F-16 engines appear stolen from IDF base


Several engines of F-16 fighter jets appear to have been stolen from an Israel Air Force base, the Israel Defense Forces said.

The IDF spokesperson unit told Army Radio on Friday that the Military Police’s serious crimes unit launched an investigation into the possibility that the engines had been stolen.

The Hebrew-language news site Walla reported on Thursday that the engines — which weigh over 1.5 tons and are more than 15 feet long — were stolen in recent days from an unspecified military base.

Arutz Sheva, a radio sation, reported that “senior sources” in the Israel Air Force said the theft appeared to be an inside job as the base’s perimeter fence had not been breeched.

This lead investigators to believe that the thieves went in and out through the gates using large vehicles. The parts were slated to be repaired.

Arutz Sheva reports that most likely the engines were stolen by metal thieves.

In July, Bedouin metal thieves infiltrated the IDF base at Tze’elim in the Negev and stole crates of ammunition, which the IDF said were empty. The Bedouins entered the base in SUVs.

An army source called the incident “grave” and said it was the first of its kind, the Times of Israel reported.

New Turkish ID system will allow attacks on Israeli targets


A new identification system will allow Turkish fighter jets to fire on Israeli targets.

The Identification Friend or Foe system is set to be put on all Turkish fighter jets, which are U.S.-made F-16 fighter jets, Turkish media reported Tuesday.

The new identification system replaces a U.S. system which automatically identified all Israeli targets as friend, and prevented Turkish pilots from firing, according to reports.

The new Turkish-made system will be mounted on all Turkish fighter jets and naval vessels in the near future, according to reports.

The announcement comes amid increased tension between Israel and Turkey, including a declaration by Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyep Erdogan that the country will strengthen its presence in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea and that Turkish warships will accompany aid vessels bringing cargo to the Gaza Strip.

On Monday, Erdogan said in an interview with Al-Jazeera that a raid by Israel naval commandos on an aid flotilla to Gaza in which nine Turkish nationals were killed was “cause for war” but that Turkey had exercised “patience,” and did not retaliate.

“It is a cause for war, but we decided to act in line with Turkey’s grandeur and showed patience,” Erdogan said before leaving for a visit to Egypt.