director Gil Graff, along with Richard Sandler, executive vice president of the Milken Family Foundation, which promotes education and medical research, surprised the four local educators during school assemblies at each campus on Oct. 15.

“The Jewish Educator Awards call upon others in the profession to emulate the high standards of those we honor today — educators whose intelligence, scholarship, creativity and compassion help guide children to greater success, while preserving the heritage that gives meaning to that success,” Sandler wrote in a statement.

The award recognizes day school educators from across the Jewish spectrum in elementary and secondary education, while increasing public support for them and raising awareness of their contributions to the community and society. The cash award also encourages able, caring and creative people to choose a career in education, according to the foundation’s Web site. 

The foundation works in cooperation with BJE, the central agency for Jewish education in Los Angeles, in identifying winners.


Attendees of the United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism (USCJ) centennial this month included Orange County resident Missy Jane (third from left), Academy Jewish Religion, California cantorial student Amy Robinson (fifth from left) and Temple Aliyah’s Cantor Mike Stein (eighth from left).  Photo courtesy of USCJ.

When the United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism’s (USCJ) centennial conference took place in Baltimore, Md., Oct. 13-15 with the theme, “Conversation of the Century,” the event drew some of the movement’s most prominent West Coast leaders.

The Los Angeles contingent included a number of rabbis from American Jewish University: Rabbi Bradley Shavit Artson, dean of the Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies; Rabbi Elliot Dorff, rector and professor of philosophy; Ron Wolfson, a professor at the Graduate Center for Education, and others. Rabbi Ed Feinstein of Valley Beth Shalom in Encino and Hazzan Mike Stein of Temple Aliyah in Woodland Hills were also among the attendees.

As the keynote speaker on Oct. 13, Artson reflected on these changing times: “All wisdom traditions struggle in an age in which the shifts in culture are so massive that they will not be met by merely a few institutional adjustments, as valuable as those may be. Nor will they revive because of a changed name or the slick slogan, although those might also be helpful. No, our challenge is to step beyond habit, to reach beyond fear, to return to a core vision that is worthy of our passion and our talents and our lives.”

Feinstein commented on the recent study by the Pew Research Center, “A Portrait of Jewish Americans,” which suggests Jewish affiliation is on the decline and that the Conservative movement, in particular, faces a difficult road ahead, during an Oct. 14 morning session. 

“Our house is on fire. If you don’t read anything else in the Pew report, [it is that] we have maybe 10 years left,” Feinstein is quoted as saying in media reports. “In the next 10 years you will see a rapid collapse of synagogues and the national organizations that support them.”

According to the USCJ Web site, the conference — which was preceded by a two-day Shabbaton — highlighted “the future, the challenges and opportunities we face in re-imaging our kehillot – our sacred communities – for a changing Jewish world and over 1.5 million members.”

It brought together more than 100 speakers and artists and featured lectures, discussions, study and breakout sessions, workshops and musical performances. More than 1,200 lay leaders, professionals, leaders, congregants, students and clergy attended.

Founded in 1913, USCJ is the umbrella organization for Conservative congregations in North America. Last week’s event marked the USCJ 100th anniversary and served as the association’s biennial. 


Moving and Shaking acknowledges accomplishments by members of the local Jewish community, including people who start new jobs, leave jobs, win awards and more, as well as local events that featured leaders from the Jewish and Israeli communities. Got a tip? E-mail it to ryant@jewishjournal.com.

Moving and Shaking: Shawn Landres receives NextGen Award, ADL honors philanthropists


NextGen Award recipient Shawn Landres. Photo via Google+

Jewish-innovation advocate Shawn Landres praised the Liberty Hill Foundation when the social change organization named him the recipient of its 2013 NextGen Award during its recent Change L.A. ceremony, but he could have just as easily been speaking about the diversity of the city he calls home. 

“Liberty Hill celebrates all of us for who we are and the communities we come from: religious, spiritual or secular, immigrant or homegrown, LGBTQI or not; African-American, Asian-American, Latino, European or all of the above; Boyle Heights, West Hollywood, Santa Monica, Lynwood, Calabasas and beyond,” the co-founder and CEO of Jewish think tank Jumpstart said, accepting his award on Sept. 8.

Given out annually, the NextGen award recognizes individuals who contribute toward the advancement of social justice.

Kafi Blumenfield, president and CEO of the Liberty Hill Foundation, presented Landres with the honor. Incoming Liberty Hill CEO Shane Goldsmith accompanied her onstage during the event, which took place at mid-Wilshire bar Busby’s East. L.A. City Controller Ron Galperin gave Landers a certification of recognition on behalf of the city as well.

Community members in attendance included Jumpstart co-founder Joshua Avedon and board members Richard Siegel, Rhoda Weisman and Adam Weiss; Rabbi Sarah Bassin of NewGround; L.A. City Councilman Bob Blumenfield and others. 

Sponsors included the Jewish Community Foundation of Los Angeles, Bill Resnick, Paula and Barry Litt, the Jumpstart board of directors, IKAR; Julie Hermelin and Sinai Temple. Several Jewish organizations and leaders served on the ceremony’s host committee.


From left: Anti-Defamation League honorees Leonard Comden and Steve Wasserman.

Mitch Dunitz, Leonard Comden and Steve Wasserman were honored for their philanthropic support of the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) on Sept. 11 at the 30th annual ADL/El Caballero Golf Tournament, a collaboration between the ADL and El Caballero Country Club in Tarzana. The event helped raise more than $250,000 for the ADL, according to the organization’s Web site.

Dunitz offered inspiration for other potential philanthropists when he said, “There is no shame in making the calls; there is only shame in not answering the calls when you’re in a position to help.”

Dunitz of Sherman Oaks, who received the Sam Saltsman Award, named after the late Jewish community leader and founder of the annual tournament, is a former president of the Tarzana country club and founder of the real estate investment firm MD Investments. The Distinguished Community Service Award went to Comden of Tarzana and Wasserman of Woodland Hills, who run the law firm Wasserman, Comden, Casselman and Esensten, LLP.

The honors were well deserved, according to an ADL statement that read: “ADL is pleased to celebrate these three honorees for their work in the community and their commitments to philanthropy.” The civil rights agency’s mission is combating anti-Semitism, hate and bigotry.

The event featured 18 holes of golf, dinner, an awards presentation and a live auction.

Alison Diamond and Ron Salter served as event co-chairs.


Moshe Willner addresses the IEEE Photonics Conference. Courtesy of Yeshiva University Los Angeles.

Spending the summer cooped up in a science lab paid off for YULA Boys High School student Moshe Willner. This month, the high school senior was invited to appear at the IEEE Photonics Conference, an annual symposium that draws leading scientists and engineers in light and optics, held in Bellevue, Wash., after a paper he worked on was accepted by the conference.

During his 10-minute presentation, Willner discussed how light sends information. His talk drew from experiments he helped conduct while working at a lab at University of Southern California (USC) this past summer. 

“I loved the idea of discovering something new, something that doesn’t exist, that you can’t find in a textbook already,” Willner said in a statement. “Working in the lab doing research on optical engineering provided me with that exciting feeling of discovery.”

Willner knew little about photonics before spending the summer at USC, where his father, Alan Willner, works as a professor in the department of electrical engineering. 

Willner discovered that he’d been accepted into the conference — which took place from Sept. 8-12 — while building a sukkah with his classmates in preparation for this month’s holiday. It gave him only one day’s notice to make his way to Seattle.

At YULA, a Modern Orthodox high school, Willner is a member of his school’s varsity basketball team. YULA Head of School Rabbi Dov Emerson described him as a “hard-working student” and a “well-respected student leader.”

“Moshe truly represents the best of YULA,” Emerson said.


Moving and Shaking acknowledges accomplishments by members of the local Jewish community, including people who start new jobs, leave jobs, win awards and more, as well as local events that featured leaders from the Jewish and Israeli communities. Got a tip? E-mail it to ryant@jewishjournal.com.

Calendar: September 28–October 4


SAT | SEP 28

“THE GUARDSMAN”

If you thought your beautiful new spouse was cheating on you, wouldn’t you create a disguise and test her fidelity? Ferenc Molnar’s comic game of love and marriage may or may not remind you of you and yours, but with wit and deception aplenty, it’ll certainly be fun to watch. Directed by Michael Michetti. Sat. 8 p.m. Through Nov. 30. $34-$54. A Noise Within, 3352 E. Foothill Blvd., Pasadena. (626) 356-3100. SUN | SEP 29

PEDAL FOR PEACE

StandWithUs wants you to ride with them! The international nonprofit is cycling 60 miles from West Los Angeles to Oxnard in support of Israel. If that sounds a little far, participants can opt for a shorter ride and three-mile walk in Oxnard. And don’t worry, if you can’t find your sneakers, you can still sponsor someone! The journey will conclude with a kosher lunch at the Emerson beach house along with free T-shirts. Suggested donations for walkers and riders. Sun. 6:30 a.m. Meeting location to be announced. (310) 836-6140. ” target=”_blank”>westhollywoodbookfair.org.

WILSHIRE BOULEVARD TEMPLE DEDICATION

It’s a coming-out (again) party! Renewed and ready for action, come celebrate the community-wide (and interfaith) dedication of the newly transformed Wilshire Boulevard Temple. The choral concert will include 150 voices from the Cantorial Choir of the Academy for Jewish Religion and a special closing performance by Burt Bacharach. Sun. 5 p.m. Free. RSVP required. Wilshire Boulevard Temple, Erika J. Glazer Family Campus, 3663 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (424) 208-8932. MON | SEP 30

“PHOTO OPPORTUNITY”

It’s a presidential election year. A candidate makes a campaign stop and meets an elderly Jewish woman — what they learn about each other is a secret that haunts her and threatens him. Joshua Metzger’s play, directed by Elizabeth Sampson, will be read featuring actors Judith Scarpone, Amy Tolsky, Chet Grissom and Laurie Okin. The playwright, a prior winner of the National Playwrights Conference, will be in discussion after the performance. Tue. 8 p.m. Free. NoHo Senior Arts Colony, 10747 Magnolia Blvd., North Hollywood. (818) 761-8838. TUE | OCT 1

“ETGAR KERET: IS REALITY OVERRATED?”

 

The Israeli author, filmmaker, professor, thinker, mover and shaker is in conversation with Literary Death Match host Adrian Todd Zuniga. Internationally acclaimed for his short stories, which have been published in more than 20 languages, Keret will read from his newest collection, “Suddenly, a Knock on the Door.” A signing and a reception follow the discussion, which is sure to be a reality check. Tue. 5:30-7:30 p.m. Free. RSVP required. UCLA Fowler Museum, Lenart Auditorium, Room A103B, Los Angeles. (310) 825-9646. THU | OCT 3

YOSSI KLEIN HALEVI

The globally revered journalist discusses his new book “Like Dreamers: The Story of the Israeli Paratroopers Who Reunited Jerusalem and Divided a Nation.” Chronicling the 40-year story of the soldiers who reunited Jerusalem and divided a nation, it’s one of the year’s more controversial stories. Sponsored by the Younes & Soraya Nazarian Center for Israel Studies and UCLA Hillel. Thu. 3-4:15 p.m. Free. Please register. UCLA School of Law, Room 1314, Los Angeles. (310) 825-9646. ” target=”_blank”>lajfilmfest.org.

DUDAMEL & BRONFMAN 

As part of its 10th anniversary celebration, the Walt Disney Concert Hall is honoring composer Peter Lieberson. Having premiered Lieberson’s “Neruda Songs” in 2005, it is only fitting that the L.A. Phil premieres the late composer’s last piece: “Shing Kham.” Under conductor Gustavo Dudamel, the orchestra, international pianist Yefim Bronfman and percussionist Pedro Carneiro collaborate for a memorable and moving night of melody that includes Schubert’s Symphony No. 4 and Tchaikovsky’s Piano Concerto No. 1. Through Oct. 6. Thu. 8 p.m. $77.50-$180. Walt Disney Concert Hall, 111 S. Grand Ave., downtown. (323) 850-2000.

Calendar September 21–27


SAT | SEP 21

“OY!”

Written with honesty, curiosity and humor by Hélène Cixous, “Oy” follows sisters Selma and Jenny as they return home to Paris after a trip to their German hometown to testify about the horrors they endured during the Holocaust. Based on the experiences of the playwright’s family members, the piece works to untangle the memories and emotions of a shared journey. Sat. 8 p.m. Through Oct. 20. $34.99 (general), $30 (students, seniors). The Actors’ Gang, 9070 Venice Blvd., Culver City. (310) 838-4264. SUN | SEP 22

“CROSSING MUSICAL BORDERS”

Forget melting pot — Los Angeles is a music pot. Presented in association with the “Jews in the Los Angeles Mosaic” exhibition, the Autry celebrates the mishmash that is the L.A. music scene. Christopher “Thes One” Portugal, a record producer and one half of the hip-hop group People Under the Stairs, leads a conversation about these cultural crossovers. Joined by Paul De Castro, California State University, Los Angeles, music professor; Japanese mariachi singer Junko Seki; and Otto Granillo, founder of the band KoTolan, it will truly be a musical mosaic. Sun. 2-4 p.m. $10 (general), $6 (students and seniors), $4 (ages 3-12), free (ages 3 and under, Autry members). The Autry National Center, 4700 Western Heritage Way, Los Angeles. (323) 667-2000. ” target=”_blank”>israeliamerican.org.


TUE | SEP 24

“THE SECOND HARVEST 2.0”

Innovate, strategize, make a difference. YALA, American Jewish World Service, Netiya and MAZON want to address hunger locally and globally. While Sukkot helps us celebrate the bounty we have, take an evening to consider those who have not. MAZON President and CEO Abby Leibman moderates a panel that guarantees some expert difference making with Paula Daniels, former chair of the Los Angeles Food Policy Council; Robert Egger, founder of the L.A. Kitchen; Rabbi Noah Farkas, founder of Netiya; and UCLA law professor Jonathan Zasloff. Kosher refreshments will be served. Must RSVP. Tue. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Jewish Federation of Greater Los Angeles, 6505 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (323) 761-8132. ” target=”_blank”>skirball.org.

“THE SUNSHINE BOYS”

The boys are back in town! Danny DeVito and Judd Hirsch star in the Neil Simon classic. The play tells the story of two aging vaudeville stars who reunite for a TV special years after a bad breakup. Directed by Thea Sharrock and co-starring Justin Bartha, it’s a funny production with a whole lotta heart. Tue. 8 p.m. Through Nov. 3. $40-$90. Ahmanson Theatre, 135 N. Grand Ave., downtown. (213) 628-2772. WED | SEP 25

A SPECIAL MORNING WITH RABBI NAOMI LEVY

Start your day in a strong way, ladies. The Nashuva founder and spiritual leader speaks on “A New Day, A New Way” during a morning of discussion, growth and transformation. Learn about yourself as women, professionals, mothers, wives, daughters and friends. With breakfast under the American Jewish University sukkah, it will be a very special, very spiritual morning indeed. Wed. 10 a.m. $25 (nonmembers), free (University Women members). American Jewish University, Familian Campus, 15600 Muholland Drive, Bel Air. (310) 440-1283. THU | SEP 26

BILLY CRYSTAL

Nothing is clearer than when it’s Billy Crystal clear. With the wit and heart we all love to love, Crystal’s new book, “Still Foolin’ ’Em: Where I’ve Been, Where I’m Going, and Where the Hell Are My Keys?” deftly monitors the absurdities and obstacles that come with aging. Whether you enjoy him as an Oscar host, as the voice of a certain animated monster or as Harry — he’s probably one of the closest friends you’ll have in a stranger. Thu. 7 p.m. Free. Barnes & Noble at The Grove, 189 The Grove Drive, Los Angeles. (323) 525-0270.

Calendar: September 14–20


MON | SEP 16

“THE JEWISH IMMIGRANT IN WORLD CINEMA”

It’s no secret: as a people, we wander. Lawrence Baron discusses the various migrations of Jews in world history and how global cinema has portrayed these movements. Author of “The Wandering View: Modern Jewish Experiences in World Cinema and Projecting the Holocaust Into the Present,” Baron knows a thing or two about Jews and movies. Film clips will be shown. Mon. 11 a.m. Free. Reserved seating. California State University, Northridge, 18111 Nordhoff St., Sierra Hall 268, Northridge. (818) 667-4724. ” target=”_blank”>vromansbookstore.com.


WED | SEP 18

SHARON OSBOURNE

Ahoy, me hearties! Join the “X Factor” judge and talk-show host on Erev Talk Like a Pirate Day as she signs her merry yarn for your wee pirates-in-training, “Mama Hook Knows Best: A Pirate Parent’s Favorite Fables.” Mama Hook, voiced by Osbourne on Disney Junior’s “Jake and the Never Land Pirates,” takes a swim down memory lane, recalling her adventures on the Never Sea and all the tales she shared with a young James Hook. Yaar! It’s gonna get piratey and playful! Wed. 7 pm. Free. Barnes & Noble at the Grove, 189 The Grove Drive, Los Angeles. (323) 525-0270. ” target=”_blank”>laprintmaking.com.


THU | SEP 19

AIMEE BENDER 

The best-selling author who brought you “The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake,” Bender reads from her new short-story collection, “The Color Master.” Whether it’s a tale of two sisters in Malaysia mending tigers or a woman marrying an ogre, Bender beautifully masters the layers and complexities of being ourselves. Thu. 7:30 p.m. Free. Skylight Books, 1818 N. Vermont Ave., Los Angeles. (323) 660-1175. FRI | SEP 20

“A SINGLE SHOT”

When hunter John Moon pulls the trigger on a lone deer, it singularly alters his life. Director David M. Rosenthal (“Janie Jones”) presents a backwoods thriller starring Sam Rockwell, William H. Macy and Jeffrey Wright. Screened at the 2013 Tribeca Film Festival, “A Single Shot” is the chilling tale of a man trying to survive a cat-and-mouse struggle. Fri. Various times. Laemmle NoHo 7, 5240 Lankershim Blvd., North Hollywood. (310) 478-3836. ” target=”_blank”>laemmle.com.

AMY SCHUMER

The brazen beauty takes the mic and will undoubtedly have a lot to say. Star of the hit Comedy Central series “Inside Amy Schumer,” the comedian is making her mark in the ever-growing world of independent funny females. With experience on Broadway, in films and writing for magazines, it’s becoming hard to miss her — so, don’t. Fri. 7 p.m. $51. The Wiltern, 3790 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (213) 388-1400. ” target=”_blank”>hollywood.improv.com.

Moving and Shaking: Temple Adat Elohim names interim rabbi, Brooke Burke-Charvet honored


Rabbi Barry Diamond

Temple Adat Elohim (TAE) has named Southern California native Rabbi Barry Diamond as its interim rabbi. He replaces Rabbi Ted Riter, who ended his 16-year tenure at TAE in May.

Diamond, who grew up in Huntington Beach and Newport Beach, has served in several posts since his ordination at Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion, including time as interim rabbi in Houston, Texas, at Temple Sinai. He has worked as a part-time rabbi at Congregation Beth Shalom of Bryan/College Station, Texas, and spent 14 years leading the education programs at Temple Emanu-El in Dallas.

TAE, a Reform congregation in Thousand Oaks, announced Diamond’s appointment on July 5. A congregational meeting to approve Diamond was held on July 14. 


From left: Actress and model Brooke Burke-Charvet with Barbara Lazaroff, California Spirit co-founder and restaurant designer. Photo courtesy of Amy Williams

Last month, American actress and model Brooke Burke-Charvet was honored at the 29th California Spirit, an annual gala that raises funds for the American Cancer Society.

During the July 28 event, which was held at the Pacific Design Center in West Hollywood, Burke received the Inspiration Award. In 2012, the multifaceted performer who co-hosts “Dancing With the Stars” shocked fans when she announced that she had been diagnosed with thyroid cancer. That same year, Burke’s cancer was successfully removed. 

Co-founded by film executive Sherry Lansing, restaurant designer Barbara Lazaroff and chef Wolfgang Puck, California Spirit features cuisine, wines, live entertainment and a live silent auction. Since 1984, it has raised millions of dollars in support of research, patient services, early detection and more at the American Cancer Society.

Former “Project Runway” contestant Nick Verreos presented the award to Burke. Additional honorees included John Shaffner, Joe Stewart, Dr. Philomena McAndrew and Dr. Solomon Hamburg.


Delegates of AJWS’ rabbinic trip to India included Rabbi Peter Levi (top row, standing), Rabbi Ron Li-Paz (top row, second from left) and Rabbi Sue Levi Elwell (top row, second from right). Photo by Ruth Messinger of AJWS.

Rabbis Ron Li-Paz, of Valley Outreach Synagogue, and Peter Levi, of Temple Beth El in Orange County, traveled to Lucknow, India, last month on a rabbinic delegation trip. 

American Jewish World Service (AJWS), an international humanitarian nonprofit led by activist Ruth Messinger, organized the trip, which provided the local clergy with the opportunity to join national Jewish leaders and volunteers in reflecting on connections between traditional Jewish teaching, service activities and human rights. It was AJWS’ fourth rabbinic delegation to visit somewhere aboard.

In total, 17 rabbis from across the country — including Rabbi Sue Levi Elwell, the Philadelphia-based founding director of the Los Angeles Jewish Feminist Center — participated in the 10-day excursion. It ended July 31.

“We are deeply gratified to have leaders of Rabbis Elwell, Levi and Li-Paz’s caliber as part of our rabbinic delegation to India,” said Messinger, president of AJWS, in a statement released prior to the trip. “Rabbi Elwell, Rabbi Levi and Rabbi Li-Paz, like the other rabbis traveling with us, are tremendous leaders not only in their synagogues and organizations, but also in their local communities.”

AJWS reports that it has sent more than 400 rabbis, rabbinic students and graduate students in Jewish communal programs on learning and service trips in the developing world since 2004. Upon returning home from these trips, delegates work with fellow alumni to form like-minded communities of Jews interested in global justice.  


Moving and Shaking acknowledges accomplishments by members of the local Jewish community, including people who start new jobs, leave jobs, win awards and more, as well as local events that featured leaders from the Jewish and Israeli communities. Got a tip? E-mail it to ryant@jewishjournal.com.

Calendar: Itzhak Perlman, Honey Bee Day, Avi Buffalo, ‘The Diary’ and more


SAT | AUG 17

NATIONAL HONEY BEE DAY

With Rosh Hashanah just around the corner, let us pay tribute to the busy bees that have long contributed to our delicious New Year’s tradition. HoneyLove, an urban beekeeper group, celebrates honeybees with the 2013 theme “Beekeeping — Ask Me How to Get Started.” Who knows, maybe you’ll be making your own honey in 5774. Waggle Dance flash mob at 2 p.m. (practice video online). Sat. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. LUSH, 1404 Third Street Promenade, Santa Monica. (424) 625-8233. ” target=”_blank”>coeurage.org.  


MON | AUG 19

“DREAD IN THE LITERATURE OF THE ANONYMOUS”

Josh Shachar discusses and signs his new book. A resident of Los Angeles and Caesarea, Israel, Shachar makes sure his characters are never all in one place, either. Following three separate journeys — an Algerian immigrant, a woman of broken faith and a watchmaker imprisoned in a labor camp — Shachar reveals that however different our journeys are, we do all journey. Mon. 7 p.m. Free. Book Soup, 8818 Sunset Blvd., West Hollywood. (310) 659-3110. TUE | AUG 20

ITZHAK PERLMAN

” target=”_blank”>hollywoodbowl.com.

“DON’T LET DESTINY CONTROL YOUR FUTURE”

In case you were planning to, don’t! Rabbi Lawrence Keleman offers an inspiring lecture on taking the reins and showing destiny the door. A Harvard-educated professor of modern and medieval philosophy at Neve Yerushalayim, the Jerusalem College for Jewish Women’s Studies, Keleman is just the man to introduce you to your future. Tue. 7:30 p.m. (reception and hors d’oeuvres), 8:15 p.m. (lecture). $7 (advance), $10 (door).Nessah Synagogue, 142 S. Rexford Drive, Beverly Hills. (310) 273-2400. THU | AUG 22

COMMUNITY CELEBRATION CONCERT

Perhaps the only thing just as timeless as family is music. Join the Schoenberg family as they celebrate the bar mitzvah of one of their younger members by honoring two of their oldest. Both hailing from Austria, Arnold Schoenberg and Eric Zeisl spent their lives composing music and contributing to a deserved Jewish place in its history. Conductor Nick Strimple and the Los Angeles Zimriyah Chorale, along with organist Iain Farrington, will bring some of those important liturgical works to life. Reception follows. Thu. 7 p.m. Free. RSVP required. Sinai Temple, 10400 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 409-2033. ” target=”_blank”>thesmell.org.

MARIA MULDAUR AND THE CAMPBELL BROTHERS

It’s a bluesy, funky, gospel kind of night. With vocals from Grammy-winning Muldaur (best known for “Midnight at the Oasis”) and the impressive all-around musicianship from a family of Campbells, the Skirball offers up a world-premiere collaboration. If your foot isn’t tapping, we don’t want to hear about it. Thu. 8 p.m. Free. Skirball Cultural Center, 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 440-4500. ” target=”_blank”>toaks.org/cap

Moving and Shaking: AJC gives 2013 Community Service Award, Taste of Summer raises $87,000


Rabbinic Leadership Institute graduates include Rabbis Denise Eger (second row, third from left), Ken Chasen (third row, third from right) and Stewart Vogel (front row, fourth from left). Rabbi Joshua Aaronson not pictured. Photo by Yonit Schiller

Rabbis Joshua Aaronson of Temple Judea in Tarzana, Ken Chasen of Leo Baeck Temple in Bel Air, Denise Eger of Congregation Kol Ami in West Hollywood and Stewart Vogel of Temple Aliyah in Woodland Hills were recently named senior rabbinic fellows at the Shalom Hartman Institute (SHI), following the rabbis’ completion of the institute’s Rabbinic Leadership Initiative.

The elite three-year program of study, reflection and professional development at SHI trains rabbis to transform Jewish life in North America. Participants spent a month each summer and a week each winter studying at the institute’s Jerusalem campus.

During a ceremony in Jerusalem on July 7, Yehuda Kurtzer, president of SHI of North America, praised the rabbis, calling them “teachers, students [and] visionaries.” Other speakers at the July gathering included MK Rabbi Dov Lipman of Israel’s Yesh Atid Party. 

Eger, who was among those in attendance, acknowledged the program’s rigorousness. “It wasn’t always so comfortable; we had to stretch,” she said.


Fred Stern. Photo by Michael Aurit

American Jewish Committee of Los Angeles (AJC) awarded Fred Stern its 2013 Community Service Award in June. Stern is on AJC’s national board of governors and the L.A. board of directors. 

The June 18 reception in honor of Stern, who works as a financial adviser to Morgan Stanley Smith Barney, took place at the Beverly Hills home of Debbie and Naty Saidoff. David Harris, executive director of AJC’s national office, delivered the evening’s keynote speech. More than 125 guests and AJC leaders attended.

AJC backers Madeline and Bruce Ramer co-hosted the event.


Tom Tugend

Steve Greenberg

The American Jewish Press Association has awarded Tom Tugend, Journal contributing editor, a first-place Simon Rockower Award for Excellence in Jewish Journalism for his feature story “A Legacy in Harmony,” published by Hadassah Magazine, and a first-place Rockower to Steve Greenberg, Journal editorial cartoonist, for “Greenberg’s View.”

Tugend’s article described how Ruth and Judea Pearl have turned their private grief into public good in the decade since their son, Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl, was kidnapped and murdered by Islamic extremists in Pakistan.

Meanwhile, Greenberg’s winning cartoons skewered 2012 former presidential candidate Mitt Romney’s desire to win the Jewish vote, former Iranian president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s anti-Israel rhetoric and the international community’s response to Israeli actions in the Gaza Strip. 


Fulfillment Fund Leadership Council member Todd Hawkins with chef Eric Greenspan, honorary event co-chair. Photo by Matt Sayles, Invision Agency by The Associated Press.

The second annual Taste of Summer, a food, wine and beer festival held at the Annenberg Community Beach House in Santa Monica on July 13, raised $87,000 for the Fulfillment Fund.

The college-access organization makes college “a reality for students growing up in educationally and economically under-resourced communities,” according to the Fulfillment Fund Web site.

Chef and Fulfillment Fund honorary chair Eric Greenspan co-hosted the gathering. Known for his cooking at The Foundry on Melrose and The Roof on Wilshire, Greenspan expressed support for the Fulfillment Fund in a statement: “I’ve always viewed my most cherished and important role as a chef is to be a teacher, so education is very important to me.”

Vendors included The Roof on Wilshire, Wolfgang Puck Catering, Whole Foods, Stone Brewing and others.

During the event, more than 400 attendees enjoyed bites, drink, music and silent auction – all just footsteps away from the beach.


From left: Floyd Glen-Lambert, president of Jewish Labor Committee's western region; Assembly Speaker Emeritus and honoree Bob Hertzberg and former City Controller Wendy Greuel. Photo by Beth Dubber.

The Jewish Labor Committee (JLC) Western Region’s annual awards brunch held last month marked the 79th anniversary of the organization, as the national group’s New York headquarters and Los Angeles office were established in 1934.

The event also honored Laphonza Butler, president of the Service Employees International Union-United Long Term Care Workers; Tom Walsh, president of Unite Here Local 11; and Assembly Speaker Emeritus Robert Hertzberg.

The July 14 ceremony in honor of JLC — which describes itself as the “Jewish voice in the labor movement, and the voice of the labor movement in the Jewish community” — took place at Loews Hollywood Hotel.

Butler, Walsh and Hertzberg received the Elinor Glenn Leadership Award, the Henry Fiering Union Advocacy Award and the Abe Levy Chaver Award, respectively.


Moving and Shaking acknowledges accomplishments by members of the local Jewish community, including people who start new jobs, leave jobs, win awards and more, as well as local events that featured leaders from the Jewish and Israeli communities. Got a tip? E-mail it to ryant@jewishjournal.com.

Moving and Shaking: Irwin Field honored, Rabbi Ari Segal elected, Breed Street Shul Project ceremony


Irwin Field

Former Jewish Journal publisher and board chair Irwin Field was honored by the United Way of Greater Los Angeles on June 25 with the organization’s Tocqueville Legacy Award. The honor from  the local division of the anti-poverty organization came during its 25th Alexis de Tocqueville Awards, held at the Getty Villa in Malibu.

The ceremony featured a performance by actress and musician Tia Carrere and remarks from Tocqueville member and former L.A. Mayor Richard Riordan.

Field, who remains a Journal board member and is CEO of Liberty Vegetable Oil, helped initiate the Tocqueville Society at United Way of Greater Los Angeles in 1988 while serving as board chair of the latter. According to the nonprofit’s Web site, the Tocqueville Society was created “to deepen individual understanding of, commitment to and support of United Way’s work.” The society acknowledges individuals who contribute a minimum of $10,000 to United Way and has raised more than $350 million since its inception. 


Mid City West community council board members includes new appointee Rabbi Ari Segal of Shalhevet School (second from right). Courtesy of Steven Rosenthal.

Rabbi Ari Segal, head of school at Shalhevet High School on Fairfax Avenue, was recently elected to the Mid City West (MCW) Community Council as a religious representative. Board members unanimously elected Segal during a June 12 meeting at the National Council of Jewish Women/Los Angeles council house.

The MCW council helps give neighborhoods a voice in policymaking and influence over city government, according to its Web site. 


From left: Stephen Sass, board president of the Breed Street Shul Project; husband-and-wife Barbara and Zev Yaroslavsky; East Side Jews' Jill Soloway; and Uri Resnick, deputy consul general of Israel in Los Angeles. Photo by Joel Lipton.

The Breed Street Shul Project honored Jill Soloway and Barbara and Zev Yaroslavsky during a ceremony last month. The June 23 event, “Praise for Our Past, Raise for Our Future,” took place at the Autry National Center. The evening included a private showing of the ongoing Autry exhibition “Jews in the Los Angeles Mosaic.”

A writer-director whose first feature film, “Afternoon Delight,” screened at the 2013 Sundance Film Festival, Soloway is a founding member of East Side Jews, a nondenominational collective of Jews on Los Angeles’ East Side that holds monthly events at unlikely venues. 

Los Angeles County Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky has served as an elected official for more than 35 years and is well known for his social-action activities on behalf of Soviet Jews and other Jewish causes. He has decided to leave public office at the end of his term in 2014.

His wife, Barbara, an ardent activist devoted to community and civic engagement, has lent her expertise to organizations such as the Zimmer Children’s Museum and Koreh L.A. and has participated in Latino-Jewish dialogue efforts. 

Established in 1999, the nonprofit Breed Street Shul Project has overseen the rehabilitation of the Boyle Heights-based Breed Street Shul. It works to bring together Jewish, Latino and other communities in Los Angeles. 


The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and Jewish War Veterans honor more than 20 World War II veterans in Culver City on Sunday, June 23. Courtesy of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (USHMM) last month joined the Jewish War Veterans of the United States of America (JWV) at the latter’s 75th annual statewide convention, where more than 20 World War II veterans were honored. The event took place at the Courtyard by Marriott in Culver City on June 23.

Lisa Zaid, Western region major gifts associate at USHMM, delivered a message of gratitude and hope to the World War II Jewish veterans on behalf of the nation’s living memorial to the Holocaust. Zaid also presented specially designed USHMM commemorative pins to each veteran. 

JWV provides nonsectarian assistance to veterans and advocates on behalf of Jewish issues. The USHMM in Washington, D.C., celebrated its 20th anniversary this year. It hosts programs, lectures, traveling exhibitions and more in Western cities, including Los Angeles, San Francisco, San Diego and Seattle.


Moving and Shaking acknowledges accomplishments by members of the local Jewish community, including people who start new jobs, leave jobs, win awards and more, as well as local events that featured leaders from the Jewish and Israeli communities. Got a tip? E-mail it to ryant@jewishjournal.com.

Moving and Shaking: Chris Silbermann, Morton Schapiro and Lawrence Trilling honored


From left: Saban Free Clinic CEO Jeffrey Bujer, producer Andy Friendly, ICM Partners founding partners Chris Silbermann and Bob Broder and producer David Friendly. Photo by Christianne Ray. 

The Saban Free Clinic, a medical clinic for the underserved, honored Chris Silbermann, founding partner of talent agency ICM Partners, during its 18th annual Golf Classic last month. 

The tournament was held at El Caballero Country Club in Tarzana on June 3. It is one of the largest fundraisers for the clinic, which has raised nearly $230,000 in funds this year and more than $3.5 million to fund medical, dental and behavioral health services since its inception.

Event chairs and co-chairs included music industry executive Irving Azoff, Lionsgate Motion Picture Group co-chairman Rob Friedman, producers Andy Friendly and David Friendly, entertainment lawyer John Frankenheimer, NBC Broadcasting chairman Ted Harbert and Marcia Steere.


Northwestern University president Morton Schapiro addresses Valley Torah High School's annual trustees dinner. Photo by Yehuda Remer.

Valley Torah High School honored Northwestern University President Morton Schapiro with its inaugural Education Leadership Award last month, in recognition of Schapiro’s encouragement of religious tolerance and sensitivity on the Evanston, Ill., campus.

Under his leadership, “Northwestern has changed its climate, attitude and atmosphere … and is attracting more high school graduates from Jewish communities throughout America,” Rabbi Avrohom Stulberger, Valley Torah’s dean, said in a statement.

Schapiro received the award during the Valley Torah annual trustees dinner on June 6, which took place at a private home in Valley Village. The dinner featured Schapiro addressing “The Role on Faith in Secular Universities.” Valley Torah alumni Rabbi George and Lisa Lintz chaired the dinner, which also promoted a scholarship fund of the Valley Village Orthodox school.

Recently, the mainstream media has spotlighted Valley Torah graduate Aaron Liberman, who played on Northwestern’s basketball team last year as a freshman. The team has accommodated the religious practices of Liberman, who is Orthodox. Lenard Liberman, Aaron’s father, was in attendance at the Valley Torah dinner.


Bend the Arc honoree and board member Lawrence Trilling with wife Jennifer Kattler Trilling and children, Jonah, Lyla, and Dahlia. Photo by Amy Tierney.

Bend the Arc: A Jewish Partnership for Justice honored television producer Lawrence Trilling (“Parenthood”) during its Pursuit of Justice gala last month.

Bend the Arc CEO Alan van Capelle. Photo by Amy Tierney.

Appearing at the June 9 dinner at the Petersen Automotive Museum, Trilling — a board member of the social justice organization — described himself as “a storyteller who tries to ennoble the people portrayed in stories and expand the capacity for empathy in people watching them. Those are Jewish values, and tonight I’m honored to be in a room full of people who live those values.” 

Trilling’s TV credits also include “Alias,” “Felicity,” “Pushing Daisies” and “Damages.” 

A nonprofit, Bend the Arc advocates for progressive positions on issues such as immigration, tax reform and more. 

Approximately 400 supporters of Bend the Arc turned out for the event. Bend the Arc CEO Alan van Capelle and Serena Zeise, Bend the Arc’s new Southern California regional director, delivered remarks. 

In addition to celebrating Trilling, the gala recognized the California Domestic Workers Coalition, which has fought for fair labor standards for the state’s domestic workers since 2006. Bend the Arc is a partner of the coalition. 


Julia Cosgrove, joined by her family, submits Pages of Testimony to Debbie Berman, manager of the Yad Vashem Shoah Victims' Names Recovery Project. Courtesy of Remember Us. 

During a visit to Israel last month, Los Angeles teen Julia Cosgrove submitted pages of testimony memorializing her grandfather’s family members who died in the Holocaust to the Yad Vashem Shoah Victims’ Name Recovery Project.

Organized by the Jerusalem-based institute, which is devoted to the research, documentation and education of the Holocaust, the worldwide project is part of an effort to recover the names of millions of Holocaust victims that remain unidentified.

Cosgrove’s grandfather, Gabriel Legmann, lost his three brothers and mother in the Shoah. Only Legmann and his father survived. The family was from Reteag, Romania.

Cosgrove, a student at the Harvard-Westlake School, is a participant of the Remember Us: The Holocaust B’nai Mitzvah Project. Run by Los Angeles nonprofit Remember Us, the project involves boys and girls remembering lost children from the Shoah during their b’nai mitzvah. Additionally, it has partnered with Yad Vashem to advance the work of the Shoah Victims’ Names Recovery Project in Los Angeles.

Cosgrove becomes a bat mitzvah this August, at Sinai Temple.    


Moving and Shaking acknowledges accomplishments by members of the local Jewish community, including people who start new jobs, leave jobs, win awards and more, as well as local events that featured leaders from the Jewish and Israeli communities. Got a tip? E-mail it to ryant@jewishjournal.com.

Calendar: June 22-28


Sunday, June 23: KINDRED SPIRITS

The Los Angeles Jewish Symphony, under the direction of Noreen Green, performs during this benefit concert with Grammy-winning singer-songwriter Melissa Manchester, musical theater star Cantor Ilysia Pierce, tenor Cantor Ilan Davidson, gospel soprano Diane White-Clayton and the Faithful Central Bible Church’s 60-voice gospel choir. Dr. Susan Love and Manchester will be honored with the 2013 KindredSPIRITS Humanitarian Award, for research contributions in the eradication of breast cancer and for artistic contributions in supporting cancer research, respectively. The event raises funds for the Cancer Support Community, an international nonprofit dedicated to providing support, education and hope to people affected by cancer. Sun. 7:30 p.m. $36-$180. Walt Disney Concert Hall, 111 S. Grand Ave., downtown. (323) 319-4849. kindredspiritslive.org.


SUN | JUNE 23 

“DIVAN” 

Filmmaker Pearl Gluck, living a secular life in Manhattan, must answer to her father, who wants her to marry and return to the Brooklyn Chasidic community she left behind as a teenager. Part memoir documentary and part travelogue, “Divan” follows Gluck as she travels to Hungary in her search for a family heirloom and encounters a colorful cast of characters, including a couch exporter, her ex-communist cousin in Budapest and a renegade group of formerly ultra-Orthodox Jews. CSUN Jewish studies faculty members Jody Myers and Jennifer Thompson participate in a post-screening Q-and-A. Sun. 10 a.m. Free (RSVP required, two-ticket maximum). Laemmle’s Town Center 5, 17200 Ventura Blvd., Encino. (818) 677-4724, jewish.studies@csun.edu. www.csun.edu/jewish.studies.


MON | JUNE 24

ASSOCIATION FOR ISRAEL STUDIES CONFERENCE

The 29th annual international gathering of Israel scholars meets for the first time on the West Coast to examine “Israel in the International Arena: Scholarship, Imagery, Discourse and Public Policy.” Highlights include a keynote discussion, “Israel, Zionism and the World,” led by former Israeli Foreign Minister Shlomo Ben-Ami; and a Wednesday plenary session, chaired by Journal President David Suissa, that explores “Israel Education and Scholarship: The Academy and the Community.” Mon. 6-7:15 p.m. (keynote). Through June 26. $160 (three-day conference), $20 (keynote only), free (plenary session only). Advance registration required. Keynote: UCLA campus, Schoenberg Hall, Los Angeles. Plenary session (June 26, 12:30-2 p.m.): UCLA campus, Dodd Hall, Room 147, Los Angeles. (310) 825-9646. international.ucla.edu/israel


TUE | JUNE 25 

JAMI ATTENBERG 

Attenberg’s latest novel, “The Middlesteins,” explores the strained bonds of a quirky Midwestern Jewish family. Richard Middlestein recently abandoned his wife of 30 years, Edie, who has a life-threatening obsession with food, and now it’s up to their kids to pick up the pieces. Today, Attenberg appears in person to discuss the comic-tragic family portrait, which was a Los Angeles Times Book Prize finalist. The event is part of the Diesel Author Luncheon series. Tue. noon-2 p.m. $55 (includes paperback copy of the book). Wilshire Restaurant, 2454 Wilshire Blvd., Santa Monica. (310) 576-9960. dieselbookstore.com.

ALBARE 

The jazz guitarist’s latest album, “The Road Ahead,” fuses his Moroccan roots with six-string influences ranging from Wes Montgomery to George Benson, while drawing on elements of blues and soul. Tue. 8:30 p.m. $20. Catalina Bar and Grill, 6725 W. Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. (323) 466-2210. catalinajazzclub.com.


THU | JUNE 27 

DODGERS JEWISH COMMUNITY NIGHT 

A pre-game tribute to the great Sandy Koufax kicks off the 14th annual Jewish Community Night. After, enjoy a kosher nosh, including hot dogs provided by Jeff’s Gourmet Kosher Sausage Factory, as you watch the Boys in Blue (and white) take on the Philadelphia Phillies. The first 50,000 fans in attendance receive a Sandy Koufax bobblehead. Thu. 7:10 p.m. $25-$210. Dodgers Stadium, 1000 Elysian Park Ave., Los Angeles. (323) 224-4287. losangeles.dodgers.mlb.com.

“KESHET @ 30”

For the past 30 years, the Keshet Chaim Dance Ensemble has entertained audiences around the world with its blend of ethnic, melodic and rhythmic movement. Tonight, the Israeli-American nonprofit dance company celebrates its anniversary by performing a fundraising concert at American Jewish University. Guests include singer-songwriter Meshi Kleinstein, daughter of Israeli megastars Rita and Rami Kleinstein. Israeli actress Yafit Josephson (“New Eyes”) hosts the event. Thu. 8 p.m. $50-$100. American Jewish University, Gindi Auditorium, 15600 Mulholland Drive, Bel Air. (818) 986-7332. kcdancers.org.

NEIL GAIMAN

The acclaimed author of “Coraline,” “The Graveyard Book,” the comic book series “The Sandman” and the award-winning “American Gods” discusses his well-received new novel, “The Ocean at the End of the Lane,” with Entertainment Weekly’s Geoff Boucher. Thu. 8 p.m. $40-$103. Alex Theatre, 216 N. Brand Blvd., Glendale. (818) 243-2539. alextheatre.org

2013 Passover calendar


SAT | MARCH 16

TEMPLE JUDEA
Celebrate Passover, Shabbat and family during a Tot Shabbat with Rabbi Karen Bender, Cantor Alison Wissot and Len Levitt and the Levitty Puppets. Sat. 9:30 a.m. Free. Temple Judea, 5429 Lindley Ave., Tarzana. (818) 758-3800. templejudea.com.


SUN | MARCH 17

“THE DOWNTOWN SEDER”
Clergy and community leaders, including Ruth Messinger, president and executive director of American Jewish World Service; Imam Jihad Turk, director of religious affairs for the Islamic Center of Southern California; the Rev. Mark Whitlock, executive director of the USC Cecil Murray Center for Community Engagement; Rabbi Ed Feinstein of Valley Beth Shalom; and Rabbi Mark Borovitz of Beit T’Shuvah, appear at this interfaith urban Passover experience. Held at the new Pico Union, a revival of the historic site of the first Sinai Temple, the event provides inspiration and insight through song, stories and more, all in celebration of the themes of Passover. A light reception follows. Sun. 2-4 p.m. Free-$72. Pico Union, 1153 Valencia St., downtown. (818) 760-1077. downtownseder.eventbrite.com (the Journal will live-stream this program at jewishournal.com/downtown_seder).

“MEM: A REVOLUTIONARY ROCK MUSICAL”
In Hebrew, “Miriam,” “Moses,” “Mitzrayim” (Hebrew for “Egypt”), “makot” (Hebrew for plagues) and “miracle” all begin with mem, the 13th letter of the Hebrew alphabet. Drawing on Torah, midrash and the imagination of Bill Burnett, who wrote the book, lyrics and music to this concert event, “Mem” follows the Hebrew slaves’ insurgency against their oppressors in Egypt. A lively discussion follows. Sun. 2 p.m. Free (donations welcome). Adat Ari El, Farber Auditorium, 12020 Burbank Blvd., Valley Village. (818) 766-9426. adatariel.org.

THE HOLLYWOOD CANTORS
Cantors Samuel Cohen, Jonathan Friedmann, Marcus Feldman and Netanel Baram perform songs in Yiddish, Hebrew and Italian during “Exodus: A Passover Concert.” Angela Bae (violin), Susan Greenberg (flute) and Carmit Baram (bassoon) provide accompaniment. Presented by the City of West Hollywood’s Russian Advisory Board. Sun. 3 p.m. $20 (suggested donation). Plummer Park, Fiesta Hall, 7377 Santa Monica Blvd., West Hollywood. (323) 868-2623. weho.org.


TUE | MARCH 19

PASSOVER CITY HALL CELEBRATION
Elected leaders, synagogue members, students and others come together to celebrate. Sing songs of liberation, nosh on matzah and macaroons, and rejoice. For security and parking reasons, RSVP no later than Thursday, March 14, to Barri Worth at barri.worth@lacity.org. Tue. Noon-1 p.m. Free. L.A. City Hall Rotunda, 200 N. Spring St., Los Angeles. (323) 761-8600. boardofrabbis.org.

FOOD JUSTICE SEDER
American Jewish World Service (AJWS), The Jewish Federation of Greater Los Angeles, MAZON: A Jewish Response to Hunger and Netiya come together for an interactive evening of food, conversation and study. AJWS President Ruth Messinger; Cari Uslan, development director of MAZON; and Rabbi Noah Farkas, founder of Netiya, offer insights about food justice and Passover. Also, learn how to advocate for ending hunger and meet like-minded Jews. Tue. 7 p.m. Free. The Hub on Venice, 11827 Venice Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 843-9588. ajws.org.


THU | MARCH 21

ITALIAN PASSOVER WITH JUDY AND MARVIN ZEIDLER
Famed chefs and restaurateurs Judy and Marvin Zeidler host a not-so-traditional Passover feast based on Judy’s recent book, “Italy Cooks.” Between courses, the Zeidlers reminiscence about Italy and discuss Italian Jewish cuisine. Menu includes whitefish mousse on romaine heart leaves with fried sage leaves and anchovy, Tuscan porcini soup, roast spring lamb with green sauce Piedmont and chocolate mousse with chocolate hazelnut. All recipes are kosher for Passover. All wines are kosher. Thu. 7 p.m. $80 (general), $95 (includes wine). Advance tickets required (sales end on March 18). Skirball Cultural Center, 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 440-4500. skirball.org.

VALLEY RUACH
The young professionals organization (ages 21-39) holds a chocolate seder, led by Jessica Kendler Yarkin, Ruach’s rabbinic student leader, and veteran pastry chef and chocolatier Jonathan Solomon. One golden ticket ensures admittance to this feast, which, to paraphrase Willy Wonka, will be 93 percent perspiration, 6 percent electricity, 4 percent evaporation, 2 percent butterscotch ripple and 0 percent matzah. Thu. 7 p.m. $10 (RSVP requested). Adat Ari El, 12020 Burbank Blvd., Valley Village. (818) 766-9426. valleyruach.org.


SUN | MARCH 24

“FUN AND WACKY PASSOVER FAMILY ADVENTURE”
The Shalom Institute in Malibu invites young children and their families to travel back in time to biblical Egypt and relive the Exodus. Kids toil the land and gather parsley for Passover; watch the Ten Plagues come to life; make holiday crafts or the seder table; ride the zip line across the Red Sea to freedom and make matzah over an open fire. Sun. 1-4 p.m. Free. Shalom Institute, 34342 Mulholland Highway, Malibu. (818) 889-5500. shalominstitute.com.


MON | MARCH 25

JAR
Chef Suzanne Tracht’s acclaimed restaurant offers a special Passover dinner and seder to celebrate the first night of the holiday. The four-course meal merges Tracht’s family holiday traditions with the flavors of Jar, a modern chophouse. Enjoy hors d’oeuvres of house-cured salmon and crispy potato pancakes, matzah ball soup in lemongrass broth and a main course of Jar signature’s pot roast or sautéed Alaskan halibut. Family-style sides include horseradish mashed potatoes and sautéed pea tendrils. Macaroons, cheesecake and more highlight the dessert plate. Author Racelle Rosett leads the service with Rabbi Susan Goldberg. Singer-songwriter Sally Dworsky provides musical entertainment. Guests are encouraged to donate to MAZON : A Jewish Response to Hunger. Mon. 5:30 p.m. $130 (per adult), $55 (per child younger than 12). Jar, 8225 Beverly Blvd., Los Angeles. (323) 655-6566. thejar.com.


TUE | MARCH 26

“SEPHARDIC PASSOVER SEDER”
Sephardic Singles Havurah (ages 40s-70s) invites the community to its Sephardic seder, which is led in Ladino, English and Hebrew and overlooks on ocean sunset at a Pacific Palisades location. Haifa Restaurant caters the Sephardic-style dinner. RSVP with your check must be received by March 18. Tue. 4:30 p.m. $30 (Havurah members), $40 (guests). (323) 294-6084.

THE JEWISH HOME COMMUNITY SEDER
Enjoy a seder experience with the Jewish Home’s family of residents and supporters. Tue. 5 p.m. $40 (per adult), $30 (per adult family member of Jewish Home residents). $15 (per child younger than 12). Advance tickets required (sales end March 18). Los Angeles Jewish Home, Eisenberg Village Camps, 18855 Victory Blvd., Reseda. (818) 774-3386. www.jha.org.

“COMMUNITIES OF THE WORLD”
Experience a second-night seder with customs and charoset from Jewish communities across the globe. Tue. 6:15-9 p.m. $52 (nonmember adult), $27 (member child, ages 3-13), $48 (member adult), $32 (nonmember child, ages 3-13). Shomrei Torah Synagogue, 7353 Valley Circle Blvd., West Hills. (818) 346-0811. stsonline.org.

“REDEMPTION AND RESPONSIBILITY” SEDER
Join AJWS, Global Circle, ATID and Moishe House for a second-night seder, designed for singles and couples (ages 21-39), that focuses on how our freedom story inspires global justice today. A three-course kosher gourmet meal will be served. Tue. 6:30 p.m. $44 (reservations required). Sinai Temple, 10400 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 481-3244. atidla.com/calendars/atid-7th-annual-2nd-night-seder.


WED | MARCH 27

BEIT T’SHUVAH PASSOVER
The rehabilitation center hosts a special third-night seder with a presentation of its original musical, “Freedom Song.” Wed. 6:30-8:30 p.m. $26. Beit T’Shuvah, 8831 Venice Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 204-5200. beittshuvah.org.


THU | MARCH 28

WOMEN’S PASSOVER SEDER
Experience the seder through the eyes of women, sing women’s Passover songs and feast on a kosher-for-Passover dinner. One of the National Council of Jewish Women/Los Angeles’ most anticipated and well-attended annual events, this get-together aims to be meaningful and inspiring. Thu. 6:30-9:30 p.m. $36 (members), $46 (general). NCJW/LA Council House, 543 N. Fairfax Ave., Los Angeles. (323) 651-2930. ncjwla.org/womens-passover-seder.

Purim event calendar 2013


ALL AGES

FRI | FEB 22

TEMPLE JUDEA
A three-day carnival includes rides, food, games and a kids’ zone. Fri. Through Feb 24. Presale: $17 (20 tickets), $35 (Friday wristband), $25 (Saturday wristband), $45 (Sunday wristband); day-of prices: $1.25 (per-ride ticket), $20 (20-ride tickets), $40 (50-ride tickets, Friday wristband, Saturday wristband), $50 (Sunday wristband). Temple Judea, 5429 Lindley Ave., Tarzana. (818) 758-3800. templejudea.com.


SAT | FEB 23

“PURIM PANDEMON!UM”
University Synagogue’s carnival features Moe Deli and Canter’s food trucks, games, rides, prizes and more. Fun for kids and adults alike. Sat. 5-9 p.m. $20 (presale), $25 (door). University Synagogue, 11960 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 472-1255. unisyn.org.

“HAMEN’S HOLLYWOOD”
Join Kehillat Ma’arav for a megillah reading, raffle, dinner, costume parade, a game of “Hamen’s Hollywood Squares” and more. Sat. 6 p.m. Free. Kehillat Ma’arav, 1715 21st St., Santa Monica. (310) 829-0566. km-synagogue.org.

“SHUSHAN IDOL”
Beth Chayim Chadashim’s Purim bash features musical performances by mystery celebrity guests, a multilingual reading of the megillah, multimedia storytelling of the book of Esther and a sing-along. Sat. 6 p.m. (bring your dinner), 6:30-7 p.m. (children’s festivities), 7 p.m. (Havdalah, “Shushan Idol” and megillah reading). Free. Beth Chayim Chadashim, 6090 W. Pico Blvd., Los Angeles. (323) 931-7023. bcc-la.org.

NASHUVA
The progressive congregation stages a megillah rock opera. Sat. 6:30 p.m. Free. Location TBD. nashuva.com.

“PURIM GRAMMY’S”
Sinai Temple’s Purim-themed sendup of the annual music awards show features Sinai staff and students doing impersonations of the some of biggest pop stars, including Taylor Swift, Cee Lo Green, Rihanna, Maroon 5 and Carly Rae Jepsen. Traditional megillah reading follows. Sat. 6:30 p.m. (Havdalah and show). Free. Sinai Temple, 10400 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 474-1518. sinaitemple.org.

SEPHARDIC TEMPLE
Games, rides, prizes and other entertainment highlight the Conservative synagogue’s carnival. Sat. 6:30 p.m. $10 (member, presale), $14 (members, door), $15 (general, presale), $20 (general, door). Sephardic Temple Tifereth Israel, 10500 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 475-7000. sephardictemple.org.

“LES MIZ-SHUGINAH GIRL”
Congregation Kol Ami’s Purim spiel is a classic tale of love, politics and the Academy Awards. Sat. 7-10 p.m. Free. Congregation Kol Ami, 1200 N. La Brea Ave., West Hollywood. (323) 606-0996. kol-ami.org.

“A NIGHT AT THE ESTHERS”
Shomrei Torah’s Oscar-themed Purim spiel and party features live music and entertainment, clips from the best picture nominees, photo opportunities and more. Walk the red carpet in your Esther’s best. Sat. 7:30 p.m. Free. Shomrei Torah Synagogue, 7353 Valley Circle Blvd., West Hills. (818) 346-0811. Stsonline.org.

BETH JACOB CONGREGATION
Games and prizes, a costume contest, dancing, a dunk tank, food, moon bounce, music and rock climbing highlight the Orthodox synagogue’s Purim carnival. Sat. 7:30 p.m. (immediately after a megillah reading). Free entry. Beth Jacob Congregation, 9030 W. Olympic Blvd., Beverly Hills. (310) 795-3857. bethjacob.org/eventscalendar.html.

“FIFTY SHADES OF PURIM”
Larger Than Life, a charity dedicated to improving the lives of children who have cancer, celebrates Purim — and its 10th anniversary — with food, drinks, a costume contest and surprises. DJ Eyal spins. Sat. 8 p.m. $85. Unici Casa Gallery, 9461 Jefferson Blvd., Culver City. (818) 887-7640. largerthanlifela.com/purim/purim_2013.php.

TEMPLE ALIYAH
Aliyah’s Purim carnival, which lasts two days this year, features a battle-of-the-bands for middle school and high school students — the winning band gets four hours of studio recording time — rides, games and more. Sat. 8-11 p.m. (battle-of-the-bands), Sun. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Presale: $65 (unlimited all-day ride bracelet — Saturday and Sunday), $40 (unlimited all-day ride bracelet — Saturday night only), $45 (unlimited all-day ride bracelet — Sunday only). Temple Aliyah, 6025 Valley Circle Blvd., Woodland Hills. (818) 346-3545. templealiyah.org.


SUN | FEB 24

JUSTICE CARNIVAL
Join progressive congregation IKAR for family-friendly fun and activities. Sun. 10 a.m. $15 (members), $20 (general). Adult admission included. IKAR, 5870 W. Olympic Blvd., Los Angeles. (323) 634-1870. ikar-la.org.

PURIMland
Wilshire Boulevard Temple’s religious school’s carnival features food, arts and crafts, a bake sale, a Candyland zone and more. Sun. 10 a.m. $55 (wristband, presale), $65 (wristband, door). Wilshire Boulevard Temple, Audrey and Sydney Irmas Campus, 11661 W. Olympic Blvd., Los Angeles. (213) 388-2401. wbtla.org.

TEMPLE AKIBA
A petting zoo, video game stations, food, games, prizes and a silent auction highlight the Culver City synagogue’s carnival. Sun. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. $10 (24 tickets, presale). Temple Akiba, 5249 S. Sepulveda Blvd., Culver City. (310) 398-5783. templeakiba.net.

“THE SULTAN OF OZ”
Valley Beth Shalom’s Purim carnival features games, prizes, attractions and food. All proceeds benefit VBS Israel programs and summer camp financial aid. Sun. 10 a.m-3 p.m. Free entry. Valley Beth Shalom, Ventura parking lot, Malkin-Burdorf Hall and Glaser Hall. (818) 788-6000. vbs.org.

SHOMREI TORAH
Rides, games, food and more highlight Shomrei Torah Synagogue’s carnival and street fair. Sun. 10:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Pre-sale: $70 (family fun pack), $25 (wristband), $18 (20 tickets). Shomrei Torah Synagogue, 7353 Valley Circle Blvd., West Hills. (818) 346-0811. stsonline.org.

STEPHEN S. WISE TEMPLE
Rides, food, a raffle and more highlight what is one of the Reform synagogue’s largest fundraisers and most popular volunteer days. Sun. 10:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. $36 (presale). Adult admission is free, but scrip must be purchased for food, rides and games. Stephen S. Wise Temple, 15500 Stephen S. Wise Drive, Los Angeles. (310) 889-2300. wisela.org.

BETH SHIR SHALOM
A moon bounce, snow cones, dunk tank, face painting, bake sale and games highlight the Santa Monica congregation’s Purim carnival. Sun. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Free entry. Beth Shir Shalom, 1827 California Ave., Santa Monica. (310) 453-3361. bethshirshalom.org.

LEO BAECK TEMPLE
Live music, hamantashen, games, prizes and more highlight Leo Baeck’s spiel and carnival. Sun. 11 a.m. Free entry. Leo Baeck Temple, 1300 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 476-2861. leobaecktemple.org.

TEMPLE EMANUEL
Pinkberry, In-N-Out Burger, Sprinkles Cupcakes — these are just some of the food choices at Emanuel’s annual Purim carnival. Other highlights include the Aquarium of the Pacific on wheels, a “Diva Makeover” station, an inflatable rock hall and more. Rain or shine. Sun. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Presale: $100 (120 tickets), $75 (90 tickets), $50 (60 tickets). Temple Emanuel of Beverly Hills, Steinbaum Burton Way Building, 8844 Burton Way, Beverly Hills. (818) 849-5737. tebh.org.

TEMPLE ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD
Activities for all ages highlight the Hollywood synagogue’s carnival. Sun. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Presale: $100 (135 tickets), $75 (100 tickets), $50 (67 tickets), $25 (33 tickets). Temple Israel of Hollywood, 7300 Hollywood Blvd., Los Angeles. (323) 876-8330. tioh.org.

“THE WHOLE MEGILLAH”
Temple Ahavat Shalom’s Mardi Gras-style carnival features food trucks, games, rides and more. Includes a wine tasting for adults. Sun. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. $45 (all-inclusive, presale), $50 (all inclusive, day of event). Other pricing options available. Temple Ahavat Shalom, 18200 Rinaldi Place, Northridge. (818) 360-2258. tasnorthridge.org/purim.

TEMPLE ADAT ELOHIM
More than 20 rides, games and attractions highlight Adat Elohim’s Purim bash. Sun. 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. $15 (presale), $20 (door).  Temple Adat Elohim, 2420 E. Hillcrest Drive, Thousand Oaks. (805) 497-7101. adatelohim.org.


TUE | FEB 26

“PURIM AT THE PIER”
Kehillat Israel’s Purim celebration includes rides, games, food and more. Tue. 4-8 p.m. $30 (wristband, includes free dinner), $10 (game swipe card) $25 (three-game swipe card). Pacific Park, 380 Santa Monica Pier, Santa Monica. (310) 459-2328. ourki.org.


SUN | MARCH 3

TEMPLE BETH AM
Rides, games, a magic show and arts and crafts highlight Beth Am’s carnival. The synagogue needs 150 volunteers to run the event. Sun. 11 a.m. $10 (tickets), $50 (wristbands). Temple Beth Am, 1039 S. La Cienega Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 652-7353. tbala.org.


ADULTS AND/OR YOUNG ADULTS

SAT | FEB 23

“A MAGICAL PURIM EXTRAVAGANZA”
Temple Adat Elohim’s party features three magicians (stage, parlor and close-up) from the Magic Castle performing illusions and prestidigitation. Includes live auction, hors d’oeuvres, dessert and no-host bar. Sat. 6 p.m. (hors d’oeuvres and cocktails), 7:30 p.m. (magic show). $50. Temple Adat Elohim, 2420 E. Hillcrest Drive, Thousand Oaks. (805) 497-7101. adatelohim.org.

“PURIM IN THE VALLEY”
Valley Ruach’s carnival exclusively for young professionals features an inflatable gladiator joust, arcade basketball, a costume contest, raffle, silent auction, carnival games and open bar with beer, wine and well drinks. Ages 21-39 only. Sat. 6:45 p.m. (megillah reading with Adat Ari El community), 8 p.m. (carnival), 9 p.m. (joust tournament), 9:30 p.m. (basketball tournament). 10:30 p.m. (costume contest). $25 (presale), $30 (door). Adat Ari El, 12020 Burbank Blvd., Valley Village. (818) 835-2139. valleyruach.org.

“PROM NIGHT PURIM”
Bring out the tuxes and gowns to relive that iconic evening, as Leo Baeck Temple’s truly post-adolescent event features music, drinks, hors d’oeuvres, desserts and more.  Sat. 7 p.m. $20. Leo Baeck Temple, 1300 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 476-2861. leobaecktemple.org.

THE GROUNDLINGS
Performing a show created exclusively for Wilshire Boulevard Temple, the nationally acclaimed comedy troupe presents improvisations on the story of Esther. For teens and adults only. Sat. 7-8:45 p.m. (Korean barbecue buffet and no-host bar), 7:45-8:45 p.m. (Groundlings Improv show and megillah reading). Free. Wilshire Boulevard Temple, Temple campus, 3663 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (424) 208-8932. wbtla.org.

“THE PURIM PROM”
AtidLA’s party for young professionals features a live DJ, food, a costume contest and more. JSpace co-sponsors. Sat. 9 p.m. $18 (advance), $25 (door). Tiato, 2700 Colorado Ave., No. 190, Santa Monica. (310) 481-3244. atidla.com.

JUSTICE CARNIVAL
Join progressive congregation IKAR for a night of Purim-themed debauchery, with drinks, games and light snacks. Sat. 9 p.m. $20 (members, not including cash bar), $25 (general, not including cash bar). IKAR, 5870 W. Olympic Blvd., Los Angeles. (323) 634-1870. ikar-la.org.

“QUEEN ESTHER’S MASQUERADE BALL”
Temple Beth Israel of Highland Park and Eagle Rock throws a party with an open bar, live DJ and dancing until 2 a.m. Hip-hop artist AB SOTO performs. 21 and older. Sat. 9 p.m. $30. Highland Park Mason Building, 104. N. Avenue 56, Los Angeles. (323) 255-5416, tbila.org/purim.

PURIMPALOOZA X: “DISCO FEVER”
Dust off the polyester, platforms and Jewfros and head down to Steingarten LA, a gourmet beer garden, for a ’70s-themed party. Organized by JConnectLA. 21 and older. Sat. 10 p.m.-2 a.m. (megillah readings at 10:30 p.m., 11:30 p.m. and 12:30 p.m.). $10 (advance), $20 (door). Steingarten L.A., 10543 W. Pico Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 277-5544. jconnectla.com/2013/02/purimpalooza-x-disco-fever.


SUN | FEB 24

THE SHANGRI LA PURIM BALL
Celebrate Purim — and the Jewish state — at the Creative Zionist Coalition’s party in Santa Monica. The evening includes an open wine-and-beer bar, hors d’oeuvres, a program honoring pro-Israel bloggers Pamela Geller and Robert Spencer, and more. Sun. 5 p.m. (hors d’oeuvres), 6 p.m. (program and dancing). Hotel Shangri-La, 1301 Ocean Ave., Santa Monica. creativezionistcoalition.org.

Chanukah calendar 2012/5773


SAT | DEC 1

MIXOLOGY 101: HANUKOCKTAILS

Enjoy this evening as a date night or a chance to catch up with old friends and mingle with new ones while mixing delicious drinks. Sat. 8 p.m. $30 (drinks and appetizers included). Kehillat Israel, 16019 Sunset Blvd., Pacific Palisades. (310) 459-2328. kehillatisrael.org.


SUN | DEC 2

AMERICANA HANUKKAH

The Skirball’s annual family festival celebrates freedom, justice and democracy. Performers include puppeteer and storytelling troupe Story Pirates, pop-rock band the Macaroons, the Marcus Shelby Quintet, storyteller Karen Golden and klezmer-gypsy band Kalinka. Sun. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. $10 (general), $7 (seniors, full-time students). Skirball Cultural Center, 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd, Los Angeles. (310) 440-4500. skirball.org.

JGSLA HANNUKAH PARTY

This Jewish Genealogical Society of Los Angeles event also includes a discussion on “Finding Living People on the Internet” with Ron Arons and “Ask the Experts.” Sun. 1 p.m. Free. University Synagogue, 11960 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. (818) 433-6599. jgsla.org.

FIESTA CHANUKAH PARTY

It has been nearly 20 years since the Chanukah lights have been lit inside the Breed Street Shul. Today’s celebration includes latkes and churros to eat, dreidels to play with, cookie decorating for the kids and tours of the campus. Sun. 1:30-4:30 p.m. $36 (adults), $18 (ages 13 and under). The Breed Street Shul, 247 N. Breed St., Los Angeles. (323) 881-4850. breedstreetshul.org/tickets

HANUKKAH FESTIVAL

Join the Zimmer Museum for a light-themed activities including story time, holiday crafts and more. Sun. $8 (adults), $5 (children) 12:30-5 p.m. Zimmer Children’s Museum, 6505 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 100, Los Angeles. (323) 761-8984. zimmermuseum.org.


WED | DEC 5

NINTH ANNUAL HANUKKAH PARTY

Join the W Group for happy-hour food and drinks, a raffle and hors d’oeuvres. Proceeds benefit Jewish World Watch. Wed. 7-10 p.m. $25 (pre-sale), $40 (door). Sur Lounge, 612 N. Robertson Blvd., West Hollywood. (310) 476-8561. wisela.org/w-group-calendar.


THU | DEC 6

CHANUKAH FREYLEKH

Yiddish song, Yiddish dance and an art show highlight the festivities. Refreshments served. Proceeds benefit the Los Angeles Regional Food Bank. Thu. 7:30 p.m. $10-$20 (sliding scale donation). Workmen’s Circle, 1525 S. Robertson Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 552-2007. circlesocal.org.

“TACKLING DIVERSITY IN DECEMBER”

Wondering how to talk to your child about the diversity of holidays that bombard them in December? Join IKAR’s Rabbi Rebecca Rosenthal and Beth Weisman for a tonight’s discussion. Thu. 7:30-9 p.m. Free. IKAR Early Childhood Center, 1564 S. Burnside Ave., Los Angeles. (323) 634-1870. ikar-la.org.


FRI | DEC 7

NASHUVA/JEWISH FEDERATION TOY DIVE

For the fourth year in a row, progressive community Nashuva and The Jewish Federation of Greater Los Angeles are joining forces to collect toys for distribution to children all over L.A. County for the holidays. Please bring new toys and books to Nashuva. Volunteers requested to take the donated toys and books from Nashuva and deliver them to The Jewish Federation. Fri. 6:30 p.m. Free. Brentwood Presbyterian Church, 12000 W. San Vicente Blvd., Los Angeles. nashuva.com.


SAT | DEC 8

WESTFIELD VALENCIA TOWN CENTER

Join local synagogues for a menorah lighting, music, games and refreshments in Town Center Square. 6 p.m. Westfield Valencia Town Center, 24201 W. Valencia Blvd., Valencia. westfield.com/valencia.

CHABAD OF MALIBU

Join Chabad of Malibu for a concert with the band Moshav, a public menorah lighting and latkes. 6:30 p.m. (VIP cocktail reception). 7:30 p.m. (concert). $25 (concert), $250 (VIP reception and concert). Malibu City Hall, 23825 Stuart Ranch Road, Malibu. (310) 456-6588. jewishmalibu.com.


SUN | DEC 9

SANTA MONICA PLACE

Beth Shir Shalom’s Rabbi Neil Comess-Daniels and Cantor Diane Rose will be on the main stage as visitors enjoy music, arts and crafts and latkes in a celebration of Chanukah. Sun. 10 a.m. Free. The Market at Santa Monica Place, dining deck on level 3, 295 Santa Monica Place, Santa Monica. (310) 453-3361. bethshirshalom.org/community/events-calendar.

SILVERLAKE INDEPENDENT JCC FESTIVAL OF LIGHTS

Don’t miss a fun-filled day for the whole family. Sun. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Free. Silverlake Independent JCC, 1110 Bates Ave., Los Angeles. (323) 663-2255. sijcc.net.

ISRAELI SCOUTS

Join the Israeli Scouts, the Israel Leadership Council and Ha’bait Ha’Israeli at a Chanukah happening. Arts and crafts, music and a kids show make this a party for the entire family. All ages. Sun. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Masonic Lodge, 2244 Westwood Blvd., Los Angeles. (323) 304-0708. jewishla.org.

ORT CHANUKAH BRUNCH

ORT America recognizes the achievements of Ann Spicer, a Holocaust survivor and ORT supporter. Other guests include keynote speaker David Suissa, Tribe Media Corp/Jewish Journal president, and concert pianist Marrina. Sun. 11 a.m. $180. Beverly Hills Hotel, Rodeo Ballroom, 9641 W. Sunset Blvd., Beverly Hills. (323) 966-0092. ortamerica.org.

WESTFIELD FASHION SQUARE CENTER

Chabad of Sherman Oaks partners with Westfield Fashion Square for a menorah lighting, Chanukah sand art, live music, dancing, food, games and a performance by the Chabad Hebrew School. 2-4 p.m. Westfield Fashion Square, 14006 Riverside Drive, Sherman Oaks. chabadso.com.

FARMERS MARKET HANUKKAH CELEBRATION

The Farmers Market hosts children’s activities, a “Chanukah Pajamikah” performance with cantorial soloist Doda Mollie and a menorah lighting ceremony. Sun. 2:30-5 p.m. Free. The Original Farmers Market, 6333 W. Third St., Los Angeles. (323) 933-9211. farmersmarketla.com/special_events/index.asp.

UNIVERSAL CITYWALK

Chabad of the Valley partners with Universal CityWalk to host the 11th annual “Festival of Lights” celebration. Featuring a concert performance by 8th Day. 6 p.m. Free. Universal CityWalk Hollywood, 100 Universal City Plaza, Los Angeles. chabadofthevalley.org.

“A CANTOR’S JOYFUL JOURNEY”

Cantor Jen Roher headlines tonight’s concert at Temple Ahavat Shalom. Other performers include Cantors Leigh Korn, Barbara Ostfeld, Bruce Ruben and Patti Linsky. Sun. 7 p.m.$25 (general), $10 (students). Temple Ahavat Shalom, 18200 Rinaldi Place, Northridge. (818) 360-2258. tasnorthridge.org/cantorsconcert.php.


MON | DEC 10

CSUN CHABAD

The Department of Jewish Studies joins CSUN Chabad for a public menorah lighting, latkes, dreidel games, doughnuts and gelt. 5 p.m. In front of the Oviatt Library at California State University, Northridge, 18111 Nordhoff St., Northridge. chabadcsun.com.

DEMOCRATS OF ISRAEL-LOS ANGELES

The organization hosts a Chanukah party, featuring food, entertainment and a candle-lighting ceremony. The event also celebrates President Obama’s forthcoming inauguration. Mon. 7-9 p.m. $20. Workmen’s Circle, 1525 S. Robertson Blvd., Los Angeles. (818) 389-5854. dfi-la.org.


TUE | DEC 11

KEHILLAT MA’ARAV CANDLELIGHTING AND DINNER

After the 6 p.m. lighting of the chanukiyah on Third Street Promenade, everyone walks to dinner at Trastevere Italian Restaurant. Dinners must be pre-paid. Tue. 6 p.m. $20 (adults), $10 (kids 4-12), free (ages 3 and under). Trastevere, 1360 Third St., Santa Monica. (310) 829-0566. km-synagogue.org.

OHR HATORAH CELEBRATION

The congregation’s religious school kids take the stage for a holiday musical performance. The Ohr HaTorah band also performs. Dinner included. Tue. 6 p.m. Ohr HaTorah Congregation, 11827 Venice Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 915-5200. ohrhatorah.org.

COMMONS AT CALABASAS

Menorah lighting, fireworks, music, jelly donuts, latkas and more. Tue. 6:30 p.m. Free. The Commons at Calabasas, 4799 Commons Way, Calabasas. (818) 724-7485. calabasasshul.org/chanuka-ceremony.


WED | DEC 12

“FINDING THE LIGHT…THE SPIRITUALITY OF DARK DAYS”

Come for an evening of food and wisdom as Rabbi Mark Borovitz teaches about using the light of the Maccabees to fend off the darkness in our world. Wed. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free (RSVP by Dec. 5). Beit T’Shuvah. 8831 Venice Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 204-5200. beittshuvah.org.


THU | DEC 13

NORTHRIDGE FASHION CENTER

Enjoy a public menorah lighting and holiday festivities on the upper-level, near Ben Bridge Jeweler. Sponsored by Temple Ahavat Shalom. 6:30 p.m. Northridge Fashion Center, 9301 Tampa Ave., Northridge. northridgefashioncenter.com.

LIGHT THE NIGHT

Enjoy a community Chanukah celebration, live music and a latke dinner. Thu. 6:30-9:30 p.m. $25 (adult), $18 (ages 3-13), free (ages 0-2). Shomrei Torah Synagogue, 7353 Valley Circle Blvd., West Hills. (818) 346-0811. stsonline.org.

BINA LA HANUKKAH BALL

Enjoy jelly donuts and chocolate gelt at a holiday dessert table, create lasting memories with photo booth fun, enjoy libations at the open bar (8-10 p.m.) and prepare for many more surprises. Bring a new and unwrapped toy for charity and enter to win prizes. Ages 25-45. Thu. 8 p.m.-1 a.m. $18 (pre-sale), $35 (door). Leonardo’s, 831 S. La Brea Blvd., Los Angles. binala.org/bina-events/hanukkah-ball-2012.


SAT | DEC 15

CHANUKAH DINNER DANCE

Makom Ohr Shalom’s celebration features latkes, chef Rico Mandel in the kitchen and music by D.J. Franky Dee. Sat. 7:30-11:30 p.m. $20. Bethel Lutheran Church, 17500 Burbank Blvd., Encino. (818) 725-7600. makom.org/chanukah_dance_2012_R1.pdf.


SUN | DEC 16

CHINESE FOOD AND LATKES

A Chinese food buffet and book signing with Rabbi Joshua Paul, author of “A Kosher Christmas,” are among the highlights. Sun. 4-6 p.m. $20. Wilshire Boulevard Temple, 11611 W. Olympic Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 445-1280. wbtla.org.

Calendar Picks and Clicks: June 30 – July 6, 2012


SAT | JUNE 30

“OY”

When Jewish sisters Selma and Jenny agree to discuss their Holocaust experiences with the younger generation of Osnabrück, the German city of their youth, they’re flooded by emotions and memories. Back home in Paris, the 80-something sisters open up about the anti-Semitism that colored their past as they cook in the kitchen together. Written by Helene Cixous and directed by Georges Bigot. Don’t miss tonight’s U.S. premiere. Sat. Through July 28. 7 p.m. $20 (general), $15 (students and seniors). Ivy Substation, 9070 Venice Blvd., Culver City. (310) 838-4264. theactorsgang.com.

JUSTICE BALL XVI

DJ Jermaine Dupri knows talent. The producer-songwriter-rapper behind hip-hop indie label So So Def has collaborated with Mariah Carey, Nelly, Da Brat and Bow Wow, among others. Tonight, Dupri spins for Bet Tzedek’s annual fundraiser, now in its 16th year. DJ Chris Kennedy, a regular on the club circuit, opens. Sat. 9 p.m. $100 (general), $175 (VIP). The BookBindery Building, 8870 Washington Blvd., Culver City. (323) 939-0506. thejusticeball.org.

SUN | JULY 1

“GEORGE GERSHWIN: FROM BROADWAY TO CATFISH ROW”

Experience American treasures from the Gershwin songbook at Grand Performances, featuring pianists Alan Chapman and Victoria Kirsch, sopranos Karen Benjamin and Shana Blake Hill, tenor Haqumai Waring Sharpe and bass-baritone Cedric Berry. Sun. 8 p.m. Free. California Plaza, 350 S. Grand Ave., downtown. (213) 687-2159. grandperformances.org.

MON | JULY 2

BARRY MANILOW

Fanilows rejoice! The pop singer-songwriter behind the hits “Mandy,” “Copacabana,” “Looks Like We Made It,” “I Write the Songs,” “Can’t Smile” and more performs at the Bowl. Surviving the constant changes of the music biz, he remains a strong force in the world of adult contemporary. Tonight, Manilow aims to please during this holiday spectacular. The program also features fireworks, the Los Angeles Philharmonic and conductor Sarah Hicks. Mon. Through July 4. 7:30 p.m. $13-$220. Hollywood Bowl, 2301 N. Highland Ave., Hollywood. (323) 850-2000. hollywoodbowl.com.

TUE | JULY 3

“GUSTAV KLIMT: THE MAGIC OF LINE”

The Getty retrospective showcases the Viennese master’s fascination with the human figure. Featuring more than 100 drawings by the artist, including some never exhibited before in North America, “The Magic of Line” traces Klimt’s evolution from early academic realism and historical subjects in the 1880s to his celebrated Modernist icons that broke new ground in the early 20th century. Tue. Free. Getty Center, 1200 Getty Center Drive, Los Angeles. (310) 440-7300. getty.edu.

SHOSHANA BEAN

The Broadway star (“Wicked,” “Hairspray”) and singer-songwriter appears in Los Feliz to perform songs from her second album, “The Offering.” Each ticket purchased comes with a signed copy of the upcoming album, due out in September. Tue. 9 p.m. $30-300. The Rockwell, 1714 N. Vermont Ave., Los Angeles. (323) 661-6163. showatbarre.com.

WED | JULY 4

INDEPENDENCE DAY BARBECUE

The folks at JConnectLA, The Chai Center and AMIT host a party with food, music and good times at a private residence in Beverly Hills. Young professionals (ages 21-39) only. ID required. Wed. 2-6 p.m. $13 (advance, until July 2), $18 (door). 602 N. Whittier Drive, Beverly Hills. (310) 391-7995. chaicenter.org/bbq.

THU | JULY 5

“ACROSS THE BLUE SEA”

An eclectic lineup of musicians, including the Yuval Ron Ensemble, vocalist Rabbi Hagai Batzri and Roma musicians Ferit Benli and Ali Durac, perform Israeli, Armenian, Greek and Turkish songs about the Mediterranean Sea during tonight’s concert. Israeli dancer Maya Karasso also performs. Presented by Mati. Thu. 8 p.m. $20 (advance), $30 (door). Temple Emanuel, 300 N. Clark Drive, Beverly Hills. (818) 612-8771. maticenter.com.

FRI | JULY 6

“TO ROME WITH LOVE”

Set in Italy, writer-director Woody Allen’s latest follows the stories of various people — some American, some Italian — and the romances, adventures and predicaments they get into. The ensemble cast includes Alec Baldwin as a writer revisiting the scenes of an old love; Jesse Eisenberg as a young man torn between his girlfriend (Greta Gerwig) and an aspiring actress (Ellen Page); Penelope Cruz as a woman of the streets; Roberto Benigni as an ordinary Roman contending with sudden fame; and Allen as an eccentric opera director who comes to Rome with his wife (Judy Davis). Fri. Various times. $11 (general), $8 (children under 12 and seniors). Laemmle’s Fallbrook 7, 6731 Fallbrook Ave., West Hills; Laemmle’s NoHo 7, 5240 Lankershim Blvd., North Hollywood; Laemmle’s Monica 4-Plex, 1332 Second St., Santa Monica. (310) 478-3836. laemmle.com.

Calendar Picks and Clicks: May 12-18, 2012


SAT | MAY 12

“OVERLOOKED SUSPECT”
What if O.J. Simpson didn’t do it? The Journal invites you to the L.A. premiere of a documentary that examines that very question. Explore the evidence with private investigator William Dear, whose ongoing investigation into the 1994 murders of Nicole Brown Simpson and Ron Goldman comes to a conclusion that has yet to be explored. A panel discussion and Q-and-A follow, featuring Dear, Deputy District Attorney Alan Jackson and criminal defense attorney James Blatt. Journal president and columnist David Suissa moderates. Must be at least 17 years old to attend. Sat. 7-10 p.m. $12. Saban Theatre, 8440 Wilshire Blvd., Beverly Hills. (800) 838-3006. http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/245443.

TUE | MAY 15

ERIK LARSON
The master of narrative nonfiction appears in conversation with David Kipen, founder of the Boyle Heights used bookshop Libros Schmibros. They discuss Larson’s bestseller, “In the Garden of Beasts: Love, Terror and an American Family in Hitler’s Berlin,” which follows U.S. Ambassador William Dodd, who arrives in Hitler’s Germany in 1933. Glamorous Germany soon reveals its true colors, but the State Department shows indifference to Dodd’s reports of Jewish persecution. Tue. 7:30 p.m. $20. Temple Emanuel of Beverly Hills, 300 N. Clark Drive, Beverly Hills. writersblocpresents.com.

ANDY COHEN
The out-and-proud executive at Bravo, who oversees development of shows like “Top Chef” and “The Real Housewives” franchise, discusses and signs copies of his new memoir, “Most Talkative: Stories From the Front Lines of Pop Culture,” which recounts how he became the first openly gay late-night talk show host, an Emmy winner and network head. Wristbanded event. Tue. 7 p.m. Free. Barnes and Nobles at The Grove, 189 Grove Drive, Suite K 30, Los Angeles. (323) 525-0270. barnesandnoble.com.

WED | MAY 16

SUISSA VS. BEINART
Journal president and columnist David Suissa debates Peter Beinart, author of the controversial book, “The Crisis of Zionism,” about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Temple Israel of Hollywood’s Rabbi John Rosove moderates the discussion on the lack of progress in peace talks — Beinart acknowledges acts of violence on the Palestinians’ part but faults Israeli policies; Suissa ascribes blame to the Palestinian Authority’s use of incitement against Jews. Wed. 7 p.m. Free. Temple Israel of Hollywood, 7300 Hollywood Blvd., Los Angeles. (323) 876-8330. tioh.org

“WAR ON WOMEN”
The National Council of Jewish Women holds an educational program advocating for reproductive freedom and addressing the current pushback against feminism. Actress and activist Tyne Daly (“Judging Amy”); American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) staff attorney Maggie Crosby; Serena Josel, public affairs director for Planned Parenthood Los Angeles; Linda Long, vice president of California National Organization for Women; and Kaya Masler, a USC student and political organizer, participate in a panel discussion. Los Angeles Times columnist Sandy Banks moderates. Light refreshments served. Wed. 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Free. NCJW/LA Council House, 543 N. Fairfax Ave., Los Angeles. RSVP (323) 852-8503. ncjwla.org.

“HATIKVA—A HYMN IS BORN”
Israeli musicologist and pianist Astrith Baltsan’s concert reveals the surprising origins of Israel’s national anthem, which has its roots in an ancient Sephardic prayer, classical music by Mozart, Chopin and Smetana, and a Romanian immigrant folk song. Presented by Mati and the Consulate General of Israel. Cocktail reception included. Wed. 7:30 p.m. (cocktails), 8:30 p.m. (program). $50 (advance), $60 (door). Temple Emanuel of Beverly Hills, 8844 Burton Way, Beverly Hills. (323) 351-7021. maticenter.org.

THU | MAY 17

“PROJECT MAH JONGG”
The new Skirball exhibition explores how a Chinese game became an American Jewish tradition, influencing fashion, style and cultural identity. Mah jongg-inspired contemporary works by Isaac Mizrahi, Bruce McCall and Maira Kalman accompany mah jongg sets and rulebooks, newspaper articles and vintage photographs. Visitors are encouraged to play at tables set up throughout the Skirball. Included with museum admission. Thu. Through Sept. 2. Noon-5 p.m. (Tuesday-Friday), 10 a.m.-5 p.m. (Saturday, Sunday). $10 (general), $7 (seniors, students), $5 (children, 2-12), free (members, children under 2). Skirball Cultural Center, 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 440-4500. skirball.org.

DAN RATHER AND MARTY KAPLAN
The veteran “CBS Evening News” anchor discusses his new memoir, “Rather Outspoken: My Life in News,” with Journal columnist Kaplan, the Norman Lear Professor of Entertainment, Media and Society at the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism. Thu. 7:30 p.m. $20. Writers Guild Theater, 135 S. Doheny Drive, Beverly Hills. writersblocpresents.com.

Calendar Picks and Clicks: August 31-September 9


PICK: WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 7

“THE MAD 7”

Unhappy office drone Elliot Green undergoes a transformation — into a lighter, freer, more realized version of himself — after meeting a blind man who sees, a deaf man who hears, a stutterer who’s a great orator along with four other strangers. Written by and starring New York playwright-performer Yehuda Hyman, the one-man secular comedy is a modern take on the “The Seven Beggars,” a folk tale by Rabbi Nachman of Breslov. A discussion with Hyman and a reception follow. Wed. 7 p.m. Free. Scene Dock Theatre, University of Southern California, downtown. Enter from Gate 6 (Vermont Avenue and 36th Street) or Gate 5 (Jefferson Boulevard at McClintock Avenue). (213) 740-0483. aicf.org.



WED | AUG 31

SOLEIL MOON FRYE
Star of the ’80s sitcom “Punky Brewster,” now a married mom of two and co-founder of the Larchmont Village kids clothing shop The Little Seed, signs copies of her new book, “Happy Chaos: From Punky to Parenting and My Perfectly Imperfect Adventures In Between.” Wed. 7 p.m. Free. Barnes & Noble, The Grove at Farmers Market, 189 Grove Drive, Los Angeles. (323) 525-0270. barnesandnoble.com.


SAT | SEPT 3

FYF FEST
L.A. band Fool’s Gold — led by Israeli-born musician Luke Top — indie-pop rock band Avi Buffalo and sibling comic duo the Sklar Brothers are among the dozens of musical artists and comedians performing at this Labor Day weekend festival. Sat. noon-midnight. $40-$99. Los Angeles State Historic Park, 1245 N. Spring St., downtown. (866) 777-8932. fyffest.com.


SUN | SEPT 4

S. MARK TAPER FOUNDATION AID AND RESCUE CENTER
Visit the Zimmer’s newest permanent exhibition. Explore a fire station, fire engine and a Zodiac Coast Guard rescue boat, which was used to save lives after Hurricane Katrina. Sun. 12:30-5 p.m. $8 (adults), $5 (children, 2-17), free (children, 2 and under). Zimmer Children’s Museum, 6505 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 101, Los Angeles. (323) 761-8984. zimmermuseum.org.


TUE | SEPT 6

VIDAL SASSOON
The man who has been on the cutting edge of hairstyling since the 1960s will present “Vidal Sassoon: The Movie,” which debuts today on DVD. The film recounts Sassoon’s seven years in a Sephardi orphanage, how he fought in the British anti-fascist brigade, 43 Group, served in Israel’s War of Independence and returned to London to start a career that would make him the most recognized hair-stylist on the planet. Tue. 7 p.m. Free. Barnes and Noble at Third Street Promenade, 1201 Third St., Santa Monica. (310) 260-9110. barnesandnoble.com.

PERLMAN AND BEETHOVEN
The iconic Israeli American violinist Itzhak Perlman leads the Los Angeles Philharmonic in performances of Beethoven’s “Two Romances,” “Symphony No. 8” and “Symphony No. 5” at the Hollywood Bowl. Tue. 8 p.m. $1.75-$140. 2301 N. Highland Ave., Hollywood. (323) 850-2000. hollywoodbowl.com.


WED | SEPT 7

AVI ISSACHAROFF
Haaretz’s Palestinian and Arab affairs correspondent discusses the Palestinian bid for recognition in the United Nations. Issacharoff addresses several pertinent questions, including, “What will happen the day after the U.N. vote?” “Will negotiations be possible, and if not, what will fill the vacuum?” and “How do we talk about the current moment and the process that led here?” Wed. 7-9 p.m. Free. Jewish Federation Valley Alliance, 22622 Vanowen St., West Hills. (818) 464-3200. jewishla.org.

LIMMUDLA@ANGEL CITY BREWING
Schmooze, enjoy a variety of craft beers — including brews named after Che Guevara and jazz greats Charlie Parker and Lester Young — and engage in a half-hour learning session with Limmudnik Marcus Freed, who discusses “When Is a Jew Not a Jew? Moving Beyond Boxes and Focusing on What’s Truly Important.” Thu. 7-11:30 p.m. Free (entry only, beer not included). Angel City Brewing, 216 S. Alameda St., downtown. (310) 499-1787. limmudla.org.


FRI | SEPT 9

SECOND ANNUAL SHABBAT AT THE BEACH BBQ
Celebrate Shabbat California-style: on the beach as the sun goes down, with barbecued food and good people. Organized by Reconstructionist synagogue Kehillat Israel, the synagogue recommends that attendees pre-order food by Sept. 6. For non-reserved attendees, there will be limited food and prices will be higher. Fri. 5 p.m. (festivities), 7 p.m. (service). $8 (hot dog meal), $10 (portobello mushroom burger meal), $10 (grilled chicken breast meal), $36 (family four-pack of any combination of the meals). Will Rogers State Beach, 15800 Pacific Coast Highway, Pacific Palisades. (310) 459-2328. kehillatisrael.org.

Your handy guide to performing at Jewish functions


MOCA’s latest exhibition reveals the early years of the ‘Feminist Revolution’


That women corporate executives are now indicted for malfeasance reminds me of the old Zionist litany that: “We won’t have a normal Jewish state until it includes gangsters and whores.”

If the glass ceiling hasn’t exactly been shattered, it does show a bit of leakage, although it’s still difficult to determine comfort levels about a woman being third in line for the presidency — or even a viable candidate.

Does this move toward egalitarianism now constitute a state of normalcy?

These are just some of the questions that make it worth contemplating the significance of the Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art’s bold look back at a pivotal period for women in art in “WACK! Art and the Feminist Revolution,” an exhibition that opens March 4 at The Geffen Contemporary and runs through July 16, 2007.

Women now make up about 30 percent of the membership of the Association of Art Museum Directors; that’s a huge difference from the early 1970s, when I first became a member and there were only a few women included.

Revisiting the once hot topic of feminism ought to be more than a nostalgic trip down memory lane, and the inclusiveness of MOCA’s exhibition — curated by former MOCA curator Connie Butler, currently at the Museum of Modern Art in New York — suggests a new level of seriousness that ought to be of special interest to Jewish viewers.

We, too, have seen a shift in the way Jews are viewed in the society.

We’re now a long way from the anti-Semitism of the 1930s and 1940s, when fears of “special pleading” kept many Jews from boldly protesting events in Europe that we subsequently came to call the Holocaust. But that doesn’t mean we should shun the topic of anti-Semitism, how it shaped the role of Jews in American society, and how it once gave us a special sensitivity to the plight of other groups subject to prejudice and indignity.

The MOCA exhibition “will highlight the crucial 15-year period between 1965 and 1980 during which feminism became a cultural force, and the discourse of feminism intersected with the practices of artists around the world.” This exhibition is not about a particular style, but about attitude and about artists positioning themselves in relation to the art world: As women, as feminists and, foremost, as artists. And that should make for an engaging experience of our perception of this art. And once again, Jewish analogies abound, since there has long been discussion about whether there is any such thing as Jewish art” or whether there are “Jewish artists.”

Regarding either Jewish or feminist art, we may ultimately be stuck with Justice Potter Stewart’s comment about pornography, “I know it when I see it.” And perhaps that will be the most valuable contribution of this exhibition.

Just as I have known artists who didn’t want to be seen in a Jewish context, fearing it might diminish some larger connotations of their work, I have known women artists who wouldn’t want to be shown in Washington’s Museum for Women in the Arts. Strange, since the artist never knows how she will be absorbed by the viewer.

Do we know what people are thinking when they look at Chagall’s painting of a Jew wearing tefillin at the Art Institute of Chicago?

Do people looking at the abstract color-field paintings of Helen Frankenthaler or the sculptures of Louise Nevelson — two women, artists, and Jews — make associations to specific gender or ethnic issues?

Probably not, since they are among the handful of successful women artists who overcame typecasting to make it to the mainstream prior to the advent of feminism, which may suggest why they are not included in this exhibition.

Using scholar Peggy Phelan’s definition, as stated in the show’s advance materials, that “feminism is the conviction that gender has been, and continues to be, a fundamental category for the organization of culture” and that “the pattern of that organization favors men over women,” the exhibition suggests an enormous diversity both in the range of work and in the range of attitudes about what feminism means to women artists (presumably men aren’t capable of expressing ideas about feminism in their work).

Again, Jewish analogies abound, since there is surely no Jewish style, but various Jews have expressed themselves Jewishly in their art, while others have emphatically eschewed such an approach. And what about artists embracing issues that don’t “belong” to them? For example, artists using the Holocaust or racism as a theme, even if they themselves have no personal relation to either issue.

As with any interesting and provocative exhibition, “WACK” promises to raise more questions than it likely will be able to answer. Which may well be all to the good, since we surely need thoughtful questions more than we need simplistic answers. Jewish viewers might approach this work by considering whether there’s any connection between feminism and Jewishness in the work of the many Jewish women in this exhibition (indeed, so many they can’t all be listed here).

Is it fair to suggest that in the 1970s Jews were still in the forefront of what might be thought liberal politics, and that this explains Jewish women embracing feminism? Or did Jewish women feel a special need for stridency, considering the long tradition of male domination in traditional Jewish religious practice. (Yes, I know, women have “special” obligations, such as lighting Shabbat candles; but let’s admit that the Jewish tradition has relegated women to the back of the bus. Indeed, even today’s gender-sensitive liturgies, citing the four so-called matriarchs, omit the two poor handmaidens who went through the pains of childbirth to help make that full dozen of Jacob’s boys!)

There’s no question that such issues inform the work of Chicago — one of feminist art’s most vocal and visible presences. But Jewish questions also enrich the work of Eleanor Antin, Mierle Laderman Ukeles and Hél?ne Aylon (the latter, strangely, missing from this show), and it will be worth pondering, in the presence of the work, in what way they do or don’t feel evident in the work of Eva Hesse, Miriam Schapiro and others.

‘Moishe Houses’ provide post-Hillel hangout for 20-somethings


Say you’re a few years out of college, living with friends and working in a low-paying job for some do-good organization. You don’t go to synagogue, but you miss the camaraderie of your college Hillel, and you like to invite people over for Shabbat meals.

Imagine if someone was willing to pay you to keep doing it?
 
That’s what’s offered by Moishe House, a fast-growing network of subsidized homes for 20-something Jews committed to building Jewish community for themselves and their peers.
The project was launched less than a year ago by The Forest Foundation, a Santa Barbara-based philanthropy. The foundation’s executive director, David Cygielman, 25, says the goal was to give young activist Jews the financial freedom to focus on creative programming designed to reach other young, unaffiliated Jews.

To the people living in these houses, it’s a terrific gift.
 
“We were already having Shabbat dinners three or four times a month and then they came along and said, ‘We’re looking for people doing what you’re doing. Keep it up, and we’ll support you,'” said Jonathan Herzog, 29, who lives in the Seattle house with his sister Norah and two friends.
 
The project is a validation of these young Jews’ efforts to create a Jewish home for an age group they feel gets lost in the communal shuffle.
 
“After college there’s no more Hillel, and they don’t join the Jewish community until they have families,” Cygielman noted.
 
The first Moishe House opened last December in San Francisco. Seattle was next in February, joined quickly by houses in Boston and Los Angeles.
 
New ones are to open in October in Oakland, Washington, Uruguay and Nigeria, and the plan is to have 12 houses up and running by next year.
 
Except for the Nigerian house, which is a one-man outreach operation, they all follow the same formula: Three or four Jews in their 20s receive a rent subsidy of up to $2,500 a month, along with $500 for programming, and are expected to become a communal hub for young Jews by hosting Shabbat meals, card games, Yiddish lessons, film nights, book discussions, neighborhood clean-ups and other social, intellectual and civic-minded activities.
 
Residents say the formula works because it lets young people organize events they themselves would want to attend, rather than having something imposed from above by a synagogue or JCC.
In many ways, it’s the bayit of the 21st century. But unlike those communal Jewish homes of the 1970s and ’80s, which usually were sponsored by Zionist youth groups, residents of Moishe Houses don’t subscribe to a particular ideology.
 
The focus varies according to residents’ interests: The houses in Seattle, Los Angeles and San Francisco host a lot of poker parties and film nights, while the Boston house is more involved in social action.
 
Houses have great freedom, Cygielman says, so long as they meet the minimum requirements: hosting eight to 12 events a month, making weekly reports, maintaining a Web site and reaching out to young people. Funding can be withdrawn if a house doesn’t perform.
 
“I won’t tell them what’s a wrong program or a right program,” Cygielman said. “I don’t care, so long as they’re building community and lots of people are coming.”
 
Maia Ipp, 24, moved into the San Francisco house in June. She runs a women’s group and a cooking club that is working its way alphabetically through the world’s cuisines.
 
Her parents once lived in a bayit sponsored by Habonim, a Labor Zionist youth group, but Ipp prefers the Moishe House model.
 
“We’re not affiliated with a movement that has a belief system, which frees us to do new, fresh work and engage young adults in ways other movements and campus groups can’t,” she said.
 
One recent evening, the four young residents of the San Francisco house got together for their weekly meeting. They sat around the large table in the dining room, which opens onto a large patio they use for Shabbat dinners and holiday parties.
 
David Persyko, 25, started hanging out at the house soon after it opened.
 
“I found myself really attached to being part of a Jewish community again,” he said. “Some of my fondest memories growing up were from Camp Swig, and coming here, I felt that rush of support I hadn’t felt in 10 years.”
 
He moved in in June and now runs poker night, which draws a group of guys every three weeks to “vent about the women in our lives,” Persyko said.
 
Aaron Gilbert, 24, runs a book club. The books aren’t Jewish, but the participants are, and talking about the books leads to talking about other things.
 
“It’s really intimate. We hang out, catch up on each others’ lives,” he said.
 
The house holds a big Shabbat dinner once a month and sponsors a softball team called the Matzah Ballstars. But the events and programs are secondary to the real draw.
 
“At our core, we’re four people who live in a house and we’re inviting people over. That’s appealing to people like us. It’s not institutional,” said Isaac Zones, 24, national director of the Moishe House network and a founding member of the San Francisco house.
 
On a table in the corner is a silver-toned bust of Zones’ grandfather, a man who founded his business empire with money he won playing poker. Zones makes sure the statue is always there during games.
 
The Moishe House concept is still in its early stages, and some things need to be tweaked. For example, the Los Angeles and Seattle houses are trying to beef up their social action component, while the Boston house is being encouraged to offer more “fun events,” Cygielman said.
 
It’s all part of figuring out what constitutes a Jewish community, or even a Jewish event. Must it be something devoted purely to a Jewish ritual or Zionist goal? Or is it enough to bring together a bunch of Jewish people to shmooze and eat?

Letters to the Editor


Rabbi Baron

Interesting that Rabbi David Baron said his invitation to Mel Gibson to speak at his temple on Yom Kippur was not a publicity stunt (“Three Groups Respond to Gibson’s Request for Meeting,” Aug. 11). Why then did I receive a form letter within two hours of sending the rabbi an e-mail expressing my aggravation at that very invitation? The form letter is addressed not to me, but “To Those Who Are Concerned About the Mel Gibson Invitation to Apologize.” Baron obviously hoped, and anticipated, that this handout to Gibson would bring a lot of attention; otherwise, why would he have had a form letter at the ready before there had yet been any response at all? And how was the invitation to Gibson made public in the first place? Baron wanted all the attention, which he got, without having to face the music, so he fled.

Jeff Weinstock
Encino

Ed Note: See Rabbi Baron’s op-ed column in this issue.

Star Power

Great article, but you may want to exercise a little more control over your cover art (“Star Power,” Aug. 26).

When did The Jewish Journal decide to “unilaterally” give back the West Bank and the Golan Heights?

It may be a subtle “mistake” in art direction, but the hash marks across the vibrant communities in the West Bank and the omission of the Golan are particularly insensitive as Israel continues its fight for it’s very existence. Recent events should have taught us all that the fight is not about “the territories.”

Hopefully your artist was being “creative” and not putting forth a political opinion that represents the editorial stance of The Jewish Journal.

Barry S. Weiss
Valley Village

RJC’s Israel Ads

I want to compliment the Republican Jewish Coalition (RJC) for their recent ads in The Jewish Journal (Aug. 18 and Aug. 25). The first correctly thanked President Bush for his stalwart support of Israel which was then under vicious attack by Iranian supplied Hezbollah terrorists.

The second pointed out that the Democratic Party has growing and influential leftist voices who not only rejected pro-Israel leader Sen. Joe Lieberman, but are increasingly hostile to bipartisan consensus in support of the Jewish state.Votes and polls do not lie. The vast majority of dissenters from congressional resolutions in support of Israel are Democrats. The majority of anti-Israel voices today on college campuses, in blogs and in our communities are left/liberal, not right/conservative. I have no doubt that American Jews will increasingly reward the GOP.

David Shacter
Los Angeles

The ad on your inside cover from The Republican Jewish Coalition disgusts me. Joe Lieberman was not defeated because of his support for Israel, but because of his continuing support of the most incompetent and corrupt president in the history of the United States.

Unfortunately, the Democratic Party supported Lieberman. It was the voting public, fed up with the disastrous war in Iraq and Lieberman’s blind support for it, that led to his defeat.

The “radical left” has hardly taken over the Democratic Party, and Cindy Sheehan is not a spokesperson for party policy.

No Democratic president would stand by and allow Hezbollah rockets to rain down on Haifa. Nor would they have started a war with Iraq that has ended up strengthening Iran and weakening both the United States and Israel.

Finally, it is the Republican Party that envisions the United States as a Christian theocracy. I cannot understand how any Jew could proudly align themselves with these people.

Barry Wendell
North Hollywood

Bill Boyarsky

I was at the event where Bill Boyarsky and David Lauter spoke for the Woman’s Alliance for Israel Program (“Needed: Rational Discussion,” Aug. 18). However, Boyarsky is incorrect in his assumptions about us going after Lauter’s scalp.We wanted much more from Lauter. We wanted an explanation on why the Los Angeles Times has difficulty in using the word terrorist, instead of “militant.” Instead of giving us a logical answer, he bored us with his explanation of the “one man’s freedom fighter is another man’s terrorist” jive, and that the L.A. Times assumes that its readers can discern the difference.

We booed because we are not the radical “right-wing” DEBKA readers, as Boyarsky implied. This was a slap in the face to any Republicans that were in the audience. We booed because we are not stupid. We expected an intellectual dialogue, but we were hit with criticisms of the Bush regime, a “not my president” attitude, and the moral explanation that because reporters put themselves in the line of fire they do a good job.

Well, my son is in the army in Israel; he puts himself in the line of fire, and he has no problems distinguishing between a terrorist and a freedom fighter. And to top it off, to make comments about FOX — the one channel that does not make excuses for suicide bombers — and assume this as our only source of information was a slap in the face to the many activists who work hard daily, educating, discussing, working and fighting for Israel. I am one of those people who was insulted by the attacks on the right, the convoluted answers and the lack of respect that Boyarsky gave us that night and in his column.

This is the reason why I find the L.A. Times irrelevant in their reporting. They refuse to listen to more than 400 subscribers and former subscribers, and the stats on their readership should be a wake-up call, not an excuse to use their political bias to win arguments.

Allyson Rowen Taylor
Associate Director
American Jewish Congress, Western Region

Israel P.R.

Are there any Jews in advertising? It’s a silly question, but given the pathetic state of Israeli public relations, one might wonder. Israel desperately needs a top-notch public relations campaign immediately, to reinforce the support of sympathetic Americans and win over those who are apathetic or ignorant regarding the Jewish state.

Remember the old ad campaign, “Come to Israel, come stay with friends…”? In those halcyon days, Israel just needed tourism; now, Israel needs renewed American commitment to its survival against the dedicated, dug-in Hezbollah and Hamas armies, who threaten its existence like a growing pack of wolves. America is Israel’s only reliable friend in the world, but it might not always be so.Most American Jews take Israel’s righteousness and survival for granted, but our stoic, fatal silence about Israeli greatness and appeal must end; Israel’s very survival may depend on it.

We know that Israel is the only multicultural nation in the Mideast, where all religions are respected (Muslims are elected to Parliament), where women are treated equally to men, and gays enjoy tolerance, but many Americans, and others, do not. Some great Jew, with the talent, influence and connections of, say, a Steven Spielberg or Rabbi Marvin Hier, or others of equal capability, must take the helm and reverse this public relations defeat.

Why is Hezbollah enjoying the laurels of victory for such a ruinous fiasco? Partially, it’s because they did win. Little Israel never before had to fight an army with such a death-wish commitment. What will happen when other young Arabs, anxious to die for their cause, join their ranks? How many rockets can Israeli cities endure before they become unlivable? The northern third of Israel is already a mess. But Hezbollah’s most important victory was in publicity. Israel has failed to make the case against Hezbollah tactics and for its own existence to America and the world! We must convince our fellow Americans that Hezbollah represents Arab terrorism and Israel is the front line against it. I would love to do it myself, and I’m anxious to be part of the team, but I’m just an anonymous high school teacher; all I can do is convince a person of stature to rise to the task now!

It will be a horrible irony if Israel loses in the court of public opinion, if Jews fail to make their case, the one field in which no one denies them proverbial brilliance. Some great Jew must pick up the phone, call the Israeli embassy, and offer their services to establish the team and organize the public relations effort. It is not hyperbole to suggest that this is a call of biblical proportion. All Jews know in their guts that young Israel is existentially threatened like never before.

The great Persian Empire has risen up and told the world its plan. We must rally our fellow Americans now.

We need a leader.

Rueben Gordon
North Hollywood

Truth in Media

Josef Goebbels, Nazi minister of information, astutely observed that, if you tell a big enough lie, long enough, people will believe it — for no alternative report is provided. American news media daily bombard us with the nonexistent expertise of journalists and consultants — who concur with the media’s editorial position. They state that it is the very existence of Israel and/or U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East that is the source of Islamist animus to the west. Rudimentary knowledge of history readily dispels such tripe.

The first U.S. interaction with Islamists occurred in 1805, when President Thomas Jefferson dispatched troops to Morocco to stop Barbary Pirate attacks on Americans (“The Pirate Coast” by Richard Zacks, 2006).

The Islamic Brotherhood, founded in 1928 in Egypt by Hassa al-Banna, espouses global Muslim conquest, supports violence against civilians and is the philosophical father of Osama bin Laden and al-Qaeda.

This reality long pre-dates the existence of Israel or modern-day U.S. policy in the Middle East, but you will never learn that from our news media. Certainly the media can be a valuable check against the tyranny of the government, but who will protect us from the tyranny of the press?

Fred Korr
Los Angeles

THE JEWISH JOURNAL welcomes letters from all readers. Letters should be no more than 200 words and must include a valid name, address and phone number. Letters sent via e-mail must not contain attachments. Pseudonyms and initials will not be used, but names will be withheld on request. We reserve the right to edit all letters. Mail: The Jewish Journal, Letters, 3580 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 1510, Los Angeles, CA 90010; e-mail: letters@jewishjournal.com; or fax: (213) 368-1684

Jewish Journal September 1, 2006