British Jewish cemetery is vandalized


Gravestones in a Jewish cemetery in England were painted with swastikas and anti-Semitic graffiti, and some were toppled.

The vandalism in Manchester was discovered Monday; it is believed the attack occurred on Sunday or early Monday. A similar attack occurred earlier this month, according to the Manchester Evening News.

Inspector Mike Reid of the Greater Manchester Police told the newspaper that the incident is being treated as a hate crime and comes with stiffer punishments when the vandals are caught.

“The vandalism of a gravestone is, in itself, a sickening act, but to violate the memory of those resting in the cemetery still further by daubing racial slurs on the graves is truly repulsive,” Reid said.

Extra security patrols have been added in the area, according to police.

Polish home, about to be razed, found to have used Jewish gravestones


Seven Jewish gravestones were discovered to have been used in the construction of a home in Poland.

The gravestones were used to build the ceiling of the basement of a home in Golina, TV Konin reported.

It is believed that the headstones came from the destroyed Jewish cemetery in the town. No gravestones remain in the cemetery, according to the report.

The disused home, which was about to be destroyed, was constructed during or after World War II.

The gravestones, which are etched in Hebrew and in good condition, were discovered late last month by local historian Krzysztof Grochowski, who had decided to photograph the building before it was torn down, according to the Virtual Shtetl website. The stones became visible when plasterwork covering the ceiling was removed.

The headstones will be included in a museum exhibit or be used to create a memorial at the site of the former Golina cemetery, the local monuments preservation office told the television station.

Jewish cemetery unearthed during construction work in Turkey


Gravestones and bones from an ancient Turkish Jewish cemetery were unearthed during the construction of an underground tunnel.

The remains in the Turkish city of Izmir were found more than 20 feet below ground, the Hurriyet Daily News reported Wednesday.

According to Hurriyet, the gravestones were left in the ground and the bones were delivered to representatives of Izmir's Jewish community.

The bones will be reburied in the Altındag Jewish Cemetery, which remains open to Jewish burials, Izmir Jewish community chairman Jak Kaya told Hurriyet.

The cemetery disturbed by the construction work served the Jewish community during the 19th century, Kaya told Hurriyet.

In a letter to Turkey's Culture Ministry, the Jewish community requested permission for the removal and transfer of the gravestones, according to Hurriyet.

Izmir was home to approximately 40,000 Jews in 1868, making it the third largest Jewish community in the Ottoman Empire after Salonika and Istanbul, according to Beit Hatfutsot: The Museum of the Jewish People. There are now about 2,400 Jews in Izmir.

Ukrainian city agrees to stop using Jewish headstones as pavement


The city of Lviv in Ukraine agreed to remove Jewish headstones currently used as pavement.

The grave markers, from cemeteries destroyed by the Nazis during their occupation of Ukraine in the 1940s, will be moved to the only cemetery that was not destroyed during the Holocaust, according to Sprirt24, a Netherlands-based news agency.

The Soviet Red Army, which moved in on the heels of the retreating Nazi army, used the headstones as pavement, according to Meylakh Sheykhet, Ukraine’s representative in the Union of Councils for Jews in the former Soviet Union, who has lobbied for the headstones' removal for years.

He told Spririt24 that the local market was built by the Soviet authorities in 1947 from Jewish headstones, which were placed horizontally and covered with asphalt.

Viktor Zaharchuk, a local resident, showed the Spirit24 film crew some headstones with Hebrew writings that were directly placed on the ground as pavement.

The city was considering several designs for a monument at Lviv’s the only remaining Jewish cemetery, Spirit24 reported, though it is unclear whether that monument would incorporate the headstones after they are removed.