A New York City Police Department security camera hanging across the street from Trump Tower on March 7. Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Meet Ezra Cohen-Watnick, the NSC aide who reportedly leaked intel to back Trump tapping claims


Ezra Cohen-Watnick has been in the spotlight recently following reports that he was the aide behind a White House leak to help back up President Donald Trump’s claim that Barack Obama had wiretapped him.

The New York Times reported last month that the Jewish senior director for intelligence on the National Security Council was one of two White House aides who leaked the information to Rep. Devin Nunes, R-Calif., the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee. The White House apparently hoped the intel, which suggested Trump campaign officials were incidentally swept up in foreign surveillance by American spy agencies, would vindicate Trump’s claim that Obama had eavesdropped on him. The Times article followed a Politico report that Trump had overruled a decision by his national security adviser, Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster,  in order to keep Cohen-Watnick in his current position.

Trump made the wiretapping claim, without citing evidence, on Twitter earlier last month. Intelligence and law enforcement officials, along with Democratic and Republican lawmakers, responded by saying there was no evidence to show that Obama had wiretapped Trump.

According to the Times, Cohen-Watnick started to review highly classified information after Trump posted his tweet in a bid to substantiate it. He and a colleague, Michael Ellis – formerly a staffer on the House Intelligence Committee – then contacted Nunes, who was on Trump’s transition team.

A Newsweek article published Thursday looked at Cohen-Watnick’s rise in the White House. Here are some of the interesting findings from that article as well as other recent reports.

Cohen-Watnick was involved in Republican groups from an early age.

Though Cohen-Watnick grew up in the liberal neighborhood of Chevy Chase, Md., he seems to have developed conservative political beliefs at an early age. In high school, he joined the Young Republicans Club, and during his studies at the University of Pennsylvania, he was a member of the Union League of Philadelphia, which a pro-Trump columnist for Philly.com described as the city’s “iconic bastion of GOP conservatism.” Cohen-Watnick also joined a Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps course, although he later dropped out.

Some of his family friends were bothered by his “growing anti-Muslim fervor.”

As a student at the University of Pennsylvania, Cohen-Watnick helped plan a “Terrorism Awareness Week,” originally named “Islamo-Fascism Awareness Week” together with the conservative writer David Horowitz. Such “awareness week” events on other campuses, also sponsored by Horowitz, have promoted “anti-Muslim views” and featured “events with anti-Muslim activists,” according to a 2013 report by the Anti-Defamation League. Some of Cohen-Watnick’s progressive family friends “were disturbed by his growing anti-Muslim fervor, especially when they heard him express sympathy for illegal Israeli settlements and other hard-line views. Another family friend tried to persuade the young man that the Middle East was far more complicated than he thought,” according to Newsweek.

His service at the Defense Intelligence Agency was less-than-stellar, according to classmates.

Cohen-Watnick didn’t earn high praises from those DIA training program classmates who spoke to Newsweek. One source said his reputation“was poor. He was allegedly not a team player and would also ‘leak’ denigrating information about his fellow trainees” to their instructors. “While we expect each student to do their own work,” the source adds, “we also demand they develop positive and healthy partnering skills.” After a training program in Virginia, Cohen-Watnick was assigned to serve in Afghanistan. Cohen-Watnick did apparently manage to impress one important person: Gen. Michael Flynn, Trump’s former national security adviser who resigned in February after acknowledging that he had misled other administration officials, including Vice President Mike Pence, about a phone call he had with the Russian ambassador before Trump assumed office.

Cohen-Watnick and Flynn were also connected through Frank Gaffney, the founder and president of a think tank that promulgates the theory that the Muslim Brotherhood has established a “Sharia-supremacist infrastructure” in the United States in the form of mosques, cultural centers and Muslim organizations. His daughter and Cohen-Watnick were close in high school, according to Newsweek. Gaffney reportedly offered Cohen-Watnick an internship at his think tank, the Center for Security Policy, although he told Newsweek that he had not spoken to Cohen-Watnick since he was in high school. Flynn, a friend of Gaffney, later brought Cohen-Watnick to the NSC.

Cohen-Watnick’s wife did PR work for Russia.

At the D.C.-office for the PR firm Ketchum, Rebecca Miller worked with Russia. In a 2014 interview brought to light last month by Los Angeles-based lawyer and genealogist E. Randol Schoenberg, Miller’s mother said her daughter was “responsible for providing PR and marketing to try to make Russia look better.” A Ketchum representative told Newsweek that Miller stopped working on the Russia account in 2012, but the revelations of her work may raise alarm bells due to Cohen-Watnick’s ties to Flynn, whose failure to disclose a conversation with a Russian ambassador led to his resignation. Newsweek found little other information about Cohen-Watnick and Miller’s relationship. A synagogue newsletter for Ohr Kodesh Congregation, a Conservative synagogue outside Washington, D.C.,  listed the two as having celebrated their engagement in November.

White House aide Ezra Cohen-Watnick reportedly leaked sensitive information to House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence Chairman Representative Devin Nunes (R-Calif.), above. Cohen-Watnick's wife worked on behalf of Russia. Photo by Jonathan Ernst/Reuters

Wife of key Trump aide worked to make Putin’s Russia look good in the West 


In the rush to connect the dots between the Trump Administration and Russian President Vladimir Putin, a Jewish wedding provided the latest purported link.

Specifically, it’s the Jewish wedding of Ezra Cohen-Watnick, the White House aide whom the New York Times identified as having leaked sensitive intelligence to a high-ranking Republican congressman in March. New information suggests Cohen-Watnick’s wife worked on behalf of the Russian government as a Washington D.C-based public relations specialist before they married.

In November, the 30-year-old Trump aide celebrated his upcoming wedding with Rebecca Miller, a content executive at the multinational public-relations firm Ketchum, which was retained until 2015 by the Russian government. While at Ketchum, Miller reportedly worked to “make Russia look better.”

The information comes from an oral history interview of Miller’s mother, Vicki Fraser, by the State Historical Society of Missouri in August 2014 (Fraser was born in St. Louis).

“Her big challenges right now are Ketchum is responsible for providing PR and marketing to try to make Russia look better,” Fraser told the interviewer of her daughter, “which is particularly difficult when they’re invading other countries and when Putin is somewhat out of control.”

The interview was discovered by E. Randol Schoenberg, a Los Angeles-based attorney and genealogy who made a name and fortune by recovering some $300 million worth of paintings pilfered by Nazis in Vienna in a landmark case in 2006.

On his blog, Schoenberg wrote that he and a fellow genealogist managed to uncover family details about Cohen-Watnick that led to the find.

Cohen-Watnick, the National Security Council senior director for intelligence, reportedly provided California Congressman Devin Nunes, chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, with information suggesting President Donald Trump was swept up in surveillance by American intelligence agencies.

The leak is particularly significant because it led to a breakdown in the intelligence committee’s investigation of ties between Trump associates and Russia. In addition, after the source of the leak was revealed, National Security Advisor Lt. Gen. H. R. McMaster reportedly sought the aide’s firing, but Trump intervened personally to save Cohen-Watnick’s job.

Ohr Kodesh Congregation, a Conservative synagogue outside Washington D.C., announced Cohen-Watnick and Miller’s aufruf, the Shabbat celebration that precedes an observant wedding, in November.

Jared Kushner, senior White House adviser, in the Roosevelt Room of the White House, Feb. 7, 2017. Photo by Andrew Harrer/Pool/Getty Images.

Senate committee to question Jared Kushner over Russia ties


The Senate Intelligence Committee will question Jared Kushner, President Donald Trump’s son-in-law and an adviser, over his ties to Russian officials.

The committee is looking into meetings that Kushner had with Russia’s ambassador to the U.S., Sergey Kislyak, in December during the transition at Trump Tower in New York. The meetings included Michael Flynn, who stepped down as Trump’s national security adviser over his contacts with Russian officials, including Kislyak, The New York Times reported, citing unnamed government officials. Kushner reportedly also arranged a second meeting between Flynn and Kislyak.

Kushner also will face questioning about an unreported meeting he had with the head of a Russian state-owned bank that was under sanctions enacted by the Obama administration over Russia’s annexation of Crimea.

White House spokesman Hope Hicks confirmed the meetings to The New York Times.

Hicks also told the newspaper that Kushner was willing to talk to the committee about the meetings, saying, “He isn’t trying to hide anything.”

The arranging of the meeting with the Russian banker came at the same time that American intelligence determined that Russian spies ordered by President Vladimir Putin had attempted to sway the U.S. election in favor of Trump, the newspaper reported.

Kushner is the person closest to the president to be questioned in the investigations and the only one currently serving in the White House, according to the Times.

Committee chair Sen. Richard Burr, R-N.C., and Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va., the committee’s vice chairman, said in a statement that “Mr. Kushner has volunteered to be interviewed as part of the committee’s investigation into the Russian activities surrounding the 2016 election.”

Meanwhile, the White House announced Sunday night, after a report appeared in the Washington Post, that Kushner would lead a new White House office that would streamline the government, using ideas borrowed from the business world.

The White House Office of Innovation is being given the authority to overhaul government bureaucracy. The initiative was to be formally announced on Monday.

“All Americans, regardless of their political views, can recognize that government stagnation has hindered our ability to properly function, often creating widespread congestion and leading to cost overruns and delays,” read a statement issued by the White House on Sunday in Trump’s name. “I promised the American people I would produce results, and apply my  ‘ahead of schedule, under budget’ mentality to the government.”

Kushner, who is Jewish, told the Washington Post on Sunday: “The government should be run like a great American company. Our hope is that we can achieve successes and efficiencies for our customers, who are the citizens.”

Former Jewish lawmakers urge backing for Iran nuclear deal


Jane Harman, a former Jewish lawmaker who once was the top Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, was among 75 ex-Congress members who signed a letter urging their sitting colleagues to support the Iran nuclear deal.

“We know of no viable alternatives to the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action that is now before you,” said the letter organized by the Win Without War group posted Monday. “We agree that no deal is better than a bad deal. But we also agree that a good deal is better than no deal.”

Seventy-one of the signatories are Democrats.

Seven of the signatories were among the 11 former Jewish members of Congress, all Democrats, who signed a letter appearing Aug. 27 in The New York Times expressing support for the sanctions relief for nuclear restrictions deal reached July 14 between Iran and the major powers. They also urged sitting lawmakers not to disapprove of the agreement.

Among the signatories were former members of the party leadership, including Sen. Carl Levin of Michigan, for years the top Democrat on the Senate’s Armed Services Committee, and Rep. Barney Frank of Massachusetts, a one-time chairman of the U.S. House of Representatives Banking Committee.

Congress has until late September to decide whether to exercise its right to kill the deal.

Most Republicans oppose the deal, and opponents and backers of the deal are focusing on undecided Democrats.

President Barack Obama is leading efforts to keep Congress from killing the deal. Leading opposition to the deal, in addition to Republicans, are Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and the American Israel Public Affairs Committee.

Much of the focus has been on the 27 Jewish lawmakers caucusing with Democrats in both chambers. Of these, six have said they will oppose the deal, 13 say they support it and eight are undecided.

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