Calendar: January 20-26


FRI | JAN 20

SHABBAT TRIBUTE TO MLK

Celebrate the life and legacy of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. at Kol Tikvah, with Rabbi Jon Hanish and Cantor Noa Shaashua. Special guests Dr. Dee and the Sacred Praise Chorale, one of Los Angeles’ premier gospel choirs, will also be featured. Everyone is welcome to attend this soulful event. Followed by socializing, sweet treats and coffee. 6:30 p.m. Free. Kol Tikvah, 20400 Ventura Blvd., Woodland Hills. (818)348-0670. koltikvah.org.

SHISHI ISRAELI

Bring family and friends for a Shishi Israeli celebration at the IAC Shepher Community Center, which has undergone a major renovation. There will be a kosher dinner, activities and live music. 6:30 p.m. $21 for adults; $13 for children. IAC Shepher Community Center, 6530 Winnetka Ave., Woodland Hills. israeliamerican.org.

SAT | JAN 21

WOMEN’S MARCH

If you support human rights, tolerance and compassion for humanity, join in this diverse event, which will start at Pershing Square (532 S. Olive St.) and end at City Hall (200 N. Spring St., Los Angeles). 9 a.m. Free. Downtown Los Angeles. (310) 200-0124. womensmarchla.org.

“NOURISHING TRADITION”

Gain insight into how Jewish artists think about food, home and traditions at the new exhibit “Nourishing Tradition.” It will feature paintings and sculptural assemblies by artists including Judy Dekel, Harriete Estel Berman, Betty Green, Harriet Glaser, Benny Ferdman, Marleene Rubenstein, Marilee Tolwin and Penny Wolin. The evening includes a reception and an artist talk. 6:30 p.m. reception; 7 p.m. artist talk. Free. Through March 5. The Braid, 2912 Colorado Ave., No. 102, Santa Monica. (310) 315-1400. jewishwomenstheatre.org.

“THE MATZO BALL DIARIES”

In “The Matzo Ball Diaries,” 15 professional and amateur writers reveal funny and poignant moments about the power of food. A boy decides to give up certain Jewish foods in order to lose weight, but will he lose his religion after he loses weight? Another man begins a food franchise only to realize the impact he has had on Americans. These and other moving stories will be presented at a variety of venues. 8 p.m. $40. The Braid, 2912 Colorado Ave., No. 102, Santa Monica. Additional shows presented at synagogues throughout Los Angeles. (310) 315-1400. jewishwomenstheatre.org.

SUN | JAN 22

“CHAMPIONING CIVIL RIGHTS & RESISTING INJUSTICE”

The late Rabbi Joachim Prinz and composer Kurt Weill were German-Jewish emigres who fled Nazi Germany for the United States. This symposium will put the lives and works of these two men in conversation. Their shared historical foundation for social justice will be explored as well as each individual’s contribution to the world. The event is part of the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra’s “Lift Every Voice” festival. Followed by a concert in Royce Hall. 9:30 a.m. Free. UCLA, 314 Royce Hall, Los Angeles. (310) 267-5327. cjs.ucla.edu.

RUNNING CLUSTER

Join Young Adults of Los Angeles’ Running Cluster for a four-mile run up Sunset Boulevard, past the outskirts of Bel Air and through the heart of Westwood. Meet afterward at Nekter Juice Bar (10912 Lindbrook Drive, Westwood Village) for a juice or bite to eat. 9:30 a.m. Free. UCLA, 10899 Le Conte Ave., Los Angeles. (323) 761-8000. yala.org.

“LARRY BELL: PACIFIC RED”

The Frederick R. Weisman Museum of Art at Pepperdine University presents “Larry Bell: Pacific Red.” There will be a reception to meet Bell, who was a founder of the California Light and Space movement in the 1960s. He has pushed the boundaries of perception and technology in his mission to explore light and vision. “Pacific Red” features a historical survey of his art from the 1950s and ’60s as well as a new installation designed for the galleries at the Weisman Museum of Art. 2 p.m. Free. Through April 2. Pepperdine University, 24255 Pacific Coast Highway, Malibu. (310) 506-4851. arts.pepperdine.edu/museum.

ANNIE KORZEN WITH FRITZ COLEMAN

Annie Korzen returns to the stage with longtime Southern California weathercaster Fritz Coleman. Korzen will do a short set before introducing Coleman. After the performance, Korzen will sit down with Coleman to discuss his background, experiences and passions. The audience is encouraged to ask questions. 5 p.m. $25. American Jewish University, Familian Campus, 15600 Mulholland Drive, Los Angeles. (310) 440-1572. wcce.aju.edu.

“ANI YERUSHALMI”

“Ani Yerushalmi” is an original musical from Israel, featuring Yehoram Gaon, one of Israel’s most prominent and iconic actors and singers. The musical tells the story of Gaon’s childhood in Jerusalem and the events that led to the reunification of the city in 1967. 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $60. Broad Stage, 1310 11th St., Santa Monica. (818) 456-8527. maticenter.com.

TUES | JAN 24

“THINK DIFFERENT” WITH AMIT KLEINBERGER

 

JNET Woodland Hills presents Amit Kleinberger, CEO of Menchie’s Frozen Yogurt, which has become the fastest-growing food franchise in the United States and the largest frozen yogurt franchise in the world. Kleinberger, who served in the Israel Defense Forces, will discuss the keys to his business success. 6 p.m. Free. RSVP at eventbrite.com. Temple Aliyah, 6025 Valley Circle Blvd., Los Angeles. jnetonline.org.

KLEZMER: A LIVE MUSICAL REVIVAL

JDC Entwine presents a klezmer concert and exploration of Jewish identity through music. Learn how young Jews are putting a modern spin on traditional Jewish music. There will be a live performance by Orchestra Euphonos and an exclusive screening of a short film featuring Zhenya Lopatnik, a leading voice in the Yiddish-language music scene. Complimentary drinks. 21-and-older event. 7 p.m. $15. Tickets available at eventbrite.com. The Record Parlour, 6408 Selma Ave., Los Angeles. jdcentwine.org.

THURS | JAN 26

“JEWISH IDENTITY IN QUESTION: THE LEGACY OF IRENE NEMIROVSKY”

Susan Rubin Suleiman, a research professor at Harvard University, will discuss Jewish identity in the life and work of Irene Nemirovsky. Nemirovsky was an accomplished novelist during the 1930s but was deported from France because she was a Russian Jew, and she died in Auschwitz. Many believed Nemirovsky to be anti-Semitic because of her portrayal of Jews in her novels. Nemirovsky’s story reflects many assimilated Jews in Europe who had abandoned Jewish religious practice but were still persecuted by the Nazis. 4 p.m. Free. UCLA Faculty Center, 480 Charles E. Young Drive East, Los Angeles. (310) 267-5327. cjs.ucla.edu.

Calendar: January 20-26


FRI | JAN 20

SHABBAT TRIBUTE TO MLK

Celebrate the life and legacy of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. at Kol Tikvah, with Rabbi Jon Hanish and Cantor Noa Shaashua. Special guests Dr. Dee and the Sacred Praise Chorale, one of Los Angeles’ premier gospel choirs, will also be featured. Everyone is welcome to attend this soulful event. Followed by socializing, sweet treats and coffee. 6:30 p.m. Free. Kol Tikvah, 20400 Ventura Blvd., Woodland Hills. (818)348-0670. koltikvah.org.

SHISHI ISRAELI

Bring family and friends for a Shishi Israeli celebration at the IAC Shepher Community Center, which has undergone a major renovation. There will be a kosher dinner, activities and live music. 6:30 p.m. $21 for adults; $13 for children. IAC Shepher Community Center, 6530 Winnetka Ave., Woodland Hills. israeliamerican.org.

SAT | JAN 21

WOMEN’S MARCH

If you support human rights, tolerance and compassion for humanity, join in this diverse event, which will start at Pershing Square (532 S. Olive St.) and end at City Hall (200 N. Spring St., Los Angeles). 9 a.m. Free. Downtown Los Angeles. (310) 200-0124. womensmarchla.org.

“NOURISHING TRADITION”

Gain insight into how Jewish artists think about food, home and traditions at the new exhibit “Nourishing Tradition.” It will feature paintings and sculptural assemblies by artists including Judy Dekel, Harriete Estel Berman, Betty Green, Harriet Glaser, Benny Ferdman, Marleene Rubenstein, Marilee Tolwin and Penny Wolin. The evening includes a reception and an artist talk. 6:30 p.m. reception; 7 p.m. artist talk. Free. Through March 5. The Braid, 2912 Colorado Ave., No. 102, Santa Monica. (310) 315-1400. jewishwomenstheatre.org.

“THE MATZO BALL DIARIES”

In “The Matzo Ball Diaries,” 15 professional and amateur writers reveal funny and poignant moments about the power of food. A boy decides to give up certain Jewish foods in order to lose weight, but will he lose his religion after he loses weight? Another man begins a food franchise only to realize the impact he has had on Americans. These and other moving stories will be presented at a variety of venues. 8 p.m. $40. The Braid, 2912 Colorado Ave., No. 102, Santa Monica. Additional shows presented at synagogues throughout Los Angeles. (310) 315-1400. jewishwomenstheatre.org.

SUN | JAN 22

“CHAMPIONING CIVIL RIGHTS & RESISTING INJUSTICE”

The late Rabbi Joachim Prinz and composer Kurt Weill were German-Jewish emigres who fled Nazi Germany for the United States. This symposium will put the lives and works of these two men in conversation. Their shared historical foundation for social justice will be explored as well as each individual’s contribution to the world. The event is part of the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra’s “Lift Every Voice” festival. Followed by a concert in Royce Hall. 9:30 a.m. Free. UCLA, 314 Royce Hall, Los Angeles. (310) 267-5327. cjs.ucla.edu.

RUNNING CLUSTER

Join Young Adults of Los Angeles’ Running Cluster for a four-mile run up Sunset Boulevard, past the outskirts of Bel Air and through the heart of Westwood. Meet afterward at Nekter Juice Bar (10912 Lindbrook Drive, Westwood Village) for a juice or bite to eat. 9:30 a.m. Free. UCLA, 10899 Le Conte Ave., Los Angeles. (323) 761-8000. yala.org.

“LARRY BELL: PACIFIC RED”

The Frederick R. Weisman Museum of Art at Pepperdine University presents “Larry Bell: Pacific Red.” There will be a reception to meet Bell, who was a founder of the California Light and Space movement in the 1960s. He has pushed the boundaries of perception and technology in his mission to explore light and vision. “Pacific Red” features a historical survey of his art from the 1950s and ’60s as well as a new installation designed for the galleries at the Weisman Museum of Art. 2 p.m. Free. Through April 2. Pepperdine University, 24255 Pacific Coast Highway, Malibu. (310) 506-4851. arts.pepperdine.edu/museum.

ANNIE KORZEN WITH FRITZ COLEMAN

Annie Korzen returns to the stage with longtime Southern California weathercaster Fritz Coleman. Korzen will do a short set before introducing Coleman. After the performance, Korzen will sit down with Coleman to discuss his background, experiences and passions. The audience is encouraged to ask questions. 5 p.m. $25. American Jewish University, Familian Campus, 15600 Mulholland Drive, Los Angeles. (310) 440-1572. wcce.aju.edu.

“ANI YERUSHALMI”

“Ani Yerushalmi” is an original musical from Israel, featuring Yehoram Gaon, one of Israel’s most prominent and iconic actors and singers. The musical tells the story of Gaon’s childhood in Jerusalem and the events that led to the reunification of the city in 1967. 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $60. Broad Stage, 1310 11th St., Santa Monica. (818) 456-8527. maticenter.com.

TUES | JAN 24

“THINK DIFFERENT” WITH AMIT KLEINBERGER

 

JNET Woodland Hills presents Amit Kleinberger, CEO of Menchie’s Frozen Yogurt, which has become the fastest-growing food franchise in the United States and the largest frozen yogurt franchise in the world. Kleinberger, who served in the Israel Defense Forces, will discuss the keys to his business success. 6 p.m. Free. RSVP at eventbrite.com. Temple Aliyah, 6025 Valley Circle Blvd., Los Angeles. jnetonline.org.

KLEZMER: A LIVE MUSICAL REVIVAL

JDC Entwine presents a klezmer concert and exploration of Jewish identity through music. Learn how young Jews are putting a modern spin on traditional Jewish music. There will be a live performance by Orchestra Euphonos and an exclusive screening of a short film featuring Zhenya Lopatnik, a leading voice in the Yiddish-language music scene. Complimentary drinks. 21-and-older event. 7 p.m. $15. Tickets available at eventbrite.com. The Record Parlour, 6408 Selma Ave., Los Angeles. jdcentwine.org.

THURS | JAN 26

“JEWISH IDENTITY IN QUESTION: THE LEGACY OF IRENE NEMIROVSKY”

Susan Rubin Suleiman, a research professor at Harvard University, will discuss Jewish identity in the life and work of Irene Nemirovsky. Nemirovsky was an accomplished novelist during the 1930s but was deported from France because she was a Russian Jew, and she died in Auschwitz. Many believed Nemirovsky to be anti-Semitic because of her portrayal of Jews in her novels. Nemirovsky’s story reflects many assimilated Jews in Europe who had abandoned Jewish religious practice but were still persecuted by the Nazis. 4 p.m. Free. UCLA Faculty Center, 480 Charles E. Young Drive East, Los Angeles. (310) 267-5327. cjs.ucla.edu.

8 things for Jews to do at Christmastime


SAT | DEC 24

“FIDDLER ON THE ROOF” SING-A-LONG

All fans are invited to screenings of the classic musical film “Fiddler on the Roof.” With audi- ence participation, movie trivia and guest hosts, it’s sure to be a memorable evening. Sing along to “Sunrise, Sunset,” “If I Were a Rich Man,” “To Life,” “Matchmaker, Matchmaker” and more. “Fiddler on the Roof” will screen at six Laemmle venues across Southern Cali- fornia. 7:30 p.m. $15 to $18. For tickets and more information, visit laemmle.com/fiddler.

ELON GOLD & FRIENDS: “MERRY EREV XMAS”

Enjoy an evening of comedy featuring comedian Elon Gold. Show times: 7:30, 9:30 and 11:30 p.m. $35. Laugh Factory, 8001 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. (323) 656-1336. ” target=”_blank”>infinitelight.la

OM SHALOM YOGA: HAVDALLANUKA EDITION

Say goodbye to Shabbat, welcome another day of Chanukah, stretch, sing, listen, have a bite and delight in your inner glow and outer light during Om Shalom and Beth Chayim Cha- dashim’s Havdalah and Chanukah-themed yoga practice. Bring a yoga mat, towel and water, and dress in comfortable exercise clothes. Light vegan finger food will be served. Om Sha- lom Yoga is led by Zack Lodmer and assisted by Jason Gamer and Cantor Juval Porat, and features live music. 6 p.m. $15 (No one will be turned away for lack of funds). Beth Chayim Chadashim, 6090 W. Pico Blvd., Los Angeles. ” target=”_blank”>matzoball.org.

SUN | DEC 25

HOLIDAY MEAL

All are welcome to join Temple Adat Elohim’s annual holiday meal. The event is open to com- munity members throughout the Conjeo Valley, from the homeless to those who are seeking ca- maraderie during the holiday season. This is a volunteer-driven event. 11:30 a.m. Free. Social Hall at Temple Adat Elohim, 2420 E. Hillcrest Drive, Thousand Oaks. (805) 497-7101. ” target=”_blank”>lajfilmfest.org.

Calendar: December 9-15


FRI | DEC 9

JEWS, MORMONS AND POLITICS

Hear professors Steven Windmueller (Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion Los Angeles) and Fred Woods (Brigham Young University) discuss “Political Trends in the Mormon and Jewish Communities” at a Shabbat service and program, part of the LDS-Jewish Academic Dialogue Project. 7:30 p.m. Free. Temple Ramat Zion, 17655 Devonshire St., Northridge. (818) 360-1881

Other events in the LDS-Jewish Academic Dialogue Project include on Dec. 10: Brigham Young University professors Shon Hopkin and Barbara Morgan Gardner answer “Questions You’ve Always Wanted to Ask About the Mormon Church.” 1 p.m. Free. Adat Ari El, 12020 Burbank Blvd., Valley Village. (818) 766-9426.

Also, on Dec. 11: Professors Andrew Reed (Brigham Young University) and David Kaufman (HUC-JIR in Los Angeles) discuss “Images of Jews and Mormons in Hollywood and the Media.” 3:30 p.m. Free. RSVP to (213) 884-4133, ext. 113 or efriedman@ajrca.edu. Academy for Jewish Religion, 3250 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 550, Los Angeles. (213) 884-4133.

SAT | DEC 10

CHANUKAH BASH

Enjoy a craft workshop, dinner and a concert with singer-songwriter Michelle Citrin. 4:30 p.m. $8 online with RSVP for dinner and concert; $10 at the door. Craft workshop projects vary in price. RSVP: ” target=”_blank”>tebh.org.

“ART AFTER DARK: FESTIVAL OF LIGHTS AND SHADOWS”

As a part of the Jewish Federation’s citywide Infinite Light program, YaBa (Young Adults @ Beth Am) and Theatre Dybbuk, featuring artist Alexa Meade and Jews Indigenous to the Middle East and North Africa, will present an evening of artistic enlightenment through artwork and performance. This new spin on Chanukah programming takes visitors on a journey through stories of finding light in the darkness. 7 p.m. Free. Temple Beth Am, 1039 S. La Cienega Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 652-7354. ” target=”_blank”>infinitelight.la.

SUN | DEC 11

HUMOR WITH MICHAEL KRASNY

The Jewish Journal and Writers Bloc present an “Afternoon on Jewish Humor” with author Michael Krasny and comedian Bobby Slayton. Krasny’s new book, “Let There Be Laughter: A Treasury of Great Jewish Humor and What It All Means,” is riddled with jokes, separated into segments with such names as “Schlemiels & Schmucks,” “Suffering, Jewish Mothers & Jewish Bubbies” and more. His explanations are often just as funny as the jokes. Moderated by book critic David Kipen. 2 p.m. $20. Temple Emanuel of Beverly Hills, Corwin Family Sanctuary, 300 N. Clark Drive, Beverly Hills. ” target=”_blank”>wizathon.com/wjcc5k/index.php.

CHANUKAH MARKETPLACE

A day of food, shopping and fun, with music by The BeatBuds. Proceeds benefit the Temple Israel of Hollywood Schools Scholarship Fund. 9 a.m. Free. Temple Israel of Hollywood, 7300 Hollywood Blvd., Los Angeles. (323) 876-8330. ” target=”_blank”>leobaecktemple.org.

COMMUNITY SERVICE: L’DOUGH V’DOUGH

Volunteer and team with Holocaust survivors to bake challah and hear their stories firsthand. 11 a.m. Free. Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust, 100 S. The Grove Drive, Los Angeles. (323) 761-8054. ” target=”_blank”>hartman.org.il.

TUES | DEC 13

“THE NEW REALITY: JEWS IN TRUMP’S AMERICA”

Jewish Journal presents this “Crucial Conversations” event featuring Jonathan Greenblatt, national director and CEO of the Anti-Defamation League; Rabbi Sharon Brous, founder and senior rabbi of IKAR; Dan Schnur, political analyst and director of USC’s Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics; Rabbi Ari Segal, head of the Shalhevet Institute; and Danielle Berrin, Jewish Journal senior writer. Join these speakers as they discuss what a Donald Trump presidency might mean for the United States and for the Jewish community, as well as many other timely questions. 7 p.m. Free; RSVP required at jewishjournal.com/events. Shalhevet High School, 910 S. Fairfax Ave., Los Angeles. (213) 368-1661. WED | DEC 14

THE EXECUTIVES SPEAKER SERIES BREAKFAST

Explore the topic of “What a Trump Presidency Means to Our Jewish Community.” The featured speaker is Steven Windmueller, Rabbi Alfred Gottschalk Emeritus Professor in Jewish Communal Service at the Jack H. Skirball Campus of Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion. He is an author in the field of Jewish political studies, having written more than 100 articles, books and essays on topics such as anti-Semitism, American Jewish political behavior, Jewish institutional trends, Jewish power and the Middle East. 7:30 a.m. Members: $30 preregistered; $35 at the door; nonmembers: $35 preregistered, $40 at the door. El Caballero Country Club, 18300 Tarzana Drive, Tarzana. (818) 774-3332. THURS | DEC 15

“LIGHT AND LAUGHTER”

Temple Emanuel’s Young Professionals member Danielle Soto hosts an event that promises lots of laughs. Zach Sherwin will be the headliner, with Adam Feuerberg, Rachele Friedland, Alex Mandelberg, Chad Lurie and others. This event is intended for professionals in their 20s and 30s who want to mingle and be a part of a fun-filled night. 7:30 p.m. $10. Includes complimentary beverage. RSVP at

Calendar: December 2-8


SUN | DEC 4

GLORIA STEINEM AND JILL SOLOWAY

Join an intimate conversation between Gloria Steinem and Jill Soloway, two extraordinary women who have devoted themselves to changing despair into hope. Steinem — a writer, lecturer, political activist and feminist organizer — includes among her areas of interest the origins of sex and race caste systems, nonviolent conflict resolution, and gender roles and child abuse as roots of violence. Soloway is the creator of the Golden Globe- and Emmy-winning show “Transparent.” She also co-founded the community organization East Side Jews and is the author of the memoir “Tiny Ladies in Shiny Pants.” Presented by CAP UCLA. 7 p.m. Tickets start at $29; $15 for UCLA students; $25 for UCLA faculty and staff. Royce Hall, UCLA, 340 Royce Drive, Los Angeles. ” target=”_blank”>templeetzchaim.org.

CHANUKAH BOUTIQUE

Shop early while helping to raise money for Gan Israel Preschool in Tarzana. There will be more than 35 vendors, food, free child care and raffle prizes. 11 a.m. Free. Chabad of Tarzana, 18181 Burbank Blvd., Tarzana. (818) 758-3838.

KIDNEY TRANSPLANT AWARENESS CONCERT

Rachel Silverman Stone from the Milken Community Schools class of 2001 is in need of a kidney transplant. Help raise awareness by attending this concert and learning more about kidney donation and saving a life. Featuring Kol Echad, HaZamir Los Angeles and more. 1 p.m. Free. Robert Margolis Performing Arts Center, 15800 Zeldins Way, Los Angeles. For more information, contact kshepard@milkenschool.org.

“THE STEDMAN STORY: MYSTERY, INTRIGUE, ADOPTION AND DNA”

The Jewish Genealogical Society of the Conejo Valley and Ventura County (JGSCV) will co-sponsor, with Temple Adat Elohim, a seminar called “The Stedman Story: Mystery, Intrigue, Adoption and DNA: Jewish Genealogy Strategies Unravel a Family Mystery.” This is a real-life story involving deception, bigamy, adoption and DNA. The secretive life of Jesse Oppenheimer, alias John Stedman (1887-1950), was unveiled by using family research techniques. Guest speaker Karen Franklin will discuss the trajectory of research beginning with Stedman’s son, Jon Stedman (1933-2009), whose papers Franklin was hired to organize five years ago. Franklin is the director of family research at the Leo Baeck Institute, chair of the Memorial Museums committee of the International Council of Museums and president of the Obermayer German Jewish History Awards. Guests will learn about the opportunities that DNA testing has been able to provide. 1:30 p.m. Free. Temple Adat Elohim, 2420 E. Hillcrest Drive, Thousand Oaks. (818) 889-6616. ” target=”_blank”>wbtla.org.

MON | DEC 5

LOS ANGELES JEWISH SYMPHONY EDUCATION OUTREACH CONCERT

The Los Angeles Jewish Symphony Education Outreach Program presents “A Patchwork of Cultures: Exploring the Sephardic-Latino Connection,” a free cultural program geared toward helping third-, fourth- and fifth-graders discover the music and cultures of our Spanish ancestors. There will be an “instrument petting zoo,” where children can explore the instruments that make up an orchestra. The concert will feature Cantor Marcelo Gindlin. 11 a.m. Free. Space is limited; RSVP to (818) 646-2844. Valley Beth Shalom, 15739 Ventura Blvd., Encino. 

YULA GIRLS COMEDY NIGHT

Prepare for a night of food, drinks and many laughs. Special guests include Greg Hahn, Jimmy Brogan, Dwight Slade and Cathy Ladman. Cocktails and hors d’oeuvres before the show at 6:30 p.m.; 7:30 p.m. show. $100. YULA Girls High School, 1619 S. Robertson Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 203-0755. TUES | DEC 6

BOUTIQUE ON THE BOULEVARD

Socialize while shopping from the city’s hottest vendors. Merchandise includes clothing for women and children, jewelry, housewares, toys and more. There also will be a bake sale. A portion of each sale will go to Wilshire Boulevard Temple’s school programs and scholarship funds. 9 a.m. Free. Wilshire Boulevard Temple, Irmas Campus, 11661 W. Olympic Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 445-1280. ” target=”_blank”>booksoup.com

YOGA WITH YOUNG ADULTS OF LOS ANGELES AND INFINITE LIGHT

Enjoy an evening of self-care, yoga and food, led by Om Shalom Yoga’s Zack Lodmer. Program of the NuRoots’ citywide Infinite Light Chanukah festival. 7 p.m. The Loft at Liz’s, 453 S. La Brea Ave., Los Angeles. (323) 761-8054. THURS | DEC 8

GEORGE GEARY

” target=”_blank”>booksoup.com.

Calendar: November 25- December 1


MON | NOV 28

HILLEL AT UCLA ART EXHIBITIONS 

Three art exhibitions are on display at Hillel at UCLA. “Seek My Face: The Art of Joshua Meyer, 2000-2016” features the work of Lubbock, Texas-born oil painter Joshua Meyer. He went to school at the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Jerusalem before attending Yale University. He currently works in Cambridge, Mass. Every painting he makes is “intentionally Jewish,” he says. The exhibition “WINGS” features the works of Harriet Zeitlin, who earned a bachelor’s degree at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. Later, she studied printmaking at UCLA and photography at Santa Monica College. She has been an artist for six decades, and has had 25 solo shows and exhibited in more than 100 group shows. The exhibition “The German Roots of Zionism” explores the dream of refuge from anti-Semitism, freedom from despots, and a place for Jewish religion and culture to flourish. 10 a.m to 4 p.m. Monday-Friday. Through Dec. 9. Free. 574 Hilgard Ave., Los Angeles. (310) 208-3081, ext. 108. TUES | NOV 29

MAINSTAGE

MainStage is the Jewish Federation of Greater Los Angeles’ annual young adult fundraising event. It inspires and entertains the crowd as leading innovators and influencers take the stage. Join hundreds of other young Jewish Angelenos on Giving Tuesday for a night of food, drinks and special guests. The talent lineup includes James Corden, host of “The Late Late Show With James Corden” on CBS; Ben Winston, the show’s executive producer; Kevin Demoff, chief operating officer and executive vice president of the Los Angeles Rams; Milana Vayntrub, comedian, actress and director; and other guests. 7 p.m. $130. Avalon Hollywood, 1735 Vine St., Los Angeles. (323) 761-8054. ” target=”_blank”>mainstagela.org.

“IRVING BERLIN’S WHITE CHRISTMAS”

For one week only, come see Broadway’s Tony Award-winning “Irving Berlin’s White Christmas” in its new production. The musical tells the story of two show business friends staging a production at a beautiful Vermont inn. Along the way, they find their perfect mates. Enjoy dancing, romance, laughter and songs, including “Count Your Blessings (Instead of Sheep),” “Happy Holidays,” “Sisters,” “Blue Skies” and the unforgettable title tune, “White Christmas.” Starring Sean Montgomery as Bob Wallace, Jeremy Benton as Phil Davis, Kerry Conte as Betty Haynes and Kelly Sheehan as Judy Haynes. 8 p.m. Tickets start at $35. Pantages Theatre, 6233 Hollywood Blvd., Los Angeles. (323) 468-1770.

Calendar: November 18-24


SAT | NOV 19

“STARING BACK AT THE SUN: VIDEO ART FROM ISRAEL, 1970-2012”

The art nonprofit organization Artis, in collaboration with Hauser Wirth & Schimmel, presents the Los Angeles launch of “Staring Back at the Sun: Video Art From Israel, 1970-2012,” an exhibition that has traveled internationally. It traces the development of contemporary video practice in Israel and highlights the work of 35 artists who have a critical perspective on the cultural and political landscape of Israel. It explores themes such as the prominence of political conflict in mass media and the liberalization of the economy, and includes early performances, films and videos never seen outside Israel. 11:30 a.m.- 5 p.m. Free. RSVP (required) available at eventbrite.com. Hauser Wirth & Schimmel, 901 E. Third St., Los Angeles. (213) 943-1620. ” target=”_blank”>theatre40.org.

LEAH KAMINSKY

Leah Kaminsky will discuss and sign her book “The Waiting Room.” The novel unfolds over the course of a single day but its story spans five decades. It tells of one family’s history of love, war and survival. The main character, Dina, is the daughter of Holocaust survivors. She becomes a doctor, emigrates and builds a family, but her life remains haunted by her parents’ pasts. When a terror alert is issued in her new city, she is pushed to the limit. Kaminsky will be in conversation with hypnotherapist and author Judith Simon Prager. 5 p.m. Free. Book Soup, 8818 Sunset Blvd., West Hollywood. (310) 659-3110. johnseeman@aol.com.

SUN | NOV 20

LOS ANGELES JEWISH HOME: 5K WALK OF AGES

The annual Walk of Ages is a family-fun 5K Walk/Run that raises funds for the seniors at the Los Angeles Jewish Home. Collect donations from your friends and family and join a team with friends, family or your favorite organization. All registered participants will receive a T-shirt, goodie bag and pancake breakfast after the race. Medals are awarded to the top competitive finishers in all age divisions. 7 a.m. registration; 8:15 a.m. walk. $36 for adults, $45 day of race; $18 for children, $25 day of race; free for seniors older than 80. Los Angeles Jewish Home, 7150 Tampa Ave., Reseda. (818) 774-3324. ” target=”_blank”>yala.org.

“STEFAN ZWEIG: FAREWELL TO EUROPE”

This film tells the story of Austrian Jewish writer Stefan Zweig and his journey in exile from 1936 to 1942. Best known for his novellas “The Royal Game” and “Letter From an Unknown Woman,” Zweig was one of the most-translated German-speaking writers of his time. When he was driven to emigrate at the peak of his career, Zweig fell into despair after Europe sank into war. The film is in French with English subtitles. Discussion with writer-director Maria Schrader will follow the screening. 3 p.m. Free. RSVP at eventbrite.com. Goethe-Institut Los Angeles, 5750 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (323) 525-3388. MON | NOV 21

“THE IMMIGRANT”

In this staged reading of Mark Harelik’s play, a young Russian-Jewish immigrant arrives in rural Texas in 1909, able to speak only Yiddish. Over the next 30 years in a Christian community, he makes a home and raises a family in a small Texas town. Based on the life of the playwright’s grandfather Haskell Harelik, “The Immigrant” is a story of religion meeting religion, culture meeting culture, fear meeting fear and love meeting love. 7 p.m. Free. Sierra Madre Playhouse, 87 W. Sierra Madre Blvd., Sierra Madre. (626) 355-4318. TUES | NOV 22

FAITHSGIVING COMMUNITY FAIR

Keep the faith and give thanks while enjoying food giveaways, cooking demonstrations, music, crafts and much more. In partnership with Holy Faith LA, Islamic Center, Kwang Yum Church, KYCC, Leo Baeck Temple, Pico Union Project, Seeds of Hope and Word of Encouragement Church. 4 p.m. Free. Pico Union Project, 1153 Valencia St., Los Angeles. (818) 760-1077. WED | NOV 23

INTERFAITH THANKSGIVING SERVICE

Take a step back and reflect on all you have to be grateful for. Rabbi Richard Spiegel will lead this service; neighbors from the United Methodist Church will be in attendance. 7:30 p.m. Free. Temple Etz Chaim, 1080 E. Janss Road, Thousand Oaks. (805) 497-6891. ” target=”_blank”>thewallis.org.

Calendar: September 2-8


FRI | SEPT 2

SHISHI ISRAELI FOR YOUNG ADULTS

Join in the new Kaballat Shabbat gathering in Los Angeles for young Jewish and Israeli adults, ages 25-40. Engage in a warm and welcoming Shabbat event with music, food and friends (new and old). There will be a traditional kosher-style dinner served and alcohol for those 21 and older. In collaboration with World Zionist Organization-Department for Diaspora Activities, Israeli-American Council (IAC) and Israeli House LA. 7:30 p.m. $25 general admission. IAC Shepher Community Center, 6530 Winnetka Ave., Woodland Hills. ” target=”_blank”>odysseytheatre.com.

SAT | SEPT 3

“MOONLIGHT AND MAGNOLIAS”

This comedy by Ron Hutchinson tells how one of the most iconic films in Hollywood history almost did not get made. It’s three weeks into filming “Gone With the Wind” — Atlanta has burned, Scarlett O’Hara has been cast — and there is no workable script. Producer David O. Selznick has five days to save the troubled production. Selznick brings in Victor Fleming to take over as director and screenwriter Ben Hecht to rewrite the script — but Hecht has never read the book it’s based on. So Selznick and Fleming hilariously re-enact scenes from the novel for Hecht to adapt into a screenplay that would become the epic, Academy Award-winning film. Directed by Stephanie A. Coltrin. Post-show party on opening night hosted by The Greek Mediterranean Steak & Seafood. 7 p.m. $95. Rubicon Theatre, 1006 E. Main St., Ventura. (805) 667-2900. SUN | SEPT 4

CHABAD TELETHON

The Chabad “To Life” telethon has become a worldwide, joyful celebration of life since it first aired in 1980. It is reminder of the power of good deeds, and donations have ranged from $1 up to thousands. The money goes to an array of Chabad efforts, such as education, summer camps, children with special needs, community outreach and crisis intervention, just to name a few. You will enjoy a star-studded lineup that includes the always-endearing “dancing rabbis.” Those in the Los Angeles area can watch on KSCI-TV (LA 18). 5 p.m. TUES | SEPT 6

CRUCIAL CONVERSATIONS: ELECTION 2016

The Jewish Journal and Sinai Temple Men’s Club present one in a series of Crucial Conversations, this one about the upcoming presidential election. Rabbi David Wolpe will moderate a discussion between Jewish Journal Publisher and Editor-in-Chief Rob Eshman and President David Suissa on topics including the fight against terrorism, U.S. national security and the U.S.-Israel relationship. 6:30 p.m. Free. $10 for dinner; free for Men’s Club and Sinai Temple members. RSVP is mandatory to rsvp@jewishjournal.com or (310) 474-1518, ext. 3340. Sinai Temple, 10400 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 474-1518. THURS | SEPT 8

AN EVENING OF MA’ALEH FILMS AND REFLECTION

The Ma’aleh Film School of Jerusalem returns to Los Angeles to screen award-winning short films by its graduate students, including one created by the Ma’aleh VideoTherapy Bereaved Fathers’ Group. You will also have the opportunity to meet Ofir Shaar, father of Gilad, one of the three boys kidnapped and murdered by Hamas in 2014; Keren Hakak, the filmmaker who guided the bereaved fathers group; and Neta Ariel, director of the Ma’aleh Film School of Jerusalem. Special guests include producer Zvi Howard Rosenman and newly appointed Israeli Consul General in Los Angeles Sam Grundwerg. 7 p.m. $75; $85 at the door. Laemmle Music Hall, 9036 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (323) 937-0980. ” target=”_blank”>nessah.org.

“STORIES FROM THE FRINGE: WOMEN RABBIS, REVEALED!”

This funny and insightful play chronicles the true stories of some of L.A.’s most beloved women rabbis. You will hear stories of determination, prayer, ritual and motherhood as you get a peek into the lives of such rabbis as Sharon Brous, Denise Eger, Laura Geller and Naomi Levy. This is Judaism’s feminist story of triumph as until less than 45 years ago, only men could pursue a career as a rabbi. There will be dessert and a post-show discussion with distinguished women rabbis. 8 p.m. $40. The Braid, 2912 Colorado Ave., No. 102, Santa Monica. (310) 315-1400.

Calendar: August 26 – September 1


FRI | AUG 26

SHABBAT IN THE PARK

Bring your family and friends, a picnic dinner, and come mingle with the community and all of the 16 congregations and Jewish organizations involved. There will be arts and crafts, a drum circle and Torah talks. The Shabbat service will be followed by live music by the Capa’im Band. 4:30 p.m. activities; 6 p.m. service. Free. RSVP at shabbatinthepark.org. Warner Park, 5800 Topanga Canyon Blvd., Woodland Hills. (818) 451-1179. ” target=”_blank”>falcontheatre.com.

SUN | AUG 28

ANNUAL JEWISH COMMUNITY DAY: DODGERS VS. CUBS

It’s time for a day at the ballpark on the 17th annual Jewish Community Day at Dodger Stadium as the Dodgers take on the Cubs. Join EMET and Young Adults of Los Angeles’ (YALA) Ben-Gurion and Chai societies in their field box for the special game, where Senior Chaplain at Cedars-Sinai Rabbi Jason Weiner will throw out the ceremonial first pitch. All attendees will receive a Hebrew Dodgers T-shirt, made especially for the day. Snacks and beverages will be provided, and attendees will also have the opportunity to purchase kosher hot dogs and other stadium favorites. This is a particularly exciting game for baseball fans as the Cubs are currently in first place in the National League Central, and the Dodgers are in a neck-and-neck race in the National League West. Ticket availability is limited. 1:10 p.m. $50; $35 for members of YALA’s Ben-Gurion or Chai societies. Dodger Stadium, 1000 Vin Scully Ave., Los Angeles. (323) 761-8054. ” target=”_blank”>adatshalomla.org.

OPEN FORUM DISCUSSION: YOUNG ADULTS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

Join this roundtable discussion/open forum for Israeli-American families who have young adults (18 years old and older) with special needs. Come hear about the programming the Israeli American Council (IAC) can help to provide. An ETTA professional, a parent and a regional center representative will be on the panel. Hosted by the IAC and ETTA. Coffee and dessert will be served. 7 p.m. Free. IAC Shepher Community Center, 6530 Winnetka Ave., Woodland Hills. (818) 574-1087. ” target=”_blank”>facebook.com/IVANartgallery.

THURS | SEPT 1

MATTHEW SPECKTOR SIGNS & DISCUSSES EVE BABITZ’S “SLOW DAYS, FAST COMPANY”

Novelist and screenwriter Matthew Specktor, who wrote the introduction for this edition of “Slow Days, Fast Company,” will be presenting and signing the book during this evening. There was a time in the 1960s and ’70s when no one was hotter than Eve Babitz; she seduced seemingly everyone who was anyone in Los Angeles. But there was one man who was elusive and so Babitz wrote him a book. “Slow Days, Fast Company” re-creates a Los Angeles of movie stars distraught over their success, socialites on days-long drug binges and soap-opera actors worried that tomorrow’s script will kill them off. In the end, it doesn’t matter whether Babitz ever gets the guy, because she seduces her audience. 7 p.m. Free. Book Soup, 8818 Sunset Blvd., West Hollywood. (310) 659-3110.

Calendar: March 25-31, 2016


FRI | MARCH 25

KEHILLAT ISRAEL PURIM EXTRAVAGANZA

Come in costume and see circus performers, play games, get your face painted and win prizes. There will also be a carnival for the younger ones in the Early Childhood Center. Dinner included. 5 p.m. carnival; 7 p.m. Shabbat service and megillah reading. $20 all-access wristbands. RSVP requested. Kehillat Israel, 16019 W. Sunset Blvd., Pacific Palisades. (310) 459-2328. ” target=”_blank”>facebook.com/congregationbethohr.

SAT | MARCH 26

BLOWOUT PURIM PARTY

Come get wild for Purim with live music by DJ River, an open bar, tapas and special guests. Don’t forget to wear a costume! 8 p.m. $65. Dance Revolution Studio, 6626 Valjean Ave., Van Nuys. (818) 836-6700. TUE | MARCH 29

WORDS, WIT & WISDOM

Join a variety of celebrated authors and enjoy a delicious lunch. Featured writers include Cheryl Cecchetto (“Passion to Create: Your Invitation to Celebrate”), Hollye Dexter (“Fire Season”), Frances Dinkelspiel (“Tangled Vines: Greed, Murder, Obsession and an Arsonist in the Vineyards of California”) and David Kukoff (“Children of the Canyon”). The event is sponsored by the Brandeis National Committee-San Fernando Valley Chapter and will be moderated by the Jewish Journal’s book editor and Los Angeles Times book reviewer, Jonathan Kirsch. Proceeds go to Brandeis University’s “Sustaining the Mind” initiative, which funds neurodegenerative disease research and science scholarships. 10 a.m. $75. Skirball Cultural Center, 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles. (818) 312-4403. WED | MARCH 30

BEHIND THE LENS: JOEL BERNSTEIN, HENRY DILTZ AND GRAHAM NASH

For one night only, three visionaries of American culture — Henry Diltz, Joel Bernstein and Graham Nash — will come together for a large-screen presentation and multi-decade retrospective. Legendary singer-songwriter Nash is a two-time Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee and internationally renowned photographer. Diltz, the official photographer at Woodstock and a founding partner at Morrison Hotel Gallery, has had his work grace hundreds of album covers. Bernstein’s work chronicles the inner lives and public moments of some of the most important music stars of our time, including Joni Mitchell, Neil Young, Bob Dylan and Bruce Springsteen. Original hand-signed photos will be for sale. Tickets: $50. 6:30 p.m. (doors), 7:30 p.m. (show). Largo at the Cornet, 366 N. La Cienega Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 855-0350. ” target=”_blank”>friendsofroots.net.

FEDCONNECT NETWORKING LUNCH

Meet The Jewish Federation of Greater Los Angeles’ president and CEO, Jay Sanderson, while you eat and learn about the future of Jewish life in Los Angeles at this FedConnect event for local professionals. Noon. Free. Pessah Law Group, 1808 Century Park East, 26th floor, Los Angeles. (323) 761-8291. THUR | MARCH 31

JILL BIALOSKY AND ROB SPILLMAN: DISCUSSION AND BOOK SIGNING

In Jill Bialosky’s “The Prize,” Edward Darby has everything a man could hope for: meaningful work, a loving wife and a beloved daughter. He strives not to let ambition, money, power and his dark past corrode his life, but when a celebrated artist betrays him and another very different artist awakens his heart and stirs up secrets from his past, Darby finds himself unhinged. Rob Spillman, co-founding editor of the legendary Tin House magazine, has devoted his life to the rebellious pursuit of artistic authenticity. After several relocations, Spillman discovered he was chasing the one thing that had always eluded him — a place or person to call home. In his memoir, “All Tomorrow’s Parties,” Spillman narrates a colorful and music-filled coming-of-age story of an artist’s life and a cultural exploration of a changing Berlin. 7 p.m. Free. Book Soup, 8818 Sunset Blvd., West Hollywood. (310) 659-3110. ” target=”_blank”>yala.org.

“STELLA’S LAST J-DATE”

This is the world premiere of Andy Rooster Bloch’s romantic comedy about a high-stakes blind date from the point of view of two lost New York singles. What are they willing to endure to not be lonely? Stella is a chatty and lovable dog trainer with intense baggage; Isaac is an alcoholic school teacher with his own skeletons. Isaac will ultimately have to muster up his inner strength to fight for Stella. Directed by Bryan Rasmussen. 8 p.m. $25. Tickets at jdate.brownpapertickets.com. Ages 18 and older. Whitefire Theatre, 13500 Ventura Blvd., Sherman Oaks. (818) 990-2324.

Calendar: July 24-30


FRI | JULY 24

“THE OUTRAGEOUS SOPHIE TUCKER”

From rags to riches, Sophie Tucker and her big personality paved the way for performers such as Madonna, Bette Midler and Lady Gaga. The opening-night film of this year’s Los Angeles Jewish Film Festival is now in theaters around Los Angeles. It was written and produced by Susan and Lloyd Ecker, who went through more than 400 of Tucker’s personal scrapbooks and met with many of her friends and family members to get the full story that you will see on the screen. Directed by Academy Award-nominated documentary filmmaker William Gazecki. Times vary. Playhouse 7, 673 E. Colorado Blvd., Pasadena; Town Center 5, 17200 Ventura Blvd., Encino. laemmle.com.

SUN | JULY 26

LIL REV & FRED SOKOLOW

Two funny Jewish guys … what a great way to end the weekend and get ready for the week ahead. Fred Sokolow, best known for his 150 instructional books and DVDs for guitar, banjo, ukulele, mandolin and many more, is a multistring performer and recording artist with a passion that shines through, whether he’s playing the blues, a ragtime piece or a screaming rock-guitar solo. Lil Rev, often called the Jewish Pete Seeger, will bring his high energy to this heartfelt concert as he seamlessly moves among song, story, poetry and humor. 7 p.m. $20. The Coffee Gallery Backstage, 2029 N. Lake Ave., Altadena. (626) 798-6236. coffeegallery.com.

“BAD JEWS”

The New York Times calls it “the best comedy of the season” — and tonight is the last night to see it in Los Angeles. Joshua Harmon’s off-Broadway play explores the question: Is there such thing as a “bad Jew”? Daphna swears she is the most devout Jew of her family. But after the death of her grandfather, her less-observant cousin Liam comes to town, and the two argue about who is the rightful heir to their grandfather’s chai necklace, which he kept safe during his time in a concentration camp by hiding it under his tongue. Despite their differing sense of Judaism, they learn to navigate through their kvetching with chutzpah and humor. Directed by Matt Shakman and starring Ari Brand, Molly Ephraim, Lili Fuller and Raviv Ullman. 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. $37-$72. Geffen Playhouse, 10886 Le Conte Ave., Los Angeles. (310) 208-5454. geffenplayhouse.com.

TUES | JULY 28 

“BENT”

This is the first major U.S. revival of Martin Sherman’s “Bent” since its Broadway premiere in 1979. From director Moises Kaufman (“The Laramie Project”) comes this groundbreaking drama about the power of love under some of history’s most inhumane conditions. “Bent” chronicles the struggles of two gay men in Nazi Germany who are fighting not just for their right to love, but also for their right to live. The beautiful and moving story is brought to life on stage and shows the unbreakable force of the human spirit. 8 p.m. Through Aug. 23. $55-$75. Mark Taper Forum, 135 N. Grand Ave., Los Angeles. (213) 628-2772. centertheatregroup.org.

THUR | JULY 30

LOVE FEST: LOVE ANGELES

Greet the end of summer with a bang — or a hike, or a bonfire, or a tour through Hollywood Forever Cemetery. The annual citywide celebration of love and Tu b’Av is back with a new twist: Instead of one big party, East Side Jews is collaborating with organizations all over the city for three days of fun events. The fest kicks off Thursday night on the Eastside with “Love After Dark: Griffith Park Sunset Hike.” Hike through the canyons of Griffith Park up to the observatory and see why this spot is considered one of L.A.’s most famous lookouts. Snacks will be provided, but feel free to bring your own. Don’t forget to pack a picnic blanket! Over on the Westside, join Moishe House Venice and NuRoots for “Ignite Your Fire: A Midsummer’s Night Beach Bonfire” with camp games, s’mores and drinks. Other offerings of Love Fest include a Shabbat potluck dinner at the revamped Echo Park Lake and a garden cocktail party under a full moon. Hike: 7:15 p.m. Free. 4730 Crystal Springs Drive, Los Angeles. Bonfire: 7 p.m. Free. Dockweiler Beach, near lifeguard tower 53. RSVP requested. (323) 663-2255.

Calendar: June 6–June 12


SAT | JUNE 6

“ON TIDY ENDINGS”

Is this grief big enough for the two of us? That’s the issue between a gay man and a straight woman who meet to tie up loose ends after the death of the man they both loved. Set in 1987, Harvey Fierstein’s one-act play, part of his “Safe Sex” trilogy, is a study of the universal situation of losing a loved one and the unique quality of mourning that rose within the context of AIDS. Directed by Sara Wagner, the production is part of the 2015 Hollywood Fringe Festival. 10:30 p.m. $12. Through June 27. The Complex’s East Theatre, 6468 Santa Monica Blvd., Los Angeles. (323) 465-0383. SUN | JUNE 7

“FOLLOWING SHIRA’S JOURNEY: A GREEK JEWISH ODYSSEY”

The Los Angeles Greek Film Festival invites us to better understand a part of our own history. Filmmakers Carol Gordon and Natalie Cunningham present the untold story of the Greek Holocaust. History records an 87 percent loss of Greece’s Jewish population as a result of the Nazi atrocities of World War II, yet the experiences of these once-dynamic communities are scarcely known. It’s the U.S. premiere of this moving documentary, with music composed by John Koudounis. Noon. $12 (online), $15 (at door). Egyptian Theatre, 6712 Hollywood Blvd., Los Angeles. ” target=”_blank”>km-synagogue.org.

TUE | JUNE 9

AN EVENING WITH JUDY BLUME

A new book is in bloom! Perhaps you know her best for “Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret,” “Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing” or any other of her more than 25 books. Now you can know Judy Blume for a new novel, “In the Unlikely Event.” Blume weaves together three generations of families, friends and strangers whose lives are profoundly changed by a succession of disasters. Inspired by a series of real-life plane crashes that occurred in her hometown, Elizabeth, N.J., the book may offer an interesting glimpse into this prolific author. Blume will be in discussion with KPCC host Alex Cohen. 7:30 p.m. $25. The Aratani Theatre at the Japanese American Cultural & Community Center, 244 S. San Pedro St., Los Angeles. (213) 628-2725. THUR | JUNE 11

GOOD-FOOD GALA

Celebrate the first five years of the Los Angeles Food Policy Council and its collaborative efforts to create a more just and sustainable food system in our region. KCRW’s Evan Kleiman will emcee the evening while Redbird and BLD chef/owner Neal Fraser offers a locally sourced tasting menu. The program will honor “good-food heroes” Marqueece Harris-Dawson, Steve Zimmer and Robert Gottlieb. KCRW’S DJ Raul Campos will provide the tunes. It’s a good cause, and it’s certainly good eatin’. 6 p.m. $150. Vibiana, 214 S. Main St., Los Angeles. ” target=”_blank”>skylightbooks.com.

FRI | JUNE 12

DEB BOWEN: NEW CONVERSATIONS ON HOLOCAUST EDUCATION

More than a decade ago, Deb Bowen was inspired by Holocaust survivors and decided to act on it by encouraging young authors and illustrators to preserve survivor stories in storybook form. The project, “A Book by Me,” has expanded to more than 90 book titles that were created by kids, for kids. Now revealing the behind-the-scenes of this project, Bowen, in her book “A Walk With Esther,” shares the relationships between these young authors and their subjects. Noon. Free. Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust, 100 S. The Grove Drive, Los Angeles. (323) 651-3704.

Calendar May 23–29


SAT | MAY 23

NEIL DIAMOND

Sweet Caroline, we’re in for a treat! An inductee of the Songwriters Hall of Fame and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, an honoree at the Kennedy Center and a Grammy winner, Neil Diamond has been warming our hearts for decades. You know you love “Song Sung Blue,” “Desiree” and “You Don’t Bring Me Flowers,” to name a few, so grab your ticket and let the good times feel so good. 8 p.m. $45-$350. Hollywood Bowl, 2301 N. Highland Ave., Los Angeles. (323) 850-2000. WED | MAY 27

“SITTING IN BARS WITH CAKE: LESSONS AND RECIPES FROM ONE YEAR OF TRYING TO BAKE MY WAY TO A BOYFRIEND”

Audrey Shulman knows a little something about the pursuit of love in Los Angeles. So, like any good Jew, she turned to food. In her new book, Shulman recounts a year of baking, bar-hopping and offering slices of cake to men in hopes of finding her beshert — or just a date. Her personal frustrations, though, led to a charming book of inventive recipes inspired by her bar interactions. From Sticky Maple Kiss Cake to Bitter Chocolate Dump Cake, there’s a treat for every occasion. 7 p.m. Free. Book Soup, 8818 W. Sunset Blvd., West Hollywood. (310) 659-3110. ” target=”_blank”>cjs.ucla.edu.

FIRST 36 PROJECT LAUNCH EVENT

Because we all know that Jewish learning begins at birth, if not before, it’s time cutting-edge research is setting out to reinforce early our next generation’s connection to the faith. Parent-and-me educators at six local Jewish institutions will get lots of support from a yearlong fellowship, The First 36 Project, a new initiative supported by The Jewish Federation of Greater Los Angeles, the Builders of Jewish Education and the Simms/Mann Institute. Early childhood professionals and community members are invited to the project’s launch. 12:45 p.m., The Jewish Federation of Greater Los Angeles, 6505 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. L.Silverstein@SimmsMannInstitute.org.

“LOVE FROM AFAR: A MULTIMEDIA CONCERT”

Sometimes we don’t have to pick just one form of media. Tonight’s concert features live music by two contemporary composers — Osvaldo Golijov and Kaija Saariaho — as well as video graphic design by Yuki Izumihara. Golijov, who was born in Argentina but eventually moved to Israel, where he studied under Mark Kopytman at the Jerusalem Music Academy, has two Grammys and is the recipient of Guggenheim and MacArthur fellowships. The program features a folk-song cycle for soprano, electronics and chamber ensemble, with the help of soprano Terri Richter and the UCLA Philharmonia. 7:30 p.m. Free, but a ticket is required; first-come, first-served. Hammer Museum, 10899 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 443-7000.  THUR | MAY 28

NIYAZ FEATURING AZAM ALI

Led by vocalist Azam Ali and multi-instrumentalist Loga Ramin Torkian, this band combines medieval Sufi poetry and folk songs from its native Iran with rich acoustic instrumentation and modern electronic rhythms. The result explores themes such as the plights of the immigrant, and ethnic and religious minorities. 8 p.m. $25-$35. Skirball Cultural Center, 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 440-4500. ” target=”_blank”>staplescenter.com.

Calendar: April 3–10


FRI | APRIL 3

“PASSAGES”

Chronicling the history of the Bible, from its transmission and translation to its impact and controversies, the traveling exhibition “Passages” features about 400 artifacts set against immersive environments like the caves of Qumran and the Jerusalem Chamber at Westminster Abbey. Covering a religious spectrum from Jewish to Protestant, the show’s diversity means it aims for a diverse audience. Hours vary. Through Feb. 27, 2016. $12 (general), $10 (children and seniors). 26565 Bouquet Canyon Road, Santa Clarita. (888) 297-8011. SAT | APRIL 4

“2ND NIGHT: NOT YOUR ZAYDE’S SEDER!”

Trying to figure out how to compete with night one of a family-filled seder? Grab your zayde and get it right the second night with Temple Judea’s celebration filled with food, music, four famous questions and the “prince of kosher gospel,” Joshua Nelson. Nelson, a Black Jew, infuses his music with both parts of his identity. He’s sung with Aretha Franklin and The Klezmatics, and was hailed the “next big thing” by Oprah Winfrey. 5 p.m. $35-$70. Temple Judea, 5429 Lindley Ave., Tarzana. (818) 758-3800. ” target=”_blank”>thejar.com.

TUE | APRIL 7

CAROL ES

This L.A.-based multimedia artist went on a day trip near Joshua Tree National Park in the spring of 2014. Thanks to her new solo exhibition, “Exodus,” that trip is now an experience for us as well. Using mixed-media collages and a series of paintings, Es — who took photographs and video footage, kept a journal and practiced meditation — reveals her journey through the wilderness and the self-reflection it inspired. 10 a.m. Through May 9. Free. Shulamit Gallery, 17 N. Venice Blvd., Venice. (310) 281-0961. THUR | APRIL 9

MOBY AND GENE BAUR

Author of “Living the Farm Sanctuary Life” Gene Baur and musician and animal-rights activist Moby sit down with Time magazine’s Joel Stein to discuss an eco- and animal-friendly lifestyle. With a focus on connecting with nature wherever you are and making the world a better place, the program will inform and inspire, whether you change your eating habits or don’t. There will be a book signing after the conversation. 8 p.m. Free. Skirball Cultural Center, 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 440-4500. ” target=”_blank”>hammer.ucla.edu.

THUR | APRIL 10

“WHILE WE’RE YOUNG”

Married couple Josh and Cornelia are living a childless, New York, middle-aged life. As their other friends settle into their lives as parents, the couple gravitates toward a young hipster couple, Jamie and Darby. Directed by Noah Baumbach (“Frances Ha”) and starring Ben Stiller, Naomi Watts, Adam Driver and Amanda Seyfried, the film is an honest and fun look at adolescence at any age, and the journeys that some people decide to take together, for better or worse. Hip-hop dance scenes and social paranoia included. Various times. At theaters citywide. 

Calendar: January 4–10


SAT | JAN 4

ILIZA SHLESINGER

She’s the first female and youngest comedian to win NBC’s “Last Comic Standing.” She’s had a half-hour special on “Comedy Central Presents,” she’s worked with “Pauly Shore & Friends” on Showtime, Chelsea Handler on E!, Joel McHale on “The Soup” and NBC’s “Last Call with Carson Daly.” Whether she’s discussing our responsibility to polar bears or what missing teeth can reveal, she discusses it with biting expertise. 18 and older. Sat. 8 p.m. $15 (two-item minimum). Hollywood Improv, 8162 Melrose Ave., Hollywood. (323) 651-2583. ” target=”_blank”>geffenplayhouse.com


WED | JAN 8

DARA FRIEDMAN 

In Dara Friedman’s “PLAY, Parts 1 & 2,” 17 couples — some fictionally paired and some in real-life relationships with one another — develop and play out improvised scenes of intimacy. Filmed during Friedman’s residency with the Hammer, “PLAY” features the actors in poetic, intense and humorous situations that grow from improvisational games. Friedman will participate in a Q-and-A following the screening. Wed. 7:30 p.m. Free. Billy Wilder Theater at the Hammer Museum, 10899 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 443-7000. THU | JAN 9

“THE ROLE OF THE FORGOTTEN MOURNER”

Rabbi Daniel Greyber returns to Southern California to discuss his most recent book, “Faith Unravels: A Rabbi’s Struggle With Grief and God.” What are the rules for dealing with the loss of a friend, mentor or colleague? Greyber, the former executive director of Camp Ramah in California, speaks to the pain experienced by the forgotten mourners by sharing personal stories of faith lost and regained anew. Kosher lunch served. RSVP required to park in building. Thu. Noon. $18 (nonmembers), $10 (Sinai Temple, Camp Ramah members). Sinai Temple, 10400 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 481-3243. ” target=”_blank”>skirball.org


FRI | JAN 10

N’SHAMA WOMEN’S RETREAT

What better way to start off the New Year than with a renewal of the soul in nature’s beauty? Valley Beth Shalom and Temple Aliyah host a women’s weekend to celebrate Shabbat Shira. Join Rabbi Nina Bieber Feinstein and Cindy Paley Aboody at the Brandeis-Bardin Institute for two days of spiritual prayer, song and learning, dancing, drumming, hikes, a margarita bar and more. You are woman — make some time to roar (and relax). Through Jan. 11. Fri. $225 (double occupancy). Brandeis-Bardin Campus, 1101 Peppertree Lane, Simi Valley. (818) 222-0192. ” target=”_blank”>templealiyah.org

SHABBAT SHIRA — THE SHABBAT OF SONG

Temple Emanuel celebrates 75 years of music and prayer with the help of Los Angeles’ premier Jewish choir, the Los Angeles Zimriyah Chorale, conducted by Nick Strimple. Fri. 6:30 p.m. Free (service only), $18 (dinner, adult), $12 (dinner, child). Temple Emanuel of Beverly Hills, 300 N. Clark Drive, Beverly Hills. (310) 843-9588. ” target=”_blank”>templejudea.com.

Moving and Shaking: Janos Ader visits Congregation Bais Naftolil; Tour de Summer Camps


Traveling through Hancock Park in a motorcade on Oct. 27, Janos Ader, president of the Republic of Hungary, visited Congregation Bais Naftoli, where he participated in a breakfast held in his honor. Rabbi Avi Leibovic, spiritual leader of Bais Naftoli and executive director of Aish Tamid, introduced the program. 

The event underscored the progress that has been made in relations between Jews and the non-Jewish Hungarian community in the decades since the Holocaust, when Hungary was allied with Nazi Germany and played a role in the persecution of the Jewish people. Ader’s local appearance followed recent remarks by Tibor Navracsics, Hungary’s deputy prime minister, recognizing the country’s role in the Holocaust. The Los Angeles event also acknowledged the Hungarian government’s increasingly hardened stance against anti-Semitism.

Bais Naftoli President Andrew Friedman organized the meeting, which featured Leibovic reciting a special blessing required when greeting the president of a country who has the constitutional power to pardon individuals. Afterward, Friedman recited a traditional prayer in Hungarian.

Hungarian first lady Anita Herczegh accompanied Ader, along with a 14-member, high-level delegation. Additional attendees included Laszlo Kalman, consul general of Hungary in Los Angeles; Miklos Perehazy, president of United Magyar House, an L.A.-based Hungarian community center; and Hungarian Ambassador to the United States Szapary Gyorgy.

Near the end of the event, Ader presented a booklet to the congregation in memory of the synagogue’s founder, Alex Friedman


Cycling team the Ramah Roadies beat out the Sinai Family Minyan Spinners on Oct. 27, during The Jewish Federation of Greater Los Angeles’ inaugural fundraising cycling event, Tour de Summer Camps, which raised money for scholarships for Jewish camps.

A total of 475 riders signed up for various distances, with some participating as individuals and others on teams. Together they raised approximately $600,000 through donations and sponsorships to benefit Camps Akiba, Alonim, Gilboa, Hess Kramer, JCA Shalom and Ramah; Gindling Hilltop Camp; Kibbutz Max Straus; and Moshava Malibu. 

The Sunday event underscored Federation’s longstanding commitment to the Jewish camps movement, which is widely believed to foster a sense of Jewish identity and planting the seeds for future Jewish leaders. Routes were 18 miles, 36 miles, 62 miles and 100 miles, and at the end of the afternoon, many riders came together at Brandeis-Bardin, the Simi Valley campus of American Jewish University.

“It was an incredible day, beyond all my expectations, especially since it was our inaugural event. I’m so proud of all the participants,” said Rodney Freeman, Tour de Summer Camps ride master, as quoted by The Federation. 

Top fundraisers included Freeman, Aaron Leibovic, Mark Samuel, Jay Reisbaum and Ari Eisenberg. The top teams were the Ramah Roadies, Team REC/YLDI, Sinai Family Minyan Spinners, Team Shomrei Torah and Temple Beth Am Cycles.

Moving and Shaking acknowledges accomplishments by members of the local Jewish community, including people who start new jobs, leave jobs, win awards and more, as well as local events that featured leaders from the Jewish and Israeli communities. Got a tip? E-mail it to ryant@jewishjournal.com.

Moving and Shaking: Milken Jewish Educator Awards and USCJ conference


Osnat Bernstein of Abraham Joshua Heschel Day School was one of four recipients of this year's Jewish Educator Award. Courtesy of the Milken Family Foundation.

Four educators at area Jewish schools were awarded $15,000 Milken Jewish Educator Awards by the Milken Family Foundation earlier this month.

The annual prizes this year went to Deborah Raskin, principal at Or HaChaim Academy, an Orthodox elementary and middle school in North Hollywood; Mickey Rabinov, a Hebrew and Judaic studies teacher and administrator at Beth Hillel Day School in Valley Village; Osnat Bernstein, a middle school Hebrew teacher at Abraham Joshua Heschel Day School in Northridge; and Benny Ferdman, founding artistic director and visual arts teacher at New Community Jewish High School in West Hills.

The prize, which comes with the hefty, unrestricted cash award for each recipient, recognizes outstanding teachers, administrators and other education professionals in the Greater Los Angeles area who work at day schools affiliated with BJE–Builders of Jewish Education. The award was established in 1990.

BJE executive director Gil Graff, along with Richard Sandler, executive vice president of the Milken Family Foundation, which promotes education and medical research, surprised the four local educators during school assemblies at each campus on Oct. 15.

“The Jewish Educator Awards call upon others in the profession to emulate the high standards of those we honor today — educators whose intelligence, scholarship, creativity and compassion help guide children to greater success, while preserving the heritage that gives meaning to that success,” Sandler wrote in a statement.

The award recognizes day school educators from across the Jewish spectrum in elementary and secondary education, while increasing public support for them and raising awareness of their contributions to the community and society. The cash award also encourages able, caring and creative people to choose a career in education, according to the foundation’s Web site. 

The foundation works in cooperation with BJE, the central agency for Jewish education in Los Angeles, in identifying winners.


Attendees of the United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism (USCJ) centennial this month included Orange County resident Missy Jane (third from left), Academy Jewish Religion, California cantorial student Amy Robinson (fifth from left) and Temple Aliyah’s Cantor Mike Stein (eighth from left).  Photo courtesy of USCJ.

When the United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism’s (USCJ) centennial conference took place in Baltimore, Md., Oct. 13-15 with the theme, “Conversation of the Century,” the event drew some of the movement’s most prominent West Coast leaders.

The Los Angeles contingent included a number of rabbis from American Jewish University: Rabbi Bradley Shavit Artson, dean of the Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies; Rabbi Elliot Dorff, rector and professor of philosophy; Ron Wolfson, a professor at the Graduate Center for Education, and others. Rabbi Ed Feinstein of Valley Beth Shalom in Encino and Hazzan Mike Stein of Temple Aliyah in Woodland Hills were also among the attendees.

As the keynote speaker on Oct. 13, Artson reflected on these changing times: “All wisdom traditions struggle in an age in which the shifts in culture are so massive that they will not be met by merely a few institutional adjustments, as valuable as those may be. Nor will they revive because of a changed name or the slick slogan, although those might also be helpful. No, our challenge is to step beyond habit, to reach beyond fear, to return to a core vision that is worthy of our passion and our talents and our lives.”

Feinstein commented on the recent study by the Pew Research Center, “A Portrait of Jewish Americans,” which suggests Jewish affiliation is on the decline and that the Conservative movement, in particular, faces a difficult road ahead, during an Oct. 14 morning session. 

“Our house is on fire. If you don’t read anything else in the Pew report, [it is that] we have maybe 10 years left,” Feinstein is quoted as saying in media reports. “In the next 10 years you will see a rapid collapse of synagogues and the national organizations that support them.”

According to the USCJ Web site, the conference — which was preceded by a two-day Shabbaton — highlighted “the future, the challenges and opportunities we face in re-imaging our kehillot – our sacred communities – for a changing Jewish world and over 1.5 million members.”

It brought together more than 100 speakers and artists and featured lectures, discussions, study and breakout sessions, workshops and musical performances. More than 1,200 lay leaders, professionals, leaders, congregants, students and clergy attended.

Founded in 1913, USCJ is the umbrella organization for Conservative congregations in North America. Last week’s event marked the USCJ 100th anniversary and served as the association’s biennial. 


Moving and Shaking acknowledges accomplishments by members of the local Jewish community, including people who start new jobs, leave jobs, win awards and more, as well as local events that featured leaders from the Jewish and Israeli communities. Got a tip? E-mail it to ryant@jewishjournal.com.

Calendar: September 28–October 4


SAT | SEP 28

“THE GUARDSMAN”

If you thought your beautiful new spouse was cheating on you, wouldn’t you create a disguise and test her fidelity? Ferenc Molnar’s comic game of love and marriage may or may not remind you of you and yours, but with wit and deception aplenty, it’ll certainly be fun to watch. Directed by Michael Michetti. Sat. 8 p.m. Through Nov. 30. $34-$54. A Noise Within, 3352 E. Foothill Blvd., Pasadena. (626) 356-3100. SUN | SEP 29

PEDAL FOR PEACE

StandWithUs wants you to ride with them! The international nonprofit is cycling 60 miles from West Los Angeles to Oxnard in support of Israel. If that sounds a little far, participants can opt for a shorter ride and three-mile walk in Oxnard. And don’t worry, if you can’t find your sneakers, you can still sponsor someone! The journey will conclude with a kosher lunch at the Emerson beach house along with free T-shirts. Suggested donations for walkers and riders. Sun. 6:30 a.m. Meeting location to be announced. (310) 836-6140. ” target=”_blank”>westhollywoodbookfair.org.

WILSHIRE BOULEVARD TEMPLE DEDICATION

It’s a coming-out (again) party! Renewed and ready for action, come celebrate the community-wide (and interfaith) dedication of the newly transformed Wilshire Boulevard Temple. The choral concert will include 150 voices from the Cantorial Choir of the Academy for Jewish Religion and a special closing performance by Burt Bacharach. Sun. 5 p.m. Free. RSVP required. Wilshire Boulevard Temple, Erika J. Glazer Family Campus, 3663 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (424) 208-8932. MON | SEP 30

“PHOTO OPPORTUNITY”

It’s a presidential election year. A candidate makes a campaign stop and meets an elderly Jewish woman — what they learn about each other is a secret that haunts her and threatens him. Joshua Metzger’s play, directed by Elizabeth Sampson, will be read featuring actors Judith Scarpone, Amy Tolsky, Chet Grissom and Laurie Okin. The playwright, a prior winner of the National Playwrights Conference, will be in discussion after the performance. Tue. 8 p.m. Free. NoHo Senior Arts Colony, 10747 Magnolia Blvd., North Hollywood. (818) 761-8838. TUE | OCT 1

“ETGAR KERET: IS REALITY OVERRATED?”

 

The Israeli author, filmmaker, professor, thinker, mover and shaker is in conversation with Literary Death Match host Adrian Todd Zuniga. Internationally acclaimed for his short stories, which have been published in more than 20 languages, Keret will read from his newest collection, “Suddenly, a Knock on the Door.” A signing and a reception follow the discussion, which is sure to be a reality check. Tue. 5:30-7:30 p.m. Free. RSVP required. UCLA Fowler Museum, Lenart Auditorium, Room A103B, Los Angeles. (310) 825-9646. THU | OCT 3

YOSSI KLEIN HALEVI

The globally revered journalist discusses his new book “Like Dreamers: The Story of the Israeli Paratroopers Who Reunited Jerusalem and Divided a Nation.” Chronicling the 40-year story of the soldiers who reunited Jerusalem and divided a nation, it’s one of the year’s more controversial stories. Sponsored by the Younes & Soraya Nazarian Center for Israel Studies and UCLA Hillel. Thu. 3-4:15 p.m. Free. Please register. UCLA School of Law, Room 1314, Los Angeles. (310) 825-9646. ” target=”_blank”>lajfilmfest.org.

DUDAMEL & BRONFMAN 

As part of its 10th anniversary celebration, the Walt Disney Concert Hall is honoring composer Peter Lieberson. Having premiered Lieberson’s “Neruda Songs” in 2005, it is only fitting that the L.A. Phil premieres the late composer’s last piece: “Shing Kham.” Under conductor Gustavo Dudamel, the orchestra, international pianist Yefim Bronfman and percussionist Pedro Carneiro collaborate for a memorable and moving night of melody that includes Schubert’s Symphony No. 4 and Tchaikovsky’s Piano Concerto No. 1. Through Oct. 6. Thu. 8 p.m. $77.50-$180. Walt Disney Concert Hall, 111 S. Grand Ave., downtown. (323) 850-2000.

Moving and Shaking: Shawn Landres receives NextGen Award, ADL honors philanthropists


NextGen Award recipient Shawn Landres. Photo via Google+

Jewish-innovation advocate Shawn Landres praised the Liberty Hill Foundation when the social change organization named him the recipient of its 2013 NextGen Award during its recent Change L.A. ceremony, but he could have just as easily been speaking about the diversity of the city he calls home. 

“Liberty Hill celebrates all of us for who we are and the communities we come from: religious, spiritual or secular, immigrant or homegrown, LGBTQI or not; African-American, Asian-American, Latino, European or all of the above; Boyle Heights, West Hollywood, Santa Monica, Lynwood, Calabasas and beyond,” the co-founder and CEO of Jewish think tank Jumpstart said, accepting his award on Sept. 8.

Given out annually, the NextGen award recognizes individuals who contribute toward the advancement of social justice.

Kafi Blumenfield, president and CEO of the Liberty Hill Foundation, presented Landres with the honor. Incoming Liberty Hill CEO Shane Goldsmith accompanied her onstage during the event, which took place at mid-Wilshire bar Busby’s East. L.A. City Controller Ron Galperin gave Landers a certification of recognition on behalf of the city as well.

Community members in attendance included Jumpstart co-founder Joshua Avedon and board members Richard Siegel, Rhoda Weisman and Adam Weiss; Rabbi Sarah Bassin of NewGround; L.A. City Councilman Bob Blumenfield and others. 

Sponsors included the Jewish Community Foundation of Los Angeles, Bill Resnick, Paula and Barry Litt, the Jumpstart board of directors, IKAR; Julie Hermelin and Sinai Temple. Several Jewish organizations and leaders served on the ceremony’s host committee.


From left: Anti-Defamation League honorees Leonard Comden and Steve Wasserman.

Mitch Dunitz, Leonard Comden and Steve Wasserman were honored for their philanthropic support of the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) on Sept. 11 at the 30th annual ADL/El Caballero Golf Tournament, a collaboration between the ADL and El Caballero Country Club in Tarzana. The event helped raise more than $250,000 for the ADL, according to the organization’s Web site.

Dunitz offered inspiration for other potential philanthropists when he said, “There is no shame in making the calls; there is only shame in not answering the calls when you’re in a position to help.”

Dunitz of Sherman Oaks, who received the Sam Saltsman Award, named after the late Jewish community leader and founder of the annual tournament, is a former president of the Tarzana country club and founder of the real estate investment firm MD Investments. The Distinguished Community Service Award went to Comden of Tarzana and Wasserman of Woodland Hills, who run the law firm Wasserman, Comden, Casselman and Esensten, LLP.

The honors were well deserved, according to an ADL statement that read: “ADL is pleased to celebrate these three honorees for their work in the community and their commitments to philanthropy.” The civil rights agency’s mission is combating anti-Semitism, hate and bigotry.

The event featured 18 holes of golf, dinner, an awards presentation and a live auction.

Alison Diamond and Ron Salter served as event co-chairs.


Moshe Willner addresses the IEEE Photonics Conference. Courtesy of Yeshiva University Los Angeles.

Spending the summer cooped up in a science lab paid off for YULA Boys High School student Moshe Willner. This month, the high school senior was invited to appear at the IEEE Photonics Conference, an annual symposium that draws leading scientists and engineers in light and optics, held in Bellevue, Wash., after a paper he worked on was accepted by the conference.

During his 10-minute presentation, Willner discussed how light sends information. His talk drew from experiments he helped conduct while working at a lab at University of Southern California (USC) this past summer. 

“I loved the idea of discovering something new, something that doesn’t exist, that you can’t find in a textbook already,” Willner said in a statement. “Working in the lab doing research on optical engineering provided me with that exciting feeling of discovery.”

Willner knew little about photonics before spending the summer at USC, where his father, Alan Willner, works as a professor in the department of electrical engineering. 

Willner discovered that he’d been accepted into the conference — which took place from Sept. 8-12 — while building a sukkah with his classmates in preparation for this month’s holiday. It gave him only one day’s notice to make his way to Seattle.

At YULA, a Modern Orthodox high school, Willner is a member of his school’s varsity basketball team. YULA Head of School Rabbi Dov Emerson described him as a “hard-working student” and a “well-respected student leader.”

“Moshe truly represents the best of YULA,” Emerson said.


Moving and Shaking acknowledges accomplishments by members of the local Jewish community, including people who start new jobs, leave jobs, win awards and more, as well as local events that featured leaders from the Jewish and Israeli communities. Got a tip? E-mail it to ryant@jewishjournal.com.

Calendar September 21–27


SAT | SEP 21

“OY!”

Written with honesty, curiosity and humor by Hélène Cixous, “Oy” follows sisters Selma and Jenny as they return home to Paris after a trip to their German hometown to testify about the horrors they endured during the Holocaust. Based on the experiences of the playwright’s family members, the piece works to untangle the memories and emotions of a shared journey. Sat. 8 p.m. Through Oct. 20. $34.99 (general), $30 (students, seniors). The Actors’ Gang, 9070 Venice Blvd., Culver City. (310) 838-4264. SUN | SEP 22

“CROSSING MUSICAL BORDERS”

Forget melting pot — Los Angeles is a music pot. Presented in association with the “Jews in the Los Angeles Mosaic” exhibition, the Autry celebrates the mishmash that is the L.A. music scene. Christopher “Thes One” Portugal, a record producer and one half of the hip-hop group People Under the Stairs, leads a conversation about these cultural crossovers. Joined by Paul De Castro, California State University, Los Angeles, music professor; Japanese mariachi singer Junko Seki; and Otto Granillo, founder of the band KoTolan, it will truly be a musical mosaic. Sun. 2-4 p.m. $10 (general), $6 (students and seniors), $4 (ages 3-12), free (ages 3 and under, Autry members). The Autry National Center, 4700 Western Heritage Way, Los Angeles. (323) 667-2000. ” target=”_blank”>israeliamerican.org.


TUE | SEP 24

“THE SECOND HARVEST 2.0”

Innovate, strategize, make a difference. YALA, American Jewish World Service, Netiya and MAZON want to address hunger locally and globally. While Sukkot helps us celebrate the bounty we have, take an evening to consider those who have not. MAZON President and CEO Abby Leibman moderates a panel that guarantees some expert difference making with Paula Daniels, former chair of the Los Angeles Food Policy Council; Robert Egger, founder of the L.A. Kitchen; Rabbi Noah Farkas, founder of Netiya; and UCLA law professor Jonathan Zasloff. Kosher refreshments will be served. Must RSVP. Tue. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Jewish Federation of Greater Los Angeles, 6505 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (323) 761-8132. ” target=”_blank”>skirball.org.

“THE SUNSHINE BOYS”

The boys are back in town! Danny DeVito and Judd Hirsch star in the Neil Simon classic. The play tells the story of two aging vaudeville stars who reunite for a TV special years after a bad breakup. Directed by Thea Sharrock and co-starring Justin Bartha, it’s a funny production with a whole lotta heart. Tue. 8 p.m. Through Nov. 3. $40-$90. Ahmanson Theatre, 135 N. Grand Ave., downtown. (213) 628-2772. WED | SEP 25

A SPECIAL MORNING WITH RABBI NAOMI LEVY

Start your day in a strong way, ladies. The Nashuva founder and spiritual leader speaks on “A New Day, A New Way” during a morning of discussion, growth and transformation. Learn about yourself as women, professionals, mothers, wives, daughters and friends. With breakfast under the American Jewish University sukkah, it will be a very special, very spiritual morning indeed. Wed. 10 a.m. $25 (nonmembers), free (University Women members). American Jewish University, Familian Campus, 15600 Muholland Drive, Bel Air. (310) 440-1283. THU | SEP 26

BILLY CRYSTAL

Nothing is clearer than when it’s Billy Crystal clear. With the wit and heart we all love to love, Crystal’s new book, “Still Foolin’ ’Em: Where I’ve Been, Where I’m Going, and Where the Hell Are My Keys?” deftly monitors the absurdities and obstacles that come with aging. Whether you enjoy him as an Oscar host, as the voice of a certain animated monster or as Harry — he’s probably one of the closest friends you’ll have in a stranger. Thu. 7 p.m. Free. Barnes & Noble at The Grove, 189 The Grove Drive, Los Angeles. (323) 525-0270.

Calendar: September 14–20


MON | SEP 16

“THE JEWISH IMMIGRANT IN WORLD CINEMA”

It’s no secret: as a people, we wander. Lawrence Baron discusses the various migrations of Jews in world history and how global cinema has portrayed these movements. Author of “The Wandering View: Modern Jewish Experiences in World Cinema and Projecting the Holocaust Into the Present,” Baron knows a thing or two about Jews and movies. Film clips will be shown. Mon. 11 a.m. Free. Reserved seating. California State University, Northridge, 18111 Nordhoff St., Sierra Hall 268, Northridge. (818) 667-4724. ” target=”_blank”>vromansbookstore.com.


WED | SEP 18

SHARON OSBOURNE

Ahoy, me hearties! Join the “X Factor” judge and talk-show host on Erev Talk Like a Pirate Day as she signs her merry yarn for your wee pirates-in-training, “Mama Hook Knows Best: A Pirate Parent’s Favorite Fables.” Mama Hook, voiced by Osbourne on Disney Junior’s “Jake and the Never Land Pirates,” takes a swim down memory lane, recalling her adventures on the Never Sea and all the tales she shared with a young James Hook. Yaar! It’s gonna get piratey and playful! Wed. 7 pm. Free. Barnes & Noble at the Grove, 189 The Grove Drive, Los Angeles. (323) 525-0270. ” target=”_blank”>laprintmaking.com.


THU | SEP 19

AIMEE BENDER 

The best-selling author who brought you “The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake,” Bender reads from her new short-story collection, “The Color Master.” Whether it’s a tale of two sisters in Malaysia mending tigers or a woman marrying an ogre, Bender beautifully masters the layers and complexities of being ourselves. Thu. 7:30 p.m. Free. Skylight Books, 1818 N. Vermont Ave., Los Angeles. (323) 660-1175. FRI | SEP 20

“A SINGLE SHOT”

When hunter John Moon pulls the trigger on a lone deer, it singularly alters his life. Director David M. Rosenthal (“Janie Jones”) presents a backwoods thriller starring Sam Rockwell, William H. Macy and Jeffrey Wright. Screened at the 2013 Tribeca Film Festival, “A Single Shot” is the chilling tale of a man trying to survive a cat-and-mouse struggle. Fri. Various times. Laemmle NoHo 7, 5240 Lankershim Blvd., North Hollywood. (310) 478-3836. ” target=”_blank”>laemmle.com.

AMY SCHUMER

The brazen beauty takes the mic and will undoubtedly have a lot to say. Star of the hit Comedy Central series “Inside Amy Schumer,” the comedian is making her mark in the ever-growing world of independent funny females. With experience on Broadway, in films and writing for magazines, it’s becoming hard to miss her — so, don’t. Fri. 7 p.m. $51. The Wiltern, 3790 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (213) 388-1400. ” target=”_blank”>hollywood.improv.com.

Calendar Picks and Clicks: Aug. 31-Sept 6, 2013


SAT AUG 31

“BETWEEN DARKNESS AND LIGHT”

For Selichot this year, share in a unique experience of drama, prayer, music and meditation. Theatre Dybbuk, a modern theater group devoted to exploring Jewish myth, folklore and wisdom, joins with clergy to ring in the New Year with a dramatic reflection on life and the power of rebirth. There will be a pre-performance dessert reception at 7:30 p.m. Sat. 8 p.m. Free. No reservations needed. Valley Beth Shalom, 16739 Ventura Blvd., Encino. (818) 788-6000. “>templealiyah.org

“IT’S A MAD, MAD, MAD, MAD WORLD”

There’s lying, deceit and double-crossing — perfect for the weeks before Yom Kippur! Director Stanley Kramer leads the likes of Milton Berle, Sid Caesar, Phil Silvers, Edie Adams, Ethel Merman and more through a madcap cross-country romp to find a hefty amount of stolen bank loot under a “Big W.” The Aero Theatre screens a 70mm print of this epic all-star comedy film celebrating its 50th anniversary. Sat. 7:30 p.m. $11 (general), $9 (seniors and students), $7 (member). Aero Theatre, 1328 Montana Ave., Santa Monica. (310) 260-1528. SUN SEPT 1

“>thebroadstage.com.

“I HAVE LIVED A THOUSAND YEARS”

If memoirs could move, they might look a little like this. Based on the story of Livia Bitton-Jackson’s experience as a young girl living through the Holocaust, the Stretch Dance Company offers a moving, educational and realistic journey for audiences. With emotionally driven choreography, historically accurate set designs and an original score, we understand that thoughtful creativity is one response to unimaginable sorrow. Not appropriate for ages 12 and under. Sun. 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. $15 (general), $10 (student), free (survivors). Studio A Dance, 2306 Hyperion Ave., Los Angeles. MON SEPT 2

“FACES OF HOMELESSNESS”

Painting the unseen among us, Stuart Perlman illuminates stories and lives that may otherwise go unnoticed. Capturing more than 100 homeless on location at Venice Beach, Perlman’s exhibition combines the portraits with essays that tell the subjects’ stories, narratives detailing the problem of homelessness in Los Angeles and Jewish texts that speak to the issue. There will also be information letting the public know how they can get involved. Mon. Through Nov. 3. Regular synagogue hours. Valley Beth Shalom, 15739 Ventura Blvd., Encino. (818) 788-6000. vbs.org. For information on private docent-led tour, e-mail sylviabt@sbcglobal.net.


TUE SEPT 3

ISRAEL GENEALOGICAL RESEARCH ASSOCIATION

Who are you, anyway? The Jewish Genealogical Society of Los Angeles (JGSLA) invites you to learn about some of the roots they have unearthed. Garri Regev, president of the Israel Genealogical Research Association, will discuss her group’s activities in Israel and their new free online database, which includes material dating back to the Ottoman period. Also, learn about the newest developments in family history research from the recent International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies Conference. Tue. 7:30 p.m. $5 (general), Free (JGSLA members). Skirball Cultural Center, 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 440-4500. THU SEPT 5

“MUSIC BY GLASS-DANCE BY DIAVOLO”

Diavolo Dance Theater’s “Fluid Infinities,” the third and final installment of an L.A. Philharmonic-commissioned dance series, has arrived. Diavolo showcases their inventive physical structures and patterned acrobatics to Glass’ haunting “Symphony No. 3.” With one of the most influential and inspired composers of the late 20th century sourcing the sound for the choreography, this audience can have great expectations. Diavolo also brings its innovative movements to John Adams’ “The Chairman Dances” and Sergei Prokofiev’s “Romeo and Juliet Suite.” Thu. 8 p.m. $11.50-$114.50. Hollywood Bowl, 2301 N. Highland Ave., Los Angeles. (323) 850-2000.

High Holy Day services: Tashlich 2013


SAN FERNANDO AND CONEJO VALLEYS

OAK CANYON COMMUNITY PARK

Temple Adat Elohim. Sept 5. 4:30 p.m. Oak Canyon Community Park, 5600 Hollytree Drive, Oak Park. (805) 497-7101. adatelohim.org.

LAKE BALBOA

Temple Judea. Sept. 6. Approximately 11:30 a.m. Lake Balboa, 6300 Balboa Blvd., Van Nuys. (818) 758-3800. templejudea.com.

CALABASAS LAKE

Shomrei Torah Synagogue and Temple Aliyah. Sept. 8. 11 a.m. 100 Civic Center Way, Calabasas. (818) 346-0811. shomreitorahsynagogue.org. templealiyah.org.

WEST HOLLYWOOD, HOLLYWOOD, AND EAST SIDE

MARSH PARK

East Side Jews. Down to the river we go. Be a part of the High Holiday transformative experience. Sept. 7. $40 (includes ritual, food and drink). 6:30-9:30 p.m. Marsh Park in Elysian Valley, 2960 Marsh St., Los Angeles. (323) 663-2255. eastsidejews.com.

WESTSIDE

SANTA MONICA BEACH

Beth Shir Shalom. Sept. 5. 3 p.m. (310) 453-3361. bethshirshalom.org.

Temple Isaiah. Sept. 5. 4 p.m. (310) 277-2772. templeisaiah.com.

Temple Israel of Hollywood. Sept. 5. 4 p.m. Meet at lifeguard station 12 ($12 parking at Lot 3 North). (323) 876-8330. tioh.org.

IKAR. Sept. 8. 4:30 p.m. Lifeguard station 26 (park at the beach just south of Ocean Park Blvd.). (323) 634-1870. ikar-la.org.

VENICE BEACH

Nashuva. Please dress casually in white and consider a sweater. Bring a percussion instrument and bread for throwing. Sept. 5. 5:30 p.m. Venice Beach (where Venice meets the sand; approximate address: 1 N. Venice Blvd., Venice). nashuva.com.

Beth Chayim Chadashim. Sept. 6. 4:30 p.m. Venice Beach, near the Fig Tree Restaurant (429 Ocean Front Walk, Venice). (323) 931-7023. bcc-la.org.

WILL ROGERS STATE BEACH

Leo Baeck Temple. Sept. 5. 5 p.m. Will Rogers State Beach (intersection of Pacific Coast Highway and Temescal Canyon Road). (310) 476-2861. leobaecktemple.org.

Temple Emanuel of Beverly Hills. Sept. 5. 5 p.m. Will Rogers State Beach (intersection of Pacific Coast Highway and Temescal Canyon Road). (310) 276-9776. tebh.org.

MARINA DEL REY

Bike ride to the beach. Temple Akiba. Sept. 8. 1 p.m. (meet at Temple Akiba). Temple Akiba, 5249 S. Sepulveda Blvd., Culver City. (310) 398-5783. templeakiba.net.

Moving and Shaking: Temple Adat Elohim names interim rabbi, Brooke Burke-Charvet honored


Rabbi Barry Diamond

Temple Adat Elohim (TAE) has named Southern California native Rabbi Barry Diamond as its interim rabbi. He replaces Rabbi Ted Riter, who ended his 16-year tenure at TAE in May.

Diamond, who grew up in Huntington Beach and Newport Beach, has served in several posts since his ordination at Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion, including time as interim rabbi in Houston, Texas, at Temple Sinai. He has worked as a part-time rabbi at Congregation Beth Shalom of Bryan/College Station, Texas, and spent 14 years leading the education programs at Temple Emanu-El in Dallas.

TAE, a Reform congregation in Thousand Oaks, announced Diamond’s appointment on July 5. A congregational meeting to approve Diamond was held on July 14. 


From left: Actress and model Brooke Burke-Charvet with Barbara Lazaroff, California Spirit co-founder and restaurant designer. Photo courtesy of Amy Williams

Last month, American actress and model Brooke Burke-Charvet was honored at the 29th California Spirit, an annual gala that raises funds for the American Cancer Society.

During the July 28 event, which was held at the Pacific Design Center in West Hollywood, Burke received the Inspiration Award. In 2012, the multifaceted performer who co-hosts “Dancing With the Stars” shocked fans when she announced that she had been diagnosed with thyroid cancer. That same year, Burke’s cancer was successfully removed. 

Co-founded by film executive Sherry Lansing, restaurant designer Barbara Lazaroff and chef Wolfgang Puck, California Spirit features cuisine, wines, live entertainment and a live silent auction. Since 1984, it has raised millions of dollars in support of research, patient services, early detection and more at the American Cancer Society.

Former “Project Runway” contestant Nick Verreos presented the award to Burke. Additional honorees included John Shaffner, Joe Stewart, Dr. Philomena McAndrew and Dr. Solomon Hamburg.


Delegates of AJWS’ rabbinic trip to India included Rabbi Peter Levi (top row, standing), Rabbi Ron Li-Paz (top row, second from left) and Rabbi Sue Levi Elwell (top row, second from right). Photo by Ruth Messinger of AJWS.

Rabbis Ron Li-Paz, of Valley Outreach Synagogue, and Peter Levi, of Temple Beth El in Orange County, traveled to Lucknow, India, last month on a rabbinic delegation trip. 

American Jewish World Service (AJWS), an international humanitarian nonprofit led by activist Ruth Messinger, organized the trip, which provided the local clergy with the opportunity to join national Jewish leaders and volunteers in reflecting on connections between traditional Jewish teaching, service activities and human rights. It was AJWS’ fourth rabbinic delegation to visit somewhere aboard.

In total, 17 rabbis from across the country — including Rabbi Sue Levi Elwell, the Philadelphia-based founding director of the Los Angeles Jewish Feminist Center — participated in the 10-day excursion. It ended July 31.

“We are deeply gratified to have leaders of Rabbis Elwell, Levi and Li-Paz’s caliber as part of our rabbinic delegation to India,” said Messinger, president of AJWS, in a statement released prior to the trip. “Rabbi Elwell, Rabbi Levi and Rabbi Li-Paz, like the other rabbis traveling with us, are tremendous leaders not only in their synagogues and organizations, but also in their local communities.”

AJWS reports that it has sent more than 400 rabbis, rabbinic students and graduate students in Jewish communal programs on learning and service trips in the developing world since 2004. Upon returning home from these trips, delegates work with fellow alumni to form like-minded communities of Jews interested in global justice.  


Moving and Shaking acknowledges accomplishments by members of the local Jewish community, including people who start new jobs, leave jobs, win awards and more, as well as local events that featured leaders from the Jewish and Israeli communities. Got a tip? E-mail it to ryant@jewishjournal.com.

Calendar Picks and Clicks: Aug. 24-30, 2013


SAT AUG 24

FARED SHAFINURY

This Iranian-American knows a thing or two about uniting sounds. Along with his Texas-based ensemble, Shafinury creates music that not only denies geography, but also time. He combines Iranian, Indian, Mexican and Texan sounds with modern electronic beats and American folk/rock; pinpointing an exact origin might be a challenge — so just sit back and enjoy. Hosted by KCRW DJ Tom Schnabel. Sat. 8 p.m. Free. Grand Performances, 350 S. Grand Ave., downtown. (213) 687-2159. “>cinefamily.org.


SUN AUG 25

“>http://www.fordtheatres.org.

YIDDISH TANGO CLUB

When is the last time you got your Jewish Latin fix? It’s probably been too long. With international backgrounds, a youthful spirit and Latin influences, the Yiddish Tango Club covers lots of bases. Come groove to its contemporary interpretation of the traditional. Sun. Noon and 2 p.m. $10 (general), $7 (seniors, students, children over 12), $5 (ages 2-12), free (members, children under 2). Skirball Cultural Center, 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 440-4500. “>circlesocal.org.

HENRY JAGLOM

It’s a book signing and film screening all in one. Henry Jaglom — the indie director behind films like “Déjà Vu” and “Eating” — introduces a double feature of Orson Welles’ “Citizen Kane” and “The Magnificent Ambersons” and signs his new book, “My Lunches With Orson: Conversations Between Henry Jaglom and Orson Welles.” Get the inside scoop from a Welles confidante. Sun. 6:30 p.m. (book signing), 7:30 p.m. (screenings). $7-$11. Egyptian Theatre, 6712 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood. (323) 466-3456. “>meetup.com/S-KI-Jewish-Singles.


WED AUG 28

ROSH HASHANAH COOKING CLASS

Put on the apron and learn to cook dishes that will impress your guests! YALA and JCC Without Walls sponsor an evening of hands-on culinary instruction from a professional chef. Ages 25-40. 7 p.m. $50 per person. Sur La Table, The Farmers Market, 6333 W. Third St., Los Angeles. (323) 761-8247. “>israeliamerican.org.


THU AUG 29

DENDE & BAND

If your spirit needs lifting, look no further. Under the leadership of master percussionist Dende, this Afro-Brazilian band combines reggae, merengue and basically a lot of joy. A musician since age 14, Dende has honed his craft by playing with artists that range from Mongo Santamaria to David Byrne. KCRW’s Jeremy Sole will spin records in the courtyard starting at 7 p.m. Thu. 8 p.m. Free. Skirball Cultural Center, 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 440-4500.

Calendar: Itzhak Perlman, Honey Bee Day, Avi Buffalo, ‘The Diary’ and more


SAT | AUG 17

NATIONAL HONEY BEE DAY

With Rosh Hashanah just around the corner, let us pay tribute to the busy bees that have long contributed to our delicious New Year’s tradition. HoneyLove, an urban beekeeper group, celebrates honeybees with the 2013 theme “Beekeeping — Ask Me How to Get Started.” Who knows, maybe you’ll be making your own honey in 5774. Waggle Dance flash mob at 2 p.m. (practice video online). Sat. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. LUSH, 1404 Third Street Promenade, Santa Monica. (424) 625-8233. ” target=”_blank”>coeurage.org.  


MON | AUG 19

“DREAD IN THE LITERATURE OF THE ANONYMOUS”

Josh Shachar discusses and signs his new book. A resident of Los Angeles and Caesarea, Israel, Shachar makes sure his characters are never all in one place, either. Following three separate journeys — an Algerian immigrant, a woman of broken faith and a watchmaker imprisoned in a labor camp — Shachar reveals that however different our journeys are, we do all journey. Mon. 7 p.m. Free. Book Soup, 8818 Sunset Blvd., West Hollywood. (310) 659-3110. TUE | AUG 20

ITZHAK PERLMAN

” target=”_blank”>hollywoodbowl.com.

“DON’T LET DESTINY CONTROL YOUR FUTURE”

In case you were planning to, don’t! Rabbi Lawrence Keleman offers an inspiring lecture on taking the reins and showing destiny the door. A Harvard-educated professor of modern and medieval philosophy at Neve Yerushalayim, the Jerusalem College for Jewish Women’s Studies, Keleman is just the man to introduce you to your future. Tue. 7:30 p.m. (reception and hors d’oeuvres), 8:15 p.m. (lecture). $7 (advance), $10 (door).Nessah Synagogue, 142 S. Rexford Drive, Beverly Hills. (310) 273-2400. THU | AUG 22

COMMUNITY CELEBRATION CONCERT

Perhaps the only thing just as timeless as family is music. Join the Schoenberg family as they celebrate the bar mitzvah of one of their younger members by honoring two of their oldest. Both hailing from Austria, Arnold Schoenberg and Eric Zeisl spent their lives composing music and contributing to a deserved Jewish place in its history. Conductor Nick Strimple and the Los Angeles Zimriyah Chorale, along with organist Iain Farrington, will bring some of those important liturgical works to life. Reception follows. Thu. 7 p.m. Free. RSVP required. Sinai Temple, 10400 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 409-2033. ” target=”_blank”>thesmell.org.

MARIA MULDAUR AND THE CAMPBELL BROTHERS

It’s a bluesy, funky, gospel kind of night. With vocals from Grammy-winning Muldaur (best known for “Midnight at the Oasis”) and the impressive all-around musicianship from a family of Campbells, the Skirball offers up a world-premiere collaboration. If your foot isn’t tapping, we don’t want to hear about it. Thu. 8 p.m. Free. Skirball Cultural Center, 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 440-4500. ” target=”_blank”>toaks.org/cap

Calendar Picks and Clicks: Aug. 10-16, 2013


SAT AUG 10

MOSTLY KOSHER

Celebrate Jewish culture with Southern California-based klezmer band Mostly Kosher’s bandleader and singer Leeav Sofer and Janice “Rachele the Matchmaker” Mautner Markham on violin. They perform songs and stories from across the globe as part of the family series “Big!World!Fun!” at the Ford. Sat. 10 a.m. $5 (adults), free (ages 12 and younger). John Anson Ford Theatres, 2580 Cahuenga Blvd. E., Hollywood. (323) 461-3673. “>yicc.org.

“AN EVENING OF DANCE”

The Zev Yaroslavsky Signature Series continues with the Complexions Contemporary Ballet. Led by Dwight Rhoden and Desmond Richardson, Complexions troupe brings its athletic, lyrical, technically proficient and seasoned choreography and dancers to the Ford stage. The evening also includes local favorite Lula Washington Dance Theatre, a creative outlet for dancers in South Los Angeles. Sat. 8 p.m. $45-$85. John Anson Ford Theatres, 2580 Cahuenga Blvd. E., Hollywood. (323) 461-3673. TUE AUG 13

“ROMAN POLANSKI: A RETROSPECTIVE”

Sure, there is controversy, but Polanski is a prolific and influential filmmaker. James Greenberg, editor-in-chief of  DGA Quarterly, the journal of the Directors Guild of America, discusses and signs his new tribute to the man behind “Rosemary’s Baby,” “Chinatown” and “The Pianist” (to name a few). Documenting Polanski’s rich and varied career, this chronological retrospective features more than 250 images, including behind-the-scenes stills. Greenberg uniquely captures the five decades that Polanski has been a significant, complicated and distinctive voice. Tue. 7 p.m. Free. Book Soup, 8818 W. Sunset Blvd., West Hollywood. (310) 659-3110. “>jewishla.org/yala.


WED AUG 14

“THE HEALTHCARE MOVIE”

If you thought you knew everything there was to know about health care, think again. National Council of Jewish Women/Los Angeles (NCJW/LA) presents Laurie Simons’ and Terry Sterrenberg’s documentary on the right to get healthy. Narrated by Kiefer Sutherland, it chronicles the evolution of the health care systems in Canada and the United States. Now very different, these two countries once had systems that were essentially the same. The event also includes a panel with physicians and policy advocates Bill Honigman and Bob Vinetz. Wed. 11:30 a.m. Free. RSVP. NCJW/LA Council House, 543 N. Fairfax Ave., Los Angeles. (323) 852-8503. THU AUG 15

MAMAK KHADEM

The emotional and spiritual sounds of Persia are coming to the Skirball. With influences that stretch back to ancient times and musicians from Greek, Persian and Syrian traditions, Khadem’s concerts celebrate cultural diversity. You will also experience global instruments like the oud, tonbak, setar and kanun, turning your Thursday night into something rather exotic. Show up at 7:15 p.m. for the Kurdish and Azeri dance instruction. Thu. 8 p.m. Free. Skirball Cultural Center, 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 440-4500. “>jnf.org


FRI AUG 16

“>laemmle.com.

Calendar Picks and Clicks: Aug. 3-9, 2013


SUN AUG 4

“>ncjwla.org.

CALIFORNIA STRING QUARTET 

Coffee? Check. Cookies? Check. Concert? Check! The Music Guild presents the California String Quartet as part of its 2013 Summer Festival. Playing since 2002, these four artists hail from Hungary, Bulgaria, the former Soviet Union and Solana Beach. With two violins, a cello and a viola, this award-winning ensemble promises rich sounds, passion for the classics, and a warm and intimate performance. The program includes selections from Haydn, Mendelssohn and Beethoven. Sun. 3 p.m. $50 (general), $45 (seniors), $12 (full-time students), $7 (children, 17 and under). University Synagogue, 11960 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 558-3500. “>museumoftolerance.com.


MON AUG 5

PHISH

While it might not be your usual cantorial music resource, the band has had a long relationship with Hebrew and Judaism. Not only are Phish’s drum and bass players Jewish, the band as a whole has spent time covering and repurposing traditional Jewish songs. While we can’t promise you’ll hear “Avinu Malkeinu” or “Yerushalayim Shel Zahav,” we feel pretty confident that the evening will be an eclectic showcase of a veteran band. Mon. 7 p.m. $57-$74. Hollywood Bowl, 2301 N. Highland Ave., Hollywood. (323) 850-2000. THU AUG 8

THE DANIEL ROSENBOOM GROUP

JazzPOP and Creative Underground LA present Daniel Rosenboom. Trumpeter, improviser, composer and record producer, Rosenboom skillfully fuses genres and collaborates with peers to create sounds that feel both classic and innovative. Having founded the collective Creative Underground LA in 2013, Rosenboom is not just passionate about his music, but the art and expression of creative types throughout the city. Thu. 7:30 p.m. Free. Hammer Museum, 10899 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 443-7000. “>skirball.org.


FRI AUG 9

BEN GLEIB

“Saturday Night Live” is on hiatus for the summer, so we have to get our laughs somewhere else. Spend your evening at the Improv, where stand-up comedian, actor and TV host Ben Gleib performs. A roundtable regular on “Chelsea Lately” and a podcaster for the SModcast Network, Gleib guarantees a funny Friday and a medley of material. Ages 18 and over. Fri. 8 p.m. $15, plus two-item minimum. Hollywood Improv, 8162 Melrose Ave., Hollywood. (323) 651-2583. “>cinema.ucla.edu

Moving and Shaking: AJC gives 2013 Community Service Award, Taste of Summer raises $87,000


Rabbinic Leadership Institute graduates include Rabbis Denise Eger (second row, third from left), Ken Chasen (third row, third from right) and Stewart Vogel (front row, fourth from left). Rabbi Joshua Aaronson not pictured. Photo by Yonit Schiller

Rabbis Joshua Aaronson of Temple Judea in Tarzana, Ken Chasen of Leo Baeck Temple in Bel Air, Denise Eger of Congregation Kol Ami in West Hollywood and Stewart Vogel of Temple Aliyah in Woodland Hills were recently named senior rabbinic fellows at the Shalom Hartman Institute (SHI), following the rabbis’ completion of the institute’s Rabbinic Leadership Initiative.

The elite three-year program of study, reflection and professional development at SHI trains rabbis to transform Jewish life in North America. Participants spent a month each summer and a week each winter studying at the institute’s Jerusalem campus.

During a ceremony in Jerusalem on July 7, Yehuda Kurtzer, president of SHI of North America, praised the rabbis, calling them “teachers, students [and] visionaries.” Other speakers at the July gathering included MK Rabbi Dov Lipman of Israel’s Yesh Atid Party. 

Eger, who was among those in attendance, acknowledged the program’s rigorousness. “It wasn’t always so comfortable; we had to stretch,” she said.


Fred Stern. Photo by Michael Aurit

American Jewish Committee of Los Angeles (AJC) awarded Fred Stern its 2013 Community Service Award in June. Stern is on AJC’s national board of governors and the L.A. board of directors. 

The June 18 reception in honor of Stern, who works as a financial adviser to Morgan Stanley Smith Barney, took place at the Beverly Hills home of Debbie and Naty Saidoff. David Harris, executive director of AJC’s national office, delivered the evening’s keynote speech. More than 125 guests and AJC leaders attended.

AJC backers Madeline and Bruce Ramer co-hosted the event.


Tom Tugend

Steve Greenberg

The American Jewish Press Association has awarded Tom Tugend, Journal contributing editor, a first-place Simon Rockower Award for Excellence in Jewish Journalism for his feature story “A Legacy in Harmony,” published by Hadassah Magazine, and a first-place Rockower to Steve Greenberg, Journal editorial cartoonist, for “Greenberg’s View.”

Tugend’s article described how Ruth and Judea Pearl have turned their private grief into public good in the decade since their son, Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl, was kidnapped and murdered by Islamic extremists in Pakistan.

Meanwhile, Greenberg’s winning cartoons skewered 2012 former presidential candidate Mitt Romney’s desire to win the Jewish vote, former Iranian president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s anti-Israel rhetoric and the international community’s response to Israeli actions in the Gaza Strip. 


Fulfillment Fund Leadership Council member Todd Hawkins with chef Eric Greenspan, honorary event co-chair. Photo by Matt Sayles, Invision Agency by The Associated Press.

The second annual Taste of Summer, a food, wine and beer festival held at the Annenberg Community Beach House in Santa Monica on July 13, raised $87,000 for the Fulfillment Fund.

The college-access organization makes college “a reality for students growing up in educationally and economically under-resourced communities,” according to the Fulfillment Fund Web site.

Chef and Fulfillment Fund honorary chair Eric Greenspan co-hosted the gathering. Known for his cooking at The Foundry on Melrose and The Roof on Wilshire, Greenspan expressed support for the Fulfillment Fund in a statement: “I’ve always viewed my most cherished and important role as a chef is to be a teacher, so education is very important to me.”

Vendors included The Roof on Wilshire, Wolfgang Puck Catering, Whole Foods, Stone Brewing and others.

During the event, more than 400 attendees enjoyed bites, drink, music and silent auction – all just footsteps away from the beach.


From left: Floyd Glen-Lambert, president of Jewish Labor Committee's western region; Assembly Speaker Emeritus and honoree Bob Hertzberg and former City Controller Wendy Greuel. Photo by Beth Dubber.

The Jewish Labor Committee (JLC) Western Region’s annual awards brunch held last month marked the 79th anniversary of the organization, as the national group’s New York headquarters and Los Angeles office were established in 1934.

The event also honored Laphonza Butler, president of the Service Employees International Union-United Long Term Care Workers; Tom Walsh, president of Unite Here Local 11; and Assembly Speaker Emeritus Robert Hertzberg.

The July 14 ceremony in honor of JLC — which describes itself as the “Jewish voice in the labor movement, and the voice of the labor movement in the Jewish community” — took place at Loews Hollywood Hotel.

Butler, Walsh and Hertzberg received the Elinor Glenn Leadership Award, the Henry Fiering Union Advocacy Award and the Abe Levy Chaver Award, respectively.


Moving and Shaking acknowledges accomplishments by members of the local Jewish community, including people who start new jobs, leave jobs, win awards and more, as well as local events that featured leaders from the Jewish and Israeli communities. Got a tip? E-mail it to ryant@jewishjournal.com.

Calendar Picks and Clicks: July 27-Aug. 2


SAT JULY 27

“>pasadenaplayhouse.org.

MATT HAIMOVITZ

The rock ’n’ roll cellist brings something edgy to an outdoor summer evening during “Moving Pictures With Matt Haimovitz,” presented as part of MUSE/IQUE’s Summer of Sound. Israeli born and educated at Harvard and Juilliard, Haimovitz has a wealth of world experience and knowledge to share through his music, which features highlights from acclaimed film scores, classical music, rock and other genres. The program also includes “American Idol” finalist Allison Iraheta and a world-premiere composition by Peter Golub. Sat. 7:30 p.m. $35-$96. Caltech, 332 S. Michigan Ave., Pasadena. (626) 539-7089. “>cinema.ucla.edu.

IPALPITI FESTIVAL GRAND FINALE

The world just got a little bit smaller — and louder. The Ipalpiti Orchestra performs the final songs of its festival under the direction of Eduard Schmieder. Musicians from multiple countries, including Israel, Denmark, Romania and Germany, will play pieces by Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach, Anton Webern, Marc-Olivier Dupin and Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky. Let’s send them off with a nice farewell. Sat. 8 p.m. $24-$120. Walt Disney Concert Hall, 111 S. Grand Ave., downtown. (310) 205-0511. MON JULY 29

KLEZFEST “J.A.M. SESSION”

The Los Angeles Jewish Symphony is bringing Eastern Europe to you in its second annual klezmer music celebration. It’s all-inclusive, so bring an instrument or some dancing shoes, because the stage belongs to you, too. And if you’re a little nervous about dancing, don’t be. Yiddish dance master Bruce Bierman will lead the way. Mon. 7 p.m. Free (reservations required). Ford Amphitheatre, 2580 Cahuenga Blvd. E., Los Angeles. (323) 461-3673. THU AUG 1

SHYE BEN-TZUR

The acclaimed Israeli composer, producer and performer resets Hebrew prayers and poetry to Indian devotional music. Blending international and personal influences, Ben-Tzur’s West Coast premiere showcases exactly what it means to cross political and religious boundaries. Part of the Skirball Sunset Concert series. Thu. 8 p.m. Free. Skirball Cultural Center, 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 440-4500. FRI AUG 2

SHABBAT IN THE PARK

Spice up your Shabbat tradition with an outdoor escape. The Jewish Federation Valley Alliance, Shalom Institute and various Valley synagogues are partnering for a special Shabbat evening. Led by a medley of clergy, you won’t be wanting for a sense of community. The festivities include arts and crafts, a drum circle and social action projects. Bring a picnic dinner and stay for the after-service concert with family-friendly songs. Fri. 5 p.m. (activities), 6:15 p.m. (service). Free. Warner Center Park, 5800 Topanga Canyon Blvd., Woodland Hills. (818) 668-2336. “>thenohoartscenter.com.

“THE GARDENER”

Father and son collaborate to create this poetic exploration of religion, specifically the Baha’i faith, in these contemporary times. Iranian filmmaker Mohsen Makhmalbaf and his cinematographer son, Maysam, travel to Israel and follow a gardener from Papua New Guinea who shares who he is and why he has settled where he has. With different opinions and lots of questions, “The Gardner” opens up a dialogue about spirituality and family that will leave you in thoughtful reflection. Fri. Various times. $12-$15. Laemmle Music Hall, 9036 Wilshire Blvd., Beverly Hills. (310) 478-3836.