September 23, 2018

What’s Happening in Jewish L.A. April 27-May 1: Art Garfunkel, Cancer Risk Symposium

Art Garfunkel.

FRI APRIL 27
SHABBAT CLERGY TISCH

Join Rabbi Becky Hoffman and Cantor Noa Shaashua for Kol Tikvah’s friendly Shabbat Clergy Tisch (“tisch” is Yiddish for table and refers to a gathering of community and clergy around a Shabbat meal). 6–8:30 p.m. 6 p.m., Kabbalat Shabbat service; 6:30 p.m., dinner, stories, teachings and songs. RSVP required. $18 members; $36 guests. Free parking in the rear on Del Moreno Drive. Kol Tikvah, 20400 Ventura Blvd., Woodland Hills. (818) 348-0670. koltikvah.org.

SUN APRIL 29
ART GARFUNKEL

Art Garfunkel.

Fifty years after debuting as half of one of pop music’s most popular duos, Art Garfunkel, 76, will perform solo, reviving classics that he and Paul Simon recorded in the 1960s and 1970s. With keyboard and guitar backing, Garfunkel will bring back “The Sound of Silence” and “Bridge Over Troubled Water,” along with his solo hits, “Bright Eyes” and “All I Know.” 7:30 p.m. $99–$270. Walt Disney Concert Hall, 111 S. Grand Ave., Los Angeles. (844) 753-8364. laphil.com.

WALKING TO DEFEAT CANCER

Sharsheret (Hebrew for “Chain”), a national organization supporting Jewish women and families facing breast cancer and ovarian cancer, holds its monthly walk/run that welcomes survivors, family, friends and advocates. Runners and walkers divide into groups based on abilities. 9 a.m. Free. Pan Pacific Park, 7600 Beverly Blvd., Los Angeles. To RSVP, contact Jenna at jfields@sharsheret.org. (310) 409-2330. sharsheret.org.

ACROSS THE GENERATIONS

“Grandparent & Me — Israel” offers a fun morning of singing, crafts and interactive stories for boys and girls ages 2½ to 6 accompanied by a grandparent or other special person in their lives. Everyone is welcome. 10–11:30 a.m. $20 per family. American Jewish University’s Familian Campus, Burton Sperber Jewish Community Library. 15600 Mulholland Drive, Los Angeles. (310) 476-9777. aju.edu.

ART EXHIBITION

Drop by the IVAN Gallery for a reception celebrating an exhibition of works by Freda Nessim. The exhibition features paintings of deeply explored themes ranging from Judaic and biblical through current events, nature and life in Los Angeles. Through May 24. 1–5 p.m. Free and open to the public. IVAN Gallery, 2701 S. Robertson Blvd., Los Angeles. (323) 533-6021. facebook.com/ivanartgallery.

SAHBA MOTALLEBI

Sahba Motallebi.

Internationally renowned Iranian musician and songwriter Sahba Motallebi, a virtuoso on tar and setar, performs music of Persia accompanied by Naghmeh Farahmand. Presented by Adat Ari El and the Rose and Edward Engel Music Commission. Wine, cheese and artist reception, 3 p.m.; concert, 4 p.m. Reception, $15 (RSVP required). Concert, free. Adat Ari El, 12020 Burbank Blvd., Valley Village. (818) 766-9426. wp.adatariel.org.

AJRCA ANNUAL OPEN HOUSE

The Academy for Jewish Religion, California invites everyone interested in its programs to its annual open house. 11:30 a.m.–1:30 p.m., information session and Q-and-A. 1:45 p.m., visitors invited to attend a class. Digital open house, available via video conference, from 2–3 p.m. RSVP necessary for each at rfederman@ajrca.edu or (310) 903-7170. Academy for Jewish Religion, California, 574 Hilgard Ave., Los Angeles. (213) 844-4133. ajrca.edu.

SKIRBALL PUPPET FESTIVAL

Skirball Puppet Festival.

Celebrate the art of puppetry and the power of imagination at the Skirball’s annual puppet festival. This campuswide, daylong festival features new and classic tales told with a variety of puppets, live music and art making. Appearances by Bob Baker Marionette Theater, Animal Cracker Conspiracy, Leslie K. Gray and other puppeteers from around the country. Design your own puppet and join fellow festivalgoers and puppeteers for the festival finale. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. The event is included with the cost of admission. $12 general; $9 seniors, full-time students and children over 12; $7 children 2–12. Free for children under 2. Only walk-up tickets available. Skirball Cultural Center, 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 440-4500. skirball.org.

TASTING L.A. JEWISH MUSIC

Demonstrating the uniqueness of local Jewish sounds, musicians Julie Silver, the Nefesh Band, Hillel Tigay and Friends, and Temple Emanuel of Beverly Hills Cantor Lizzie Weiss and Rabbi Jonathan Aaron perform “Shir Joy: A Taste of Los Angeles Jewish Music.” The concert concludes Jewish Wisdom and Wellness, a two-week-long festival of learning examining Jewish traditions and their impact on well-being. 5:30–7:30 p.m. Free. Temple Emanuel of Beverly Hills, 8844 Burton Way, Beverly Hills. (310) 288-3737. jewishwisdomandwellness.org

BERNSTEIN AT 100/ISRAEL AT 70

The Los Angeles Jewish Symphony and its conductor, Noreen Green, perform Jewish-themed compositions by the late Leonard Bernstein in a double birthday celebration: “Bernstein at 100/Israel at 70.” The charismatic Bernstein, remembered for making classical music accessible to the masses, was born in 1918 and died in 1990. In honor of Israel’s upcoming 70th birthday, the program includes the symphonic poem, “Emek,” by Israeli composer Mark Lavry, and the world premiere of composer Maria Newman’s “The Baton of Hope,” featuring mezzo-soprano Diana Tash and narrators Laraine Newman and Fred Melamed. 7 p.m. $25 reserved seating, $40 preferred seating with reception. American Jewish University, 15600 Mulholland Drive, Los Angeles. (310) 440-1238. aju.edu.

MON APRIL 30
SONGS OF MORDECHAI GEBIRTIG

Renowned Los Angeles Yiddish folksinger Cindy Paley and the Golden State Klezmers perform Yiddish folksongs by Mordechai Gebirtig, one of the most influential Yiddish troubadours in pre-World War II Poland. Gebirtig, who was killed by the Nazis during a roundup in the Krakow ghetto, wrote religious-flavored and secular reflections of daily Jewish working-class life. Paley, who has been delighting Jewish communities across the country for more than 30 years, performs along with accordionist Isaac Sadigursky, violinist Miamon Miller and clarinetist Zinovy Gord. 7 p.m. $18. Valley Beth Shalom, 15739 Ventura Blvd., Encino. (818) 621-8954. yiddish.brownpapertickets.com

TIMOTHY SNYDER

Historian Timothy Snyder discusses his latest book, “The Road to Unfreedom,” which examines the rise of populism and nationalism in Western Europe and the United States and argues that the discrediting of journalism, along with cyberwarfare across the globe and other strategies put forth by President Donald Trump and Russia’s Vladimir Putin are threatening democracy in the Western world. He appears in conversation with Jewish Journal book editor Jonathan Kirsch. 7:30 p.m. $20. Temple Emanuel of Beverly Hills, 8844 Burton Way, Beverly Hills. writersblocpresents.com.

TUE MAY 1
HEREDITARY CANCER RISK SYMPOSIUM 2018

A panel of experts provides powerful new information on medical challenges relating to cancer during “Hereditary Cancer Risk Symposium 2018: Arm Yourself With Knowledge.” Speakers are Dr. Susan Domcheck, director of the Basser Center for BRCA; medical oncologist Dr. Philomena McAndrew; gynecologic oncologist Dr. Beth Karlan; plastic surgeon Dr. Jay Orringer; Jenna Fields, director of Sharsheret; and author Jessica Queller. 6–7 p.m., cocktails and resource fair; 7–9 p.m., panel. Free. Temple Israel of Hollywood, 7300 Hollywood Blvd., Los Angeles. (323) 876-8330. tioh.org.

“HEATHER BOOTH: CHANGING THE WORLD”

Heather Booth.

The Los Angeles Jewish Film Festival holds the Los Angeles premiere of the 2017 documentary, “Heather Booth: Changing the World.” Director Lilly Rivlin’s inspiring film focuses on the renowned organizer and activist who began her career at the height of the civil rights movement. Through Booth’s life and work, the film explores pivotal, history-altering moments in progressive movements. Film is followed by a Q-and-A with Vivian Rothstein, a community organizer and founder of the Chicago Women’s Liberation Union, one of the first feminist organizations of the 1970s. 7 p.m. Free. $8 suggested donation. West Hollywood City Council Chambers, 625 San Vicente Blvd., West Hollywood. (213) 368-1661. lajfilmfest.org/film-selection-2018.

“I AM NOT A TRACTOR”

Susan Marquis, dean and distinguished chair of policy analysis of the Pardee RAND Graduate Program and author of “I Am Not a Tractor: How Florida Farmworkers Took on the Fast Food Giants and Won,” appears in conversation with Beit T’Shuvah board member Jon Esformes and Beit T’Shuvah Senior Rabbi Mark Borovitz. They discuss the formation of the Coalition of Immokalee Workers to improve conditions of workers on tomato farms, the historic development of the Fair Food Program, and the connection of both achievements to the teachings of Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel. A Q-and-A with the audience follows. 7–8:30 p.m. Free. Beit T’Shuvah, 8831 Venice Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 204-5200. beittshuvah.org.

Yom HaShoah Events, Supplies for Syria

Rabbi David Dalin.

SAT APRIL 7
“FLY”

Interfaith and multicultural teens confront their values, identity, gender and more in “Fly,” a new musical debuting at Temple Emanuel of Beverly Hills and the Pico Union Project, a multifaith cultural arts center and house of worship. An Art+Soul production directed by Stuart K. Robinson, the show is the culmination of months of exploration, creative thinking and rehearsing. April 7: 7:30 p.m. Free. Temple Emanuel of Beverly Hills, 8844 Burton Way, Beverly Hills. April 8: 3 p.m. Free. Pico Union Project, 1153 Valencia St., Los Angeles. (213) 915-0084. picounionproject.org.

SUN APRIL 8
“WHAT’S GOING ON WITH POLAND?”

Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett.

Professor Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, chief curator of the Core Exhibition at the POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews in Warsaw, discusses “What’s Going on With Poland?” The professor emerita of performance studies at New York University will address a controversial law passed by Poland’s government that criminalizes the suggestion that Poland was complicit in the Holocaust. Presented by the Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust and American Jewish Committee Los Angeles. 4 p.m. $15 advance purchase required. Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust, 100 The Grove Drive, Los Angeles. (323) 651-3704. lamoth.org.

“SILENT WITNESS”

Sinai Temple holds a communitywide Yom HaShoah program. Participants include children from the MATI Masa El Habagrut program, Alice and Nahum Lainer School, Israeli Scouts, Sinai Temple Cantor Marcus Feldman, Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust Executive Director Beth Kean and Holocaust survivor Dana Schwartz. 11 a.m. Free. Sinai Temple, 10400 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 474-1518. sinaitemple.org.

THE BIG FILL

As the civil war in Syria continues, and as part of a large-scale humanitarian effort dubbed “The Big Fill,” Jewish communities across Los Angeles have been collecting supplies to send to Syrian children under siege. Participants in the effort, including congregants of Stephen Wise Temple, IKAR, Temple Emanuel of Beverly Hills and Temple Judea, come together with the founders of Save the Syrian Children, a nonprofit dedicated to delivering medical supplies directly to Syrian hospitals, to sort and ship the supplies to Syria. Guest speakers are slated to appear. Wear comfortable clothes. 11 a.m.–2 p.m. Free. Temple Emanuel of Beverly Hills, 8844 Burton Way, Beverly Hills. RSVP at thebigfill.org.

POETRY AND MEMORY

Carine Topal.

In observance of National Poetry Month and Holocaust Memorial Day, the Skirball Cultural Center holds a live poetry reading featuring poet Carine Topal, reading from “In Order of Disappearance”; American Book Award winner Dorothy Barresi; and Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee John Densmore of The Doors. Suzanne Lummis, editor of Beyond Baroque Books and its Pacific Coast Poetry Series, hosts the program. A meet-and-greet reception with the authors follows the program. 2 p.m. $12 general, $8 Skirball members and full-time students. Skirball Cultural Center, 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 440-4500. skirball.org.

THE STORY OF THE KINDERTRANSPORT

A Holocaust Memorial Day commemoration program in the San Fernando Valley features stories of two children, Hilda Anker and Dave Lux, who were involved with and rescued in the historic World War II Kindertransport mission to save young Jews. Presented by The Mati Center, which seeks to build a united Israeli-American community. 3 p.m. Free. Valley Beth Shalom, 15739 Ventura Blvd., Encino. (818) 788-6000. vbs.org.

BULLETS AND BAGELS MOVIE NIGHT

Schmooze, nosh and learn about Israel’s original secret agent. Jewish shooting club Bullets and Bagels and the Long Beach Jewish Film Festival screen “The Mossad’s First, Reuven Shiloah,” a documentary about the Israeli intelligence agency’s first director, who served from 1949 to 1953. The film explores Shiloah’s contributions to the birth of Israel and his secret efforts to defend the Jewish state. The evening includes an appearance by Shiloah’s son, Dov, aka “Dubbie,” who will discuss Israel’s security. 6–9 p.m. $15 advance, $20 walk-ins. Alpert Jewish Community Center, 3801 E. Willow St., Long Beach. (562) 426-7601. bullets-bagels.com.

TEEN CENTER SEPHARDIC CULTURE NIGHT

Teens come together for a lively evening of music, food and schmoozing in celebration of Sephardic culture. Don’t miss this opportunity to make new friends and experience Arabic music, Middle Eastern food, backgammon, belly dancing and henna tattoos. Families welcome. 6–8 p.m. $20. Sinai Temple, 10400 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 474-1518. sinaitemple.org.

MON APRIL 9
“HOW SLAVE LABORERS SURVIVED”

Christopher Browning.

Drawing on the testimony of 292 slave labor survivors, Holocaust historian and USC Shoah Foundation Scholar-in-Residence Christopher Browning examines their survival strategies in a lecture titled, “Jewish Slave Labor and the Struggle for Survival,” which commemorates Yom HaShoah. The Holocaust historian will probe the various survival methods Jews experimented with in the Wierzbnik ghetto and the Starachowice factory slave labor camps in south-central Poland under Nazi occupation. 7:30 p.m. Free. Temple Beth Am, 1039 S. La Cienega Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 652-7353. tbala.org.

“ISRAEL AT 70: BEYOND THE HEADLINES”

Rabbi Avi Novis-Deutsch.

Promising to go “Beyond the Headlines” and talk about seldom-seen aspects of his country in a celebration of Israel’s 70th birthday, Rabbi Avi Novis-Deutsch discusses how Israel and Israelis are changing in the face of new challenges. A former educator at UC Berkeley, Novis-Deutsch is dean of Jerusalem’s Schechter Rabbinical Seminary, where he was ordained a Masorti rabbi 15 years ago. 7:45 p.m. Free. Shomrei Torah Synagogue, 7353 Valley Circle Blvd., West Hills. (818) 854-7650. stsonline.org.

ZIKARON BASALON

Holocaust survivors share their personal stories at intimate settings around the Los Angeles area. Organized by the Israel-American Council, the event, Zikaron Basalon — Hebrew for “memories in the living room” — takes place in advance of Yom Ha-Shoah, Holocaust Remembrance Day. 7 p.m. Free. Brentwood, Agoura Hills and Tarzana, with addresses provided upon registration. (818) 451-1201. israeliamerican.org/los-angeles/zikaron.

TUE APRIL 10
“JEWISH JUSTICES OF THE SUPREME COURT”

Rabbi David Dalin.

Fresh from his latest book, “Jewish Justices of the Supreme Court, from Brandeis to Kagan,” Jewish history scholar Rabbi David Dalin explores the lives and Jewishness of nine justices of the U.S. Supreme Court. He will talk about the historic appointment of Justice Louis Brandeis in 1916, which introduced the notion of a so-called Jewish seat. Dalin also will discuss the views of Justices Frankfurter, Cordozo, Goldberg, Fortas, Bader Ginsberg, Breyer and Kagan, and the role of anti-Semitism in their lives. 7:30 p.m. $15 Stephen Wise Temple members, $20 general. Stephen Wise Temple, 15500 Stephen S. Wise Drive, Los Angeles. (310) 476-8561. wisela.org.

“JUDAISM AND THE SELF”

Rabbi Shaul Magid, a senior research fellow at the Shalom Hartman Institute and a professor of Jewish studies at Indiana University, discusses “Judaism and the Self: Personal Dimensions of Jewish Identity.” He examines the relationship between internal Jewish life and external ritual performance, between Jewish ethics and physical human reality, and he explores how the American-Jewish experience has given rise to new possibilities for individual Jewish spirituality. The evening begins with a wine-and-cheese reception. 7:30 p.m. $15. American Jewish University, 15600 Mulholland Drive, Los Angeles. (310) 476-9777. wcce.aju.edu.

WED APRIL 11
FATHER PATRICK DESBOIS: “IN BROAD DAYLIGHT”

Father Patrick Debois.

Humanitarian and activist Father Patrick Desbois, founder of Yahad-In Unum, a global organization raising consciousness of the sites of Jewish and Roma (gypsy) mass extinctions by Nazi killing units in Eastern Europe during WWII, discusses his new book, “In Broad Daylight: The Secret Procedures Behind the Holocaust by Bullets.” The book, which documents mass killings in seven countries formerly part of the Soviet Union that were invaded by Nazi Germany, is a follow-up to Desbois’ National Jewish Book Award-winning book, “The Holocaust by Bullets.” Desbois will also sign his book. 7 p.m. Free. Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust, 100 S. The Grove Drive, Los Angeles. (323) 651-3704. lamoth.org.

YOM HASHOAH SERVICE AND FILM EXCERPT

Roberta Grossman.

In her documentary film “Who Will Write Our History,” producer and director Roberta Grossman examines an archive of 30,000 pages of material, including scholarly essays, poems, underground newspapers and more, providing an unfiltered record of Warsaw Jewry and the conditions of the Warsaw Ghetto. Marking the 75th anniversary of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising, an excerpt of the film screens at Temple Israel of Hollywood. A Q-and-A with Grossman follows. The evening also includes a Yom HaShoah service. 7–9 p.m. Free. Temple Israel of Hollywood, 7300 Hollywood Blvd., Los Angeles. (323) 876-8330. tioh.org.

THU APRIL 12
“THE RISE AND FALL OF MOSES, SERVANT OF GOD”

Temple Beth Am Rabbi Emeritus Joel Rembaum leads a class exploring the Torah accounts of Moses’ life journey. Through a close reading of selections of the Torah, participants will gain insights into Moses’ persona, his relationship with his people, his relationship with God and his impact on the generations that came after him. A reading knowledge of Hebrew is helpful but not required, as Hebrew/English texts of the Torah will be used. 7:30–9:30 p.m. Free. Temple Beth Am, 1039 S. La Cienega Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 652-7353. tbala.org.

What’s Happening in Jewish L.A. Mar. 31-April 5: Spago Seder, Nancy Spielberg and More

SAT MARCH 31
SPAGO SEDER

Spago Beverly Hills’ 34th annual seder serves up unleavened flatbread seasoned with shallot and thyme; homemade gefilte fish of whitefish, carp and pike; Judy Gethers’ matzo balls; and other items prepared by chef de cuisine Tetsu Yahagi. Meanwhile, executive pastry chef Della Gossert offers a menagerie of macaroons and macarons, fromage blanc cheesecake and more. Husband and wife Rabbi Arnold Rachlis and Cantor Ruti Braier of University Synagogue of Irvine lead services. The evening raises funds for Mazon: The Jewish Response to Hunger. 5:30 p.m. $195 per adult, $80 per child under 12. Spago, Beverly Hills. 176 N. Canon Drive, Beverly Hills. (310) 385-0880. exploretock.com/spagobeverlyhills.

“EXODUS SEDER CRAWL”

You’ve heard of a pub crawl? Venice spiritual community Open Temple holds “Exodus Seder Crawl: A Freedom Seder Experience Through Venice.” Instead of sitting at one table for the entire evening, attendees move from one table to the next on a quest driven by the Four Questions. Wear comfortable shoes and be prepared for surprises. 4-7 p.m. $36. The Open Temple, 1422 Electric Ave., Venice. (310) 821-1414. opentemple.org.

MALIBU SEDER

Join Malibu Jewish Center and Synagogue for an inspirational, communitywide seder, led by Rabbi Michael Schwartz and Cantor Marcelo Gindlin. The family-friendly evening features a fully catered, four-course meal; an English-Hebrew hagaddah; and traditional songs, stories and spiritual insights. 5-9 p.m. $60, adults; $20, children younger than 13. Malibu Jewish Center and Synagogue, 24855 Pacific Coast Highway, Malibu. (310) 456-2178. mjcs.org.

SILVERLAKE SEDER

The seder experience held at the Silverlake Independent Jewish Community Center revisits elements from its past seders, including a cocktail hour, with child care; a Beyond Bubbie’s Build-Your-Own-Charoset Bar; and a human tableau to tell the Passover story. In addition, an interactive art installation, Ruckus Roots’ “Freedom of Speech Wall,” provides a giant magnetic poetry wall on which participants can arrange words to express their thoughts or collaborate by building on an existing poem. The band Mostly Kosher performs live, and caterer Par Terre provides vegan, vegetarian and meat options. 5 p.m., cocktails; 6 p.m., seder; 7 p.m., dinner. $40, adults; $12, kids; free for children younger than 3. The Courtyard at Silverlake Independent Jewish Community Center, 1110 Bates Ave., Los Angeles. (323) 663-2255. sijcc.net.

SINAI TEMPLE SEDERS

Nicole Guzik (left) and Erez Sherman (right).

Sinai Temple husband-and-wife Rabbis Nicole Guzik and Erez Sherman and Cantor Lisa Peicott lead a community seder ideal for families and children. The kosher menu includes chicken marsala, grilled shiitake mushrooms and flowerless chocolate cake. A traditional seder plate and wine will be placed at each table. Simultaneously, 20- and 30-somethings come together for a traditional seder led by Sinai Temple Rabbi Jason Fruithandler. Organized by ATID, Sinai’s young professionals group, the evening is open to ages 21-39 only. Family seder, 6:30 p.m. $72, Sinai Temple members; $78, general admission; $45, children 12 and younger. Sinai Temple, Gold Hall, 10400 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 474-1518. sinaitemple.org. ATID seder, 6:30-9:30 p.m. $25–$45. Sinai Temple, 10400 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 474-1518. atidla.com.

SOME ENCHANTED PESACH SEDER

Historic congregation Hollywood Temple Beth El tells the Exodus story in song. Attendees sing along to parodies of songs from Stephen Sondheim, the Beatles, Disney, Adele and more. Enjoy a fabulous meal with friends at one of the oldest synagogues in Los Angeles. 7-11 p.m. $20-$80. Hollywood Temple Beth El, 1317 N. Crescent Heights Blvd., West Hollywood. (323) 656-3150. eventbrite.com

SECOND SEDER AT MISHKON

A catered kosher-for-Passover meal, plenty of wine, singing and even some games highlight the seder dinner at Santa Monica congregation Mishkon Tephilo, one of the oldest continuously operating synagogues on the Westside. 7:30 p.m. $30-$70. Mishkon Tephilo, 206 Main St., Venice. (310) 392-3029. mishkon.org.

TRIBE PESACH SEDER

Join IKAR young professionals group TRIBE for its third annual Passover seder. The kosher meal features options for those who eat kitniyot — legumes, grains and seeds — and those who do not. Dairy-free and gluten-free options are available. 8-10:30 p.m. $30. Habonim Dror, 8339 W. Third St., Los Angeles. (323) 634-1870. ikar-la.org.

TUE APRIL 3
ANNUAL WOMEN’S PASSOVER SEDER

Experience the seder through the eyes of women. The National Council of Jewish Women/Los Angeles (NCJW/LA) holds a kosher-for-Passover dinner celebrating prophetess Miriam, the sister of Moses and Aaron, and other women who are “passed over” in traditional Jewish conversations. 6-9 p.m. $45, NCJW/LA member; $55, general. NCJW/LA Council House, 343 N. Fairfax Ave., Los Angeles. (323) 651-2930. ncjwla.org.

THU APRIL 5
THE FORAGED SEDER

Rob Eshman.

Los Angeles forager, naturalist and self-styled “culinary alchemist” Pascal Baudar and “Foodaism” blogger and former Jewish Journal Editor-in-Chief Rob Eshman take a fresh look at Passover. With the flavors and themes of the holiday in mind, they discuss the array of plants that grow wild on hillsides, some having “migrated” from other countries and others native to California. Baudar will share samples of foraged greens to try, and Eshman will note which greens are relevant to Passover dishes. A light tasting of treats conceived by Baudar, Eshman and Skirball Chef Sean Sheridan follows. 8 p.m. $25, general; $15, Skirball members. Skirball Cultural Center, 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 440-4500. skirball.org.

SUN APRIL 1
JOKES FOR JEWS

Rachel Wolfson.

Stand-up comedy showcase “Jokes for Jews: April Shmuel’s Day” takes place on April Fools’ Day, which also happens to be Easter this year. Performers include Or Mash, Matt Kirshen, Jason Visenberg, Joshua Snyder and Rachel Wolfson. Texas comedian and Flappers regular Adam Feuerberg emcees. Interested in an interfaith comedic experience? The event immediately follows “Jokes for Muslims,” an evening of humor and hummus, beginning at 5 p.m. Jokes for Jews, 7 p.m. $20. Flappers Comedy Club, 102 E. Magnolia Blvd., Burbank. (818) 845-9721. flapperscomedy.com.

TUE APRIL 3
NANCY SPIELBERG

Writer-producer Nancy Spielberg joins Camp Ramah in Ojai for a kosher-for-Passover dinner, Q-and-A, movie screening and dessert reception. The Conservative Jewish summer camp will screen Spielberg’s 2015 film, “Above and Beyond,” about a group of Jewish-American pilots who flew for Israel in the country’s War of Independence. 5:30 p.m. $150. Zimmer Retreat and Conference Center at Camp Ramah, 385 Fairview Road, Ojai. RSVP required at teri@ramah.org. ramah.org/passover.

“REACHING ACROSS THE DIVIDE”

Spend an evening with the Sinai Temple’s Men’s Club as the organization screens a prerecorded debate from August 2017 featuring Sinai Temple Max Webb Senior Rabbi David Wolpe and conservative commentator Dennis Prager weighing in on the great issues of the day. Men and women welcome. 6:30-9 p.m. $10, general; Free, Sinai Temple members. Sinai Temple, 10400 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 474-1518. sinaitemple.org.

THU APRIL 5
COMMUNITY SEDER

The ChaiVillageLA community seder is a lively communal experience featuring a specially written hagaddah and Cantors Lizzie Weiss and Tifani Coyot. Members of ChaiVillageLA — a multigenerational, multisynagogue community that enables congregants to age in place as they grow old — as well as adult members of Temple Emanuel of Beverly Hills and Temple Isaiah are welcome. The theme of the evening is “Sharing Our Journey.” In the spirit of the Passover holiday, the organizers are collecting new clothing to donate to Syrian children in need. 6 p.m. $36. Temple Isaiah, Social Hall, 10345 W. Pico Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 277-2772. chaivillagela.org.

“500 YEARS”

Filmmaker Pamela Yates’ documentary “500 Years” follows the indigenous resistance movement in Guatemala and how a group of people committed to social justice stood up to power, racism and corruption to transform their country. The 2017 film, screening at the Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust, documents events that led Guatemala to a tipping point in its history, from a historic genocide trial to the overthrow of a president. A Q-and-A with members of the cast and crew follows the screening. 7 p.m. Free, RSVP required. Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust, 100 The Grove Drive, Los Angeles. (323) 651-3704. lamoth.org.

What’s Happening in Jewish L.A.: Table for Five Live, Klezmatics and More

FRI MARCH 23
THE KLEZMATICS FEATURING JOSHUA NELSON

The Klezmatics

The innovative klezmer ensemble performs music from its 2005 album, “Brother Moses Smote the Water.” Black and Jewish singer Joshua Nelson, a collaborator on that record, also appears. The result is a sonic collision of Jewish and gospel music and a musical exploration of what it is to be Jewish, Black and human today. 7:30 p.m., $65–$100. The Broad Stage, 1310 11th St., Santa Monica. (310) 434-3200. thebroad-stage.org.

RABBI ARI LAMM

Yeshiva University Special Adviser to the President Rabbi Ari Lamm discusses “The Future of Judaism: A Proposal,” at a reservations-only dinner at Pat’s Restaurant. The next day, Saturday, he discusses “Do We Talk Enough About Heresy?” before a reservations-only lunch at Pat’s. On Saturday evening, he explores “The Lost History of Mah Nishtanah: From Text to Archaeology,” a Passover-themed conversation. March 23: 5:40 p.m., mincha and kabbalat Shabbat; 6:50 p.m., dinner, by reservation only. March 24: Noon, lecture and Shabbat lunch, reservation-only; 7 p.m., Shabbat evening lecture. Dinner and lunch prices vary depending on party size. Young Israel of Century City, 9317 W. Pico Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 273-6954. yicc.org.

“BROADWAY SHABBAT”

Join Rabbi Becky Hoffman, Cantor Noa Shaashua and an ensemble of musicians for music from “Hamilton,” “The Lion King,” “Chicago” and other Broadway hit shows. Tap your feet, snap your fingers or sing along. Open seating. Mingling, coffee and sweets to follow. 6:30–7:30 p.m. Free. Free parking in the rear on Del Moreno Drive. Kol Tikvah, 20400 Ventura Blvd., Woodland Hills. (818) 348-0670. koltikvah.org.

“ISRAEL MATTERS SHABBAT SERVICE”

Rachel Ripps, the Synagogue Initiative deputy director for AIPAC’s Southern Pacific region, delivers an update from the 2018 AIPAC Policy Conference. Ripps works with communities from Southern California to Las Vegas and Arizona to develop and strengthen congregational pro-Israel activism. 7–8:30 p.m. Free. Kehillat Israel, 16019 W. Sunset Blvd., Pacific Palisades. (310) 459-2328. ourki.org.

“BLAZING SADDLES”

The 1974 irreverent comedy by writer-director Mel Brooks, which addresses issues of racism, colonialism and misogyny in the American West as reflected through the era when it was filmed, screens in conjunction with the “Richard Prince: Untitled (Cowboy)” exhibition at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA). The event features a conversation with director Jared Moshe (“The Ballad of Lefty Brown,” “Dead Man’s Burden”) after the film. All tickets available through LACMA’s box office and online ticketing system. Tickets $5–$10. 7:30 p.m. Bing Theater at LACMA, 5905 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (323) 857-6000. lacma.org.

SAT MARCH 24
WOMEN OF THE WALL SPEAKER

Cheryl Temkin

Cheryl Temkin, North American liaison for Women of the Wall, discusses the organization’s evolution. The group aims to secure the rights of women to pray at the Western Wall in Jerusalem in a fashion that includes reading from the Torah and wearing tallitot. 7:30 p.m. $15 donation. Temple Ahavat Shalom, 18200 Rinaldi Place, Northridge. (818) 360-2258. tassisterhood.weebly.com/wowevent.html

SUN MARCH 25
“TABLE FOR FIVE — LIVE”

Temple Emanuel of Beverly Hills Rabbi Emerita Laura Geller, Temple Beth Am Rabbi Adam Kligfeld, Open Temple Rabbi Lori Shapiro, Rabbi Eli Fink and Jewish Journal Publisher and Editor-in-Chief David Suissa discuss “Mysteries and Lessons of Passover,” a live-streamed, online conversation from the Jewish Journal studio. Co-sponsored by Limmud, the event is the first live edition of the Jewish Journal’s increasingly popular, multidenominational feature, “Table for Five,” which includes rabbis and others weighing in on the weekly Torah portion. 12:30 p.m. Free. Watch at jewishjournal.com/tableforfivelive.

WACKY PASSOVER FAMILY FUN DAY

Travel back in time to biblical Egypt and relive the Exodus at this family-friendly program at the Shalom Institute in Malibu. Kids will love hanging out with Norman the Cow and other animals at the Pinat Chai Animal Center and getting active with the giant swing, climbing wall and zip line. Also, they will learn what it was like for the Israelites to till the land when they try out the Shemesh Organic Farm. Additional activities include arts and crafts, nature hikes and a Passover singalong. 11 a.m.–3:30 p.m. $10, ages 7 and over. Free, ages 6 and under. Shalom Institute in Malibu, 34342 Mulholland Highway, Malibu. (818) 889-5500. shalominstitute.com.

SCALIA: “THE JUSTICE OF CONTRADICTIONS”

Richard Hasen

Professor Richard Hasen, chancellor’s professor of law and political science at UC Irvine, discusses his new book, “The Justice of Contradictions: Antonin Scalia and the Politics of Disruption,” with UC Berkeley School of Law Dean Erwin Chemerinsky. Hasen’s recently published book examines the complex legacy of the late Scalia, one of the most influential and controversial justices to serve on the U.S. Supreme Court. A lunchtime conversation for anyone interested in understanding the rightward shift of the highest court in the land. 12:30 p.m. Free. Los Angeles Central Library’s Mark Taper Auditorium, 630 W. Fifth St., Los Angeles. (213) 228-7500. lfla.org.

“VOICES OF OUR MOTHERS”

Lisa Peicott

Sinai Temple Cantor Lisa Peicott performs a solo recital celebrating Jewish songs and poetry created and inspired by women. A classically trained soprano, Peicott earned her undergraduate and master’s degrees in music from the UCLA Herb Alpert School of Music before entering cantorial studies at the Academy of Jewish Religion, California (AJRCA). Refreshments follow the concert, a partial fulfillment of the performer’s master’s degree in Jewish sacred music from AJRCA. 5–6 p.m. Free. Sinai Temple, 10400 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 474-1518. sinaitemple.org.

VLADIMIR FELTSMAN

Vladimir Feltsman

Russian-Jewish piano virtuoso Vladimir Feltsman and the American Youth Symphony, a group of accomplished young musicians from Los Angeles, perform Prokofiev’s “Piano Concerto No. 1.” Carlos Izcaray, music director of the American Youth Symphony, conducts the performance, which is part of the 2017-2018 Los Angeles Philharmonic’s “Sounds About Town” music series. 7:30 p.m. $15–$45. Walt Disney Concert Hall, 111 S. Grand Ave., Los Angeles. (323) 850-2000. laphil.com.

KIDS COOKING FOR PASSOVER

Kids ages 8 and older learn to cook for Passover with the Culinary Kids Academy, which educates children and young adults through cooking classes. The event begins with participants learning about the story of Nachson, the first person to jump in the Red Sea when the Israelites were fleeing from the Egyptians. The children learn how to follow in his footsteps to be the best they can be. Afterward, they prepare a delicious kosher-for-Passover breakfast. 1:30 p.m. $15 per family. American Jewish University, Familian Campus, 15600 Mulholland Drive, Los Angeles. (310) 440-1572. aju.edu/whizin.

What’s Happening in Jewish L.A. Mar. 16-23: Sephardic Judaism, Aliyah and Comedy Writing

Danny Ayalon

FRI MARCH 16
SALON SHABBAT

Gary Zola, executive director at the Jacob Rader Marcus Center of the American Jewish Archives, discusses “George Washington, Jews and the Story of Religious Freedom in America.” Zola is a celebrated historian and ordained rabbi who served under President Barack Obama on the Commission for the Preservation of American Heritage Abroad. 6-7:30 p.m. Free. Wilshire Boulevard Temple, Irmas Campus, 11661 W. Olympic Blvd., Los Angeles. (213) 388-2401. wbtla.org.

SAT MARCH 17
INFERTILITY AWARENESS SHABBAT

The third annual Infertility Awareness Shabbat raises awareness and sensitivity about infertility and unites Jews over a cause that affects 1 in 8 men and women throughout the Jewish community. Participating local synagogues — including Beth Jacob Congregation, IKAR, Pico Shul, Kehillat Israel, Congregation Mogen David, Congregation Shaarei Tefila, Temple Beth Am and Adas Torah — partner with Yesh Tikva, a Beverly Hills-based Jewish fertility community, to share a message or a dvar Torah for those who have not been blessed with children or struggle to expand their families. For more information, visit yeshtikva.org/infertility-awareness-shabbat-2018.

“ISRAEL-U.S. RELATIONS IN AN UNSTABLE WORLD”

Danny Ayalon

Former Israeli ambassador to the United States Danny Ayalon discusses the importance of the Israel-U.S. relationship in an increasingly unpredictable geopolitical landscape. Ayalon appears at the Beverly Hills Jewish Community following Saturday morning services. 9:30 a.m., Shabbat service; 11:30 a.m., lecture. Free. Beverly Hills Hotel, 9641 Sunset Blvd., Beverly Hills. (310) 276-4246. beverlyhillsjc.org.

RABBI MARC ANGEL

Rabbi Marc Angel

Rabbi Marc Angel, an advocate for classical Sephardic Judaism, author of 36
books and founder of jewishideas.org, discusses “Sephardic/Middle Eastern Jewish Voices: Addressing Contemporary Issues,” following Saturday services and a
Kiddush lunch. 8:30 a.m.-noon, Shabbat services; noon, Kiddush and lecture. Free. Sephardic Temple Tifereth Israel, 10500 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 475-7000. sephardictemple.org.

SUN MARCH 18
OPIUM MOON

Opium Moon

Master musicians Lili Haydn on violin and vocals, Hamid Saeidi on santoor (a Persian hammered dulcimer), MB Gordy on ancient percussion and Itai Disraeli on dub bass perform a family-friendly world music concert uniting musicians from Israel and Iran. American performance painter Norton Wisdom also appears. 7 p.m. $20. Temple Israel of Hollywood, 7300 Hollywood Blvd., Los Angeles. (323) 876-8330. tioh.org/arts.

NEFESH B’NEFESH ALIYAH FAIR

The 10th annual Nefesh B’Nefesh Aliyah Fair features workshops, lectures and personal consultations for those interested in making aliyah. Young professionals, retirees, married couples and singles enjoy this one-stop shop for all of their aliyah needs. Speakers offer professional guidance on a wide range of topics, including financial planning and budgeting for aliyah, choosing a community, how to build a strategic job search plan, navigating the health care system, the ins and outs of buying or renting a home in Israel, and more. 10 a.m., retirees and empty nesters; 11:30 a.m., general programming; 1 p.m., students and young professionals. Free. Shalhevet High School, 910 S. Fairfax Ave., Los Angeles. nbn.org.il/la2018.

TEHRANGELES 2018

The Iranian American Jewish organization 30 Years After redefines politics for the Iranian Jewish community during this daytime gathering at a private Beverly Hills home. Attendees enjoy a kosher brunch with mimosas as they explore what it means to be political in today’s dynamic and unpredictable times. U.S. Rep. Nanette Barragán (D-San Pedro) and state Sen. Henry Stern (D-Canoga Park) are the guest speakers. 10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. $25, early bird; $40, general. Address provided upon RSVP. 30yearsafter.org.

ALL ABILITIES FAIR

Join the Malibu Jewish Center and Synagogue for a family-friendly day serving people of all ages and abilities. Games, art, music, dance, resource tables and community service projects highlight the event, along with performances by The Miracle Project vocalists, the Kolot Tikvah Choir and two integrated wheelchair dance companies, Limitless and Infinite Flow. Noon-3:30 p.m. Free. Malibu Jewish Center and Synagogue, 24855 Pacific Coast Highway, Malibu. (310) 456-2178. mjcs.org.

GEORGE MITCHELL: “IMMIGRATION IN AMERICA”

Former U.S. Senate majority leader and U.S. special envoy to the Middle East George Mitchell discusses “Bans, Walls and Dreamers: Immigration in America.” Organized by Jews United for Democracy and Justice, a cross-section of L.A. Jewry. 7-9 p.m. Free. Leo Baeck Temple, 1300 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles. leobaecktemple.org.

MON MARCH 19
“CUBA’S FORGOTTEN JEWELS: A HAVEN IN HAVANA”

In the 1940s, Cuba admitted more than 6,000 Jewish refugees from Europe, including hundreds of skilled diamond cutters and their families, who turned the tropical island into one of the world’s major diamond-cutting centers for years. A new documentary, “Cuba’s Forgotten Jewels: A Haven in Havana,” features the personal accounts of some of those refugees, who recall their escape to Havana and the challenges they faced in an exotic and unfamiliar land. The 46-minute film has a soundtrack of Cuban and Jewish music. It is accompanied by “Bound for Nowhere: The St. Louis Episode,” a nine-minute short chronicling the ill-fated attempt in 1939 to save some 900 Jews, including 200 children, sailing from Europe aboard the German ocean liner MS St. Louis. Both Cuba and the United States refused to let the passengers disembark and the ship returned to Europe, where subsequently many of the refugees perished in the Holocaust. The two films will play in tandem at 7:30 p.m. at Laemmle’s Playhouse, Royal, Town Center and Claremont theaters. The same program will be repeated at 1 p.m. on March 20 at the same theaters. March 19: 7:30 p.m. $16, adults; $13, seniors, children. Playhouse 7, 673 E. Colorado Blvd., Pasadena. Royal, 11523 Santa Monica Blvd., Santa Monica. Town Center 5, 17200 Ventura Blvd., Encino. Claremont 5, 450 W.  Second St., Claremont. March 20: 1 p.m. $12, adults; $9, seniors, children. Same theaters. (310) 478-3836. laemmle.com.

TUE MARCH 20
L.A. RABBIS TEACH

Rabbi Daniel Bouskila, director of the Sephardic Educational Center, discusses “Voices from the East: Exploring the World of Sephardic Judaism.” He appears as part of a study series featuring five outstanding Los Angeles rabbis. The series concludes May 14 with Wilshire Boulevard Temple Senior Rabbi Steve Leder, who will examine “A Jewish View on Suffering and Transformation.” Bouskila’s lecture, 7:30-8:45 p.m., $10. Wilshire Boulevard Temple, 11611 W. Olympic Blvd., Los Angeles. (213) 388-2401. wbtla.org.

THU MARCH 22
*L.A. JEWS FOR REFUGEES ASSEMBLY

A coalition of Jewish congregations and organizations and the refugee assistance agency HIAS come together for this communitywide assembly. The event opens with an organizational fair featuring local and national refugee assistance organizations connecting participants to volunteer opportunities, advocacy initiatives and other ways to take action. Food cooked by refugees involved with Miry’s List, which aids newly arrived refugees, will be available. Students in grades 10-12 will have the opportunity to learn about voting from a Camp Gilboa representative. Elected officials, refugee speakers, policy experts and community leaders will address the assembly on policy updates, stories, ways to get involved and more. ID required. 6 p.m., food and information fair; 7 p.m., speakers. Free. Temple Beth Am, 1039 S. La Cienega Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 652-7353. hias.org/events/la-jews-refugees-assembly.

MULTIFAITH FORUM

A Los Angeles Police Department multifaith conversation addresses emerging community issues impacting the San Fernando Valley. Guest speakers are LAPD Counterterrorism Deputy Chief Horace Frank; Arik Greenberg, founder of the Institute for Religious Tolerance, Peace and Justice; and Elena Meloni, founder and executive director of the New Star Family Justice Center. Valley Beth Shalom Rabbi Noah Farkas delivers the invocation. Command staff of the San Fernando Valley LAPD will remain after the meeting to answer attendees’ questions. 6-8 p.m. Free. Valley Beth Shalom, 15739 Ventura Blvd., Encino. (818) 644-8140. ovbcomm@lapd.online.

NELL SCOVELL

Nell Scovell

In her new memoir, “Just the Funny Parts … And a Few Hard Truths About Sneaking into the Hollywood Boys’ Club,” television writer Nell Scovell delivers an insider’s account of working in the male-dominated writers’ rooms of “Late Night with David Letterman,” “The Simpsons” and other shows. She discusses her book with her colleagues Conan O’Brien and writer, producer and director Greg Daniels (“King of the Hill,” “The Office”). 8 p.m. $20. Skirball Cultural Center, 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles. writersblocpresents.com.

FRI MARCH 23
JNF BREAKFAST SIGNUP DEADLINE

Alon Ben-Gurion, grandson of Israel’s first prime minister, David Ben-Gurion, will be the guest speaker at the Jewish National Fund Breakfast for Israel, the theme of which is “Our History, Our Heritage, Our Homeland.” Ben-Gurion will speak about his hospitality consulting work, which includes using his extensive know-how and professional network to promote development in the Negev, working to realize his grandfather’s dream of making the desert bloom. Event registration deadline is March 23. The breakfast will take place on March 28, 7:30-9 a.m. Free; RSVP required. Warner Center Marriott, 21850 Oxnard St., Woodland Hills. (323) 964-1400, ext. 953. jnf.org.

What’s Happening in Jewish L.A. Mar. 9-15: Modern Orthodoxy, Sephardica and Unplugging

FRI MARCH 9
SHABBAT ACROSS AMERICA

Congregations Hollywood Temple Beth El, Hillel at UCLA, Congregation Kol Ami and Pacific Jewish Center celebrate Shabbat as part of the 22nd annual Shabbat Across America and Canada, a National Jewish Outreach Program initiative. Singles, couples, families and people of all ages are invited to the explanatory services, traditional rituals, delicious meals and lively discussions. Various times, prices and locations. For more information, call (646) 871-4444. For a full list of participating synagogues visit njop.org/programs/shabbat/saac.

UNPLUG L.A. | EASTSIDE

Jewish organizations Reboot and East Side Jews celebrate Shabbat at an off-the-grid, unplugged party, marking Reboot’s fifth annual, device-free commemoration of the National Day of Unplugging. Attendees check their phones at the door before enjoying an evening of live music, spoken word, storytelling, arts and crafts, food trucks and more. Performers include comedian Danny Lobell, spiritually charged band Bles’d, country-folk acoustic duo S+M, poet Rachel Kann, self-proclaimed pop culture guru Erika Brooks Adickman and actress Avital Ash. Writer and producer Jessie Rosen (“Sunday Night Sex Talks”) hosts. For ages 21 and older. 7–11 p.m. $18. The Box @ SIJCC, 1110 Bates Ave., Los Angeles. (323) 663-2255. sijcc.net/east-side-jews.

CHARLEMAGNE PALESTINE

Charlemagne Palestine

An installation by conceptual artist Charlemagne Palestine, born Chaim Moshe Tzadik Palestine, continues with his collection of 18,000 discarded stuffed animals. The orphaned plush bears, Disney characters and cuddly bunnies are a metaphor for the tens of thousands of refugees in the world today. Palestine, who began his career singing sacred Jewish music, brings a maximalist sensibility to this whimsical display. Through April 15. Wednesday–Sunday, 11 a.m.–6 p.m. Free. 356 Mission, 356 S. Mission Road, Los Angeles. (323) 609-3162. 356mission.com.

SAT MARCH 10
RABBI JOSEPH TELUSHKIN

Spiritual leader, scholar and author Rabbi Joseph Telushkin delivers the Saturday morning talk on the weekly Torah portion at modern Orthodox synagogue Young Israel of Century City (YICC). Telushkin’s rare local appearance is one of three he is making during his weekend-long visit to Los Angeles. On Saturday afternoon at Pat’s Restaurant, he participates in a luncheon discussion on “The 50 Best Jewish Jokes and What They Say about the Jews.” On Saturday night at a private Pico-Robertson residence, he discusses “The Rebbe: Teachings That Will Change Your Life.” Address provided upon RSVP at pvaldez@jnf.org or (323) 964-1400, ext. 958. YICC event: 9 a.m. Free, no RSVP required. Young Israel of Century City, 9317 W. Pico Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 273-6954. yicc.org. Saturday luncheon: 12:30 p.m. Pat’s Restaurant, 9233 W. Pico Blvd., Los Angeles. To RSVP and purchase tickets call YICC at (310) 273-6954. yicc.org.

“CROSSING OUR RED SEA”

Melanie Chartoff

Comedian Melanie Chartoff and actors Kate Zental, AJ Meijer and Tiffany Mualem stage a dozen original stories transforming the Passover story into contemporary Jewish women’s theater. The actors will perform the piece at six L.A. locations through March 26. An art exhibition of the same name, featuring 11 local female artists re-examining the Passover story through painting, sculpture, photography, textile design and ceramics, coincides with the opening night performance of the theater work. The exhibition runs through April 30. The free art talk with the curator and the artists begins at 7 p.m. Stay for the 8 p.m. salon show. Tickets are required for the performance. $40 presale, $45 at the door. The Braid, 2912 Colorado Ave., #102, Santa Monica. (310) 315-1400. jewishwomenstheeatre.org

SUN MARCH 11
“A SEPHARDIC ANTIQUE ROADSHOW”

The Sephardic experience and the history of Sephardic Los Angeles come alive during this show-and-tell event. Members of the public share their collections of Sephardica, including photographs, family albums, travel documents, family heirlooms and ritual objects, while archivists, rare-book experts and historians evaluate the meaning and importance of the materials. Participants will gain context surrounding their memories and family histories. Kosher refreshments provided. 2–4 p.m. Free. UCLA, Charles E. Young Research Library, Los Angeles. (310) 267-5327. uclasephardic.com.

MATZO BALL RUN

Promoting wellness, togetherness and community, the second annual Matzo Ball Run, a 5K run/walk, raises funds for local day school Harkham Hillel Hebrew Academy. Lace up those running shoes and turn out for this fitness-fun event, which also features a kids’ fun run for the little ones. A portion of the proceeds benefits Children’s Hospital Los Angeles. 6:30 a.m. onsite registration; 8 a.m. 5K run/walk; 9 a.m. kids’ fun run. $40 adults advance registration; $50 adults day of event; $30 kids’ fun run advance registration; $36 kids’ fun run day of event. Dockweiler State Beach, 12000 Vista Del Mar, Playa Del Rey. matzoballrun.com.

“ANTI-SEMITISM AND ISLAMOPHOBIA IN THE MIDDLE AGES AND TODAY”

Historians Sara Lipton and Hussein Fancy examine the fraught status of Jews and Muslims in Western Europe during the Middle Ages and discuss the often-entwined histories of these two groups, both of whom were cast as outsiders. Jihad Turk, president of the Claremont School of Theology, moderates the discussion, which sheds light on contemporary issues as well. The event is part of the temporary exhibition, “Outcasts: Prejudice and Persecution in the Medieval World,” which explores how medieval manuscripts’ caricature and polemical imagery can educate about historical prejudices against Jews and Muslims, among other groups. 3 p.m. Free. Getty Center, Harold M. Williams Auditorium, 1200 Getty Center Drive, Los Angeles. getty.edu.

KOL SEPHARDIC CHOIR AND FLAMENCO DANCERS

Celebrate Sephardic culture with Ladino music and flamenco dancers. Performers include Pasion Flamenca de Los Angeles, a contemporary flamenco fusion dance group, and flamenco and classical guitarist Adam del Monte. $25 general, $30 preferred seating. Temple Emanuel of Beverly Hills, 8844 Burton Way, Beverly Hills. brownpapertickets.com.

“ROADMAP JERUSALEM”

Filmmaker and Adat Shalom Rabbi Nolan Lebovitz screens “Roadmap Jerusalem,” a documentary exploring the connection between Jerusalem and the Jewish people. The short film examines the biblical, archaeological and political history of the holy city and argues for Israeli control. A Q-and-A with Lebovitz follows the premiere. 7 p.m. cocktail hour featuring Israeli wine, 7:45 p.m. film screening. Free. Adat Shalom, 3030 Westwood Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 475-4985. adatshalomla.org.

MON MARCH 12
“NO MORE ‘SAME-OLD’: A MIDEAST IMBUED WITH NEW ALLIANCES”

Felice and Michael Friedson of The Media Line, an American news agency dedicated to providing accurate and trustworthy fact-based news from the Middle East, discuss their first-hand experiences of accurately representing the most complex conflicts and countries in the world. The Friedsons have six decades of experience between them in TV, print and radio journalism and have propelled Media Line to become one of the most prolific providers of Middle Eastern news content to the region and the world. 7 p.m. Free. Beverly Hills private residence. Location provided upon RSVP to info@beverlyhillsjc.org (310) 276-4246. beverlyhillsjc.org.

TUE MARCH 13
“LA RAFLE (THE ROUNDUP)”

“La Rafle”

The 2010 film, “La Rafle,” recounts the true story of the infamous Vel’ d’Hiv Roundup of July 1942 in Paris, when the Nazis forced 13,000 Jews into an indoor velodrome before deporting them to Auschwitz. The film, screening at American Jewish University, focuses broadly on the Nazis and their collaborators, including the Vichy government and the French police. A post-screening discussion features writer-director Rose Bosch, historian Michael Berenbaum and Consul General of France in Los Angeles Christophe Lemoine. 7:30 p.m. $8. American Jewish University, 15600 Mulholland Drive, Los Angeles. (310) 476-9777. wcce.aju.edu.

WED MARCH 14
“UCLADINO SYMPOSIUM: NEW DIRECTIONS, OLD ROOTS”

The seventh annual ucLadino Judeo-Spanish Symposium focuses on themes and issues relating to new and up-and-coming topics and approaches within the study of Ladino and Sephardic life and culture. Panels and lectures explore current projects aimed at preserving, sharing and transmitting Ladino-related texts, music and archival material, including UCLA’s own Sephardic Archive Initiative. Hebrew University of Jerusalem Professor David Burns and St. Mary’s College of Maryland Latin-American History Associate Professor Adriana Brodsky deliver the keynote addresses. Through March 15. 10 a.m. Free. UCLA, Royce Hall 314, Los Angeles. (310) 267-5327. cjs.ucla.edu.

THU MARCH 15
“A CONVERSATION ABOUT MODERN ORTHODOXY”

Rabbi Dov Linser

Rabbi Jeremy Wieder

Rabbis Dov Linzer and Jeremy Wieder, leaders of Yeshivat Chovevei Torah Rabbinical School and the Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary, respectively, discuss “Between Values, Observance and Purpose: A Conversation About Modern Orthodoxy.” The panelists examine the complex dynamic in the Modern Orthodoxy community, where religious observance and religious values are both definitional to Jewish life. Moderated by Rabbi Ari Segal, head of school at Shalhevet High School. 7:45 p.m. Free. Beth Jacob Congregation, 9030 W. Olympic Blvd., Beverly Hills. (323) 930-9333. shalhevet.org.

“LAST GIRL BEFORE THE FREEWAY”
AUTHOR LESLIE BENNETTS

Leslie Bennetts

Best-selling author Leslie Bennetts discusses “Last Girl Before the Freeway: The Life, Loves, Losses and Liberation of Joan Rivers,” an intimate biography of the legendary comedian, an icon and role model to millions. Rivers set a precedent of honest femininity in public life,
never afraid to break barriers and push boundaries. Bennetts and journalist Tess Cutler unpack Rivers’ legacy. 7:30 p.m. $10. Burton Sperber Jewish Community Library, American Jewish University, 15600 Mulholland Drive, Los Angeles. (310) 476-9777. wcce.aju.edu.

What’s Happening in Jewish L.A. Mar. 2-8: Special Film, Comedy and Debates

Foxtrot

FRI MARCH 2
“FOXTROT”

Foxtrot

In the movie “Foxtrot,” Israeli director Samuel Maoz depicts the gut-wrenching grief, the overzealous mourning relatives, the well-meaning bureaucrats, and the downward spiral of depression and anger that come with losing a son in the military. Israel’s entry in the Oscar race for best foreign language film (which, ultimately, was not nominated) is a wrenching portrayal of parental grief, the joys and stresses of marriage, the boredom of army life and how Israel’s occupation policy humiliates the occupied and hardens the occupiers. The film opens at Laemmle’s Royal Theatre before expanding to additional screens on March 9. Various times. Friday-Sunday: $13, general; $10, seniors and children. Monday-Thursday: $12, general; $9, seniors and children. Laemmle’s Royal Theatre, 11523 Santa Monica Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 478-3836. laemmle.com.

FRIDAY NIGHT UNPLUGGED

Friday Night Unplugged

Friday Night Unplugged injects soul and meaning, through mindful meditation and a cappella prayers, into Shabbat services. Get into the zone for a meaningful and uplifting Friday night led by Rabbi Mendel Simons, director of Young Jewish Professionals of Los Angeles. A burgers-and-beer cocktail hour follows. 5:30-7:30 p.m. $10. The YJP Loft, 7122 Beverly Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 692-4190. yjplosangeles.com/unplug.

NEFESH SHABBAT

Nefesh Shabbat

Uplift the soul and experience Shabbat during this biweekly service led by Wilshire Boulevard Temple Rabbi Susan Goldberg and the WBT Nefesh band. Come early for a potluck at 6:30 p.m. and stay for the acoustic guitars and vocal harmonies. A musical, spiritual and community-oriented evening awaits. 7:30 p.m. Free. Wilshire Boulevard Temple, 3663 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (213) 835-2146. wbtla.org.

SUN MARCH 4
SUNDAY SYMPOSIUM

Rabbi Keara Stein, director of InterfaithFamily/LA, leads the final session of a four-part speaker series, “There’s Nothing New Under the Jewish Sun: A Look at Modern Issues Through a Jewish Lens.” The program has examined the hot-button topics of the day, including sexual harassment, fake news and the internet. 9-10:45 a.m. Free. The Studio @ SIJCC, 1110 Bates Ave., Los Angeles. (323) 663-2255. sijcc.net.

PURIM CARNIVAL

San Fernando Valley-based Temple Judea encourages the entire family to enjoy a day of festivities, featuring rides that are bigger and better than ever, including a Ferris wheel, zip line, giant slide, bouncy houses, obstacle course and Lego pit. Of course, no carnival would be complete without nosh, and this event serves up plenty, with hot dogs, burgers and cotton candy among the options. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Wristbands ($40 for unlimited rides and food) and tickets ($25 for 20) are available for purchase in advance or at the event. Temple Judea, 5429 Lindley Ave., Tarzana. (818) 758-3800. templejudea.com/purim.

WOMEN AGAINST GUN VIOLENCE

As the nation grapples with gun violence in schools and public spaces, Temple Isaiah holds a timely discussion with representatives of Women Against Gun Violence, which seeks stringent gun laws. The morning event will focus on how to talk to children about guns; how to keep children and communities safe; how to ask your family, friends and neighbors if they have guns and whether the guns are locked up; and what gun owners should know about locking up their guns. Light breakfast served. 9:30 a.m. Free. Temple Isaiah, 10345 W. Pico Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 277-2772. templeisaiah.com.

FIFTH ANNUAL OSCAR NIGHT AT KEHILLAT ISRAEL

Kehillat Israel marries Hollywood’s most glamorous night with tikkun olam. Guests are invited to watch the Academy Awards on the big screen while packing 1,500 lunches for homeless people. Don’t miss this “golden” opportunity to mingle, gossip about the winners and repair the world. Recommended for guests at least 8 years old. Free and open to the public. 5-9 p.m. Sign up to attend or sponsor at ourki.org. Kehillat Israel Social Hall, 16019 W. Sunset Blvd., Pacific Palisades. (310) 459-2328. ourki.org.

MARC MARON

Marc Maron

Jewish comedian Marc Maron headlines a special event that is sure to have audiences laughing out loud all night long. The veteran stand-up comic draws on 20 years of writing and performing experience, which includes conducting intimate interviews with iconic personalities on his hit podcast, “WTF With Marc Maron.” Don’t miss an opportunity to spend the night with one of the sharpest funnymen working today. For ages 18 and older only. 6 p.m., doors; 7 p.m., performance. $20. The Ice House, 24 N. Mentor Ave., Pasadena. (626) 577-1894. icehousecomedy.com.

MON MARCH 5
IMMIGRATION CONFERENCE

One LA, a coalition of faith-based organizations committed to social justice, including Temple Beth Am, Temple Emanuel of Beverly Hills and Temple Judea, holds a conference focused on the moral and economic framework for supporting immigration. 6-8 p.m. Free. Temple Emanuel of Beverly Hills, 8844 Burton Way, Beverly Hills. (310) 488-1167. onela-iaf.org/immigration_conference.

“JEWISH SOLDIERS IN BLUE & GRAY”

“Jewish Soldiers in Blue & Gray”

More than 10,000 Jewish soldiers fought in the Civil War, the nation’s deadliest war, which pitted brother against brother and Jew against Jew. The film “Jewish Soldiers in Blue & Gray” tells a remarkable history, including Gen. Ulysses S. Grant’s order expelling Jews from Kentucky, Tennessee and Mississippi; the rise of Sephardic Jew Judah P. Benjamin to secretary of state of the Confederacy; the imprisonment of Confederate spy Eugenia Levy Phillips; and the story of Abraham Lincoln’s Jewish doctor, who moved through the South as a Union spy. Sponsored by the Jewish Genealogical Society of the Conejo Valley and Ventura County. 7-9 p.m. Free. Temple Adat Elohim, 2420 E. Hillcrest Drive, Thousand Oaks. (818) 889-6616. jgscv.org.

“ELIE WIESEL: WHEN A DISSIDENT SETS THE AGENDA FOR ESTABLISHMENT”

Elie Wiesel

Elie Wiesel played many roles in his life: Holocaust survivor, activist, author, educator and Nobel laureate. Join scholar Michael Berenbaum as he discusses Wiesel as a dissident against Jewish passivity, indifference and complacency. Berenbaum will examine Wiesel’s early years and his dissidence that ultimately became part of the Jewish agenda. 7:30 p.m. $18. David Alan Shapiro Memorial Synagogue, 15600 Mulholland Drive, Bel Air. (310) 476-9777. aju.edu.

WED MARCH 7
“STORY TIME AT NOAH’S ARK”

“Story Time at Noah’s Ark”

Accompany your children to a one-of-a-kind, story-time experience. Listen as flood stories from cultures around the world are brought to life through the timeless tradition of oral storytelling. The program is presented weekly on Wednesdays at 2:30 p.m. $12, general; $7, children 2-12. Skirball Cultural Center, 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 440-4500. skirball.org.

ATID YOGA

Atid, Sinai Temple’s group for people in their 20s and 30s, holds an evening yoga class for all levels, from beginners to seasoned yogis. 7:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Sinai Temple, 10400 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 474-1518. atidla.com/calendar.

THU MARCH 8
“MENTAL ILLNESS AND CREATIVITY”

Ayelet Waldman

Kay Redfield Jamison, author of the 2017 book “Robert Lowell: Setting the Stone on Fire,” which illuminates the interplay of mania, depression and creativity, and Israeli-American author Ayelet Waldman discuss “Mental Illness and Creativity.” Waldman explored similar themes in her 2016 book, “A Really Good Day,” which told of the author’s experiments with small doses of LSD to brighten her mood. The two authors challenge the audience to think differently about a misunderstood condition. 7 p.m. Free, advance ticket required. Getty Center Harold M. Williams Auditorium, 1200 Getty Center Drive, Los Angeles. (310) 440-7300. getty.edu.

“JEWS, MUSIC AND MODERNITY IN BUENOS AIRES”

Lillian M. Wohl

Since 1994, “Jewish music” has emerged as an important yet ambiguous mode of cultural expression in Argentina, making audible Jewish history in Latin America and affirming a contemporary Jewish presence in the region. Lillian M. Wohl, the Lowell Milken Fund for American Jewish Music Post-Doctoral Fellow at UCLA, discusses the intersection of  cultural renewal and memory in Jewish music performed in public and private spaces in Buenos Aires. 4-5:30 p.m. Free. RSVP to cjsrsvp@humnet.ucla.edu. UCLA Faculty Center, 480 Charles E. Young Drive East, Los Angeles. (310) 267-5327. cjs.ucla.edu.

What’s Happening in Jewish L.A. Feb. 23- Mar. 1: Anne Frank’s Stepsister, Purim Events and More

Eva Schloss

FRI FEB 23
“THE FORBIDDEN CONVERSATION”

Gili Getz

Writer and actor Gili Getz performs his one-man, one-act play that explores the American-Jewish community’s difficulty with discussing Israel in an honest way. A former Israeli military photographer, Getz stages his performance as part of Avi Shabbat, a Shabbat dinner held on college campuses that honors the life of Avi Schaefer, who served in the Israeli army and was struck and killed by a drunken driver in 2010. A Shabbat dinner and discussion will follow the performance. 6 p.m. Free. Loyola Marymount University, St. Roberts Auditorium. (310) 568-6131. For additional information, email zachary.zysman@lmu.edu.

“MIRACLE SHABBAT”

The Miracle Project and Valley Beth Shalom/Temple Aliyah’s OurSpace Kolot Tikva Choir, under the direction of Chazzan Mike Stein and choir leader Shahar Weiner, present a musical collaboration of prayer and spirit in observance of Jewish Disability Awareness and Inclusion Month and Autism Awareness Month. Complimentary parking. Community dinner follows. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Elaine Breslow Institute at Beit T’Shuvah, 8847 Venice Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 204-5200. beittshuvah.org.

“HIP-HOP SHABBAT”

Temple Isaiah puts a contemporary spin on Shabbat with a service featuring hip-hop, R&B, electronic dance music, electric guitar and samples of music by Dr. Dre, the Fugees, Usher, P. Diddy and Sia. Temple Isaiah Rabbi Joel Nickerson, Cantor Tifani Coyot and songleader Danny Rubenstein lead the eclectic, high-energy and mind-expanding service. 6:45 p.m. Free. Temple Isaiah, 10345 W. Pico Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 277-2772. templeisaiah.com.

SUN FEB 25
AN EVENING WITH EVA SCHLOSS

Eva Schloss

Eva Schloss, a Holocaust survivor and stepsister of Anne Frank, discusses her wartime experiences and what we can learn from the past. Erin Gruwell, an educator focused on tolerance who inspired the film “Freedom Writers,” interviews Schloss. David Suissa, editor-in-chief of the Jewish Journal, emcees. Presented by the Jewish Journal, Jewish Community Center and Chabad of Downtown L.A. VIP reception 5 p.m., doors open 6 p.m., program 7 p.m. Students $10, general admission starts at $40. RSVP to nathan@miller-ink.com or meira@miller-ink.com or (310) 571-8264. Los Angeles Theater, 615 S. Broadway, Los Angeles. evaschloss.com.

RABBI AARON LERNER LECTURE

Rabbi Aaron Lerner discusses “The Present and Future of Jewish Life, Learning and Israel on Campus.” For the past five years, Lerner has helped expand Hillel UCLA’s leadership training program to include about 150 student leaders, who reach nearly 1,700 Jewish students annually at UCLA. Brunch 10 a.m., lecture 11 a.m., Q-and-A to follow. Free. RSVP at Kehillat Ma’arav office. Kehillat Ma’arav, 1715 21st St., Santa Monica. (310) 829-0566. km-synagogue.org.

“WHY HARRY MET SALLY”

Author Joshua Louis Moss discusses his 2017 book, “Why Harry Met Sally: Subversive Jewishness, Anglo-Christian Power and the Rhetoric of Modern Love,” with USC Cinema and Media Studies professor Michael Renov. The event is part of Casden Conversations, a scholarly initiative of the USC Casden Institute that brings together students, faculty and the greater Los Angeles community for discussions about Jewish life. Co-organized by IKAR. 4-5:30 p.m. Free. USC, Doheny Memorial Library, Room 240, 3550 Trousdale Parkway, Los Angeles. (213) 740-1744. dornsife.usc.edu/casden-institute/events.

MON FEB 26
AN EVENING WITH LARRY ELDER

Larry Elder

Author, radio talk show host and “The Sage From South Central” Larry Elder discusses “America in the Era of Trump” during a Jewish Republican Alliance event. Expect Elder’s take-no-prisoners style. 7:30–9:30 p.m. Advance tickets $18, tickets at the door $20. Valley Beth Shalom, 15739 Ventura Blvd., Encino. (805) 380-7721, ext. 701. jewishrepublicanalliance.org.

TUE FEB 27
“FACES OF AMERICA”

The Anti-Defamation League’s (ADL) Asian Jewish Initiative convenes “Faces of America: Immigrant Stories From the Diverse Asian Continent.” Panelists are Tabby Davoodi, co-founder of 30 Years After and a child refugee from post-revolutionary Iran; Halim Dhanidina, a Los Angeles County Superior Court judge and the first Muslim judge in California; Karen Korematsu, daughter of civil rights activist Fred Korematsu and founding executive director of the Fred T. Korematsu Institute; and Angela Oh, a mediator of civil rights cases and a second-generation Korean-American community advocate. ADL Regional Director Amanda Susskind moderates. A light dessert reception follows. Advance registration required. Registration 6:30 p.m., program 7 p.m. Free. Democracy Center at the Japanese American National Museum, 100 N. Central Ave., Los Angeles. (310) 446-4228. la.adl.org/event/faces-of-america.


Purim Events

SAT FEB 24
KOL AMI’S BEATLES PURIM

Rabbi Denise Eger and Congregation Kol Ami host a Beatles-themed Purim celebration, “Sgt. Esther’s Shushan Hearts Club Band.” The night begins with Havdalah and a free Persian dinner. Then, Kol Ami members and the house band retell the story of Purim through the music of the Beatles. All ages welcome. 7-10 p.m. Free. RSVP required for dinner. Email reception@kol-ami.org or call (323) 606-0996. Congregation Kol Ami, 1200 N. La Brea Ave., West Hollywood. kol-ami.org.

SUN FEB 25
STEPHEN WISE TEMPLE PURIM

A Stephen Wise Temple carnival for all ages features games, prizes, food, rides and costumes. Admission includes all rides and games. Food not included. 10:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Early bird tickets for kids 4–18 are $38; on Feb. 25, $50. Parents and kids 3 and younger admitted free. On Feb. 28, the synagogue holds an evening of music, dancing, food and schmoozing for grown-ups, featuring cocktails, appetizers and hors d’oeuvresataschen. 21-and-older only. RSVP required. 7 p.m. Free. Stephen Wise Temple, 500 Stephen S. Wise Drive, Los Angeles. (310) 476-8561. wisela.org/purim.

WED FEB 28
“THE ROCKY HORA PURIM SCHPIEL”

An interactive Megillah experience transports the Kehillat Ma’arav sanctuary into Mordechai’s Shushan. Attendees dress in their finest traditional Purim garb and costumes. A raffle fundraiser and dairy meal top off the festivities. 5:30 pm. $10. Kehillat Ma’arav Synagogue, 1715 21st St., Santa Monica. (310) 829-0566. km-synagogue.org.

“STRANGER PURIM”

IKAR invites you to its Justice Carnival and Purim celebration. Enjoy food, fellowship, a drink and a spiel. Costumes encouraged. Megillah reading 6:30 p.m., party 8:15 p.m. $15 in advance, $20 at the door (tickets not required for Megillah and spiel). Food and drink tickets separate, $5 to $15. Busby’s East, 5364 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (323) 634-1870.
ikar-la.org.

“SHE WILL ROCK YOU”

A 1970s rock-inspired musical mashup of the story of Esther and the songs of Queen lights up Temple Emanuel of Beverly Hills (TEBH). Rock out like a champion with fine wine and premier beer. TEBH and Temple Isaiah clergy participate in the spiel and Megillah reading. Cocktail hour and appetizers 7 p.m., spiel 8 p.m. Cocktail event $36. Temple Emanuel of Beverly Hills, 8844 Burton Way, Beverly Hills. (310) 288-3737. tebh.org.

PURIM AT PICO SHUL

Pico-Robertson congregation Pico Shul holds “Bluegrass, Moonshine, Mitzot and Megillah,” a Purim celebration featuring a speedy and fun Megillah reading. Yee-haw! Evening service 6:30 p.m., megillah and moonshine 7 p.m. Free. Pico Shul, 9116 Pico Blvd., Los Angeles. On March 1, after 10 a.m. services and an 11 a.m. Megillah reading, a Purim feast will be served at 5 p.m. Dinner $36. Pico Shul, 9116 Pico Blvd., Los Angeles. picoshul.org.

MISHKON TEPHILO PURIM

A Megillah reading at Mishkon Tephilo is followed by dinner and dancing. Comedian Jackie Tohn (“Glow,” “A Futile and Stupid Gesture”), poet Rachel Kann and DJ Jeremy participate. Bring your own beer. Doors and drinks 7:30 p.m. $10. Mishkon Tephilo, 206 Main St., Venice. (310) 392-3029. mishkon.org/purim.

THU MARCH 1
PURIM COMEDY AND SCREENING

Comedian and impersonator Michael Sherman tells the story of Al Jolson, a Jewish jazz singer who hid behind his identity by portraying an Old South minstrel masquerading in blackface. As with Purim, a true identity is hidden behind the persona. A screening of “The Jazz Singer,” the 1927 film starring Jolson, follows. 7-10 p.m. $8. Hollywood Temple Beth El, Sapper Hall, 1317 N. Crescent Heights Blvd., West Hollywood. (323) 656-3150. facebook.com/htbel.

What’s Happening in Jewish L.A. Feb. 16-22

FRI FEB 16
“LINCOLN AND THE JEWS”

On Presidents Day weekend, join Rabbi Lisa Edwards for coffee, dessert and a wide-ranging conversation about Abraham Lincoln’s relationship with Jews. Using as a guide the 2016 book “Lincoln and the Jews” by Jonathan Sarna and Benjamin Shapell, as well as other publications, Edwards will discuss the mutual affinity between Lincoln and Jews. Whether battling the anti-Jewish sentiment common in his time or insisting that there be Jewish chaplains for the first time in the U.S. military, America’s 16th president became known as a friend to Jews. 8-9 p.m. Free. Beth Chayim Chadashim, 6090 W. Pico Blvd., Los Angeles. (323) 931-7023. bcc-la.org.

SAT FEB 17
“JOACHIM PRINZ: I SHALL NOT BE SILENT”

Joachim Prinz was a young rabbi in Berlin who spoke out against the Nazis until he was expelled in 1937. After arriving in the United States, he witnessed racism against Blacks and realized the American ideal was not a reality. He became a leader in the civil rights movement and a friend and confidant of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. After the screening of a documentary on the rabbi, there will be a discussion with Rabbi Aryeh Cohen, professor of rabbinic literature at American Jewish University; Rev. D. Najuma Smith Pollard, founding pastor of Word of Encouragement Community Church; and Wolf Gruner, who holds the Shapell-Guerin Chair of Jewish studies at USC. 7:30 p.m. $12. Temple Beth Am, 1039 S. La Cienega Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 652-7353. tbala.org.

SUN FEB 18
MEET KNISH

Get ready to meet the hottest Jewish singles in Los Angeles. Queue up the jukebox. Kick back with a crafted cocktail. Dress to impress. From the team that presents the annual Christmas Eve MatzoBall. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. $30 general admission, $199 VIP annual membership. The Parlour Room, 6423 Yucca St., Los Angeles. eventbrite.com.

NOA

Noa

Achinoam Nini, known internationally as Noa, makes a rare Southern California concert appearance showcasing the most popular songs from her 26-year recording career, spanning 15 international albums and several Israeli releases, including her latest recording, “Love Medicine.” Selections will be sung in English, Hebrew and Arabic. One of Israel’s leading singer-songwriters, Noa wrote lyrics to and recorded the hit theme song for the 1998 Academy Award-winning film “Life Is Beautiful.” She sings in six languages and has collaborated with symphony orchestras around the world. She also is involved in the Israel Peace Initiative, Yalla Young Leaders and IsraAid. 7 p.m. $20 for Cal State Los Angeles students, staff and faculty; $25 for other students; $30, $40, $50 for others. The Luckman Fine Arts Complex, 5151 State University Drive, Los Angeles. (323) 343-6600. luckmanarts.org.

MON FEB 19
MANY VOICES, ONE SONG

Gindi Maimonides Academy celebrates its 50th anniversary with a Jewish music festival featuring Avraham Fried, Shlomi Shabat, Cantor Yitzchak Meir Helfgot, Baruch Levine, Simcha Leiner and a 60-piece orchestra. Food available for purchase during the show. Seating, other than VIP tickets, is first come, first served. Tickets start at $25. Doors open at 5:30 p.m., show at 6:30 p.m. The Wiltern, 3790 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 659-2456. maimonidesla.com

TUE FEB 20
“THE CHALLENGES OF TRUMP’S AMERICA”

Washington Post conservative columnist Jennifer Rubin discusses “The Challenges of Trump’s America: A Conservative’s View on Trump,” a conversation with former U.S. Congressman Mel Levine and former Los Angeles County Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky. 7:30 p.m. Free. Temple Israel of Hollywood, 7300 Hollywood Blvd., Los Angeles. (323) 876-8330. tioh.org/rsvp.

ILIZA SHLESINGER

The Jewish funny lady performs her irreverent brand of stand-up comedy, examining friendship, singlehood and relationships. 8 p.m. $25. Flappers Comedy Club, 102 E. Magnolia Blvd., Burbank. (818) 845-9721. flapperscomedy.com.

BARAK LURIE

Conservative radio show host Barak Lurie discusses “Atheism Kills,” his new, nonfiction book that attacks atheism and the dangers of a world without God. Lurie, who regularly speaks about politics and matters of God on KRLA-AM (870), is a member of many conservative and pro-Israel boards, including Prager U, StandWithUs, the Jewish National Fund and the American Freedom Alliance. 7:30-9:30 p.m. $18 presale, $25 door. IAC Shepher Community Center, 6530 Winnetka Ave., Woodland Hills. (818) 451-1201. israeliamerican.org/los-angeles/baraklurie.

WED FEB 21
FAREED ZAKARIA

Fareed Zakaria

CNN’s Fareed Zakaria delivers the 2018 Daniel Pearl Memorial Lecture, an annual event celebrating the life of the late journalist. The host of CNN’s “Fareed Zakaria GPS,” the network’s flagship international affairs program, is respected for his analysis, his ability to spot economic and political trends, and his good humor, wit and unique approach to international relations. Kal Raustiala, a professor at the UCLA School of Law and the UCLA International Institute, moderates. 4:30 p.m. $35. Schoenberg Hall, Room 1100, UCLA, 445 Charles E. Young Drive, Los Angeles. (310) 206-6365. tinyurl.com/pearlzakaria.

THU FEB 22
“AMY”

Amy Winehouse

Before her 2011 death from alcohol poisoning, Jewish singer-songwriter Amy Winehouse garnered critical acclaim for her vintage R&B-blues sound, jazz-influenced vocals and personal lyrics, as displayed on singles like “Rehab.” A screening of “Amy,” the Oscar-winning 2015 documentary about Winehouse’s brief life and career, features archival footage and personal testimonies. After the screening, Andy Besser, former executive director of the Jewish rehabilitation organization Beit T’Shuvah, leads a discussion. Popcorn and dessert served. 6:45 p.m. seating, 7 p.m. screening. Free. Kehillat Israel, 16019 W. Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 459-2328. ourki.org.

AYELET GUNDAR-GOSHEN

Acclaimed Israeli novelist Ayelet Gundar-Goshen discusses her latest thriller, “Waking Lions.” The book — winner of the 2017 Jewish Quarterly-Wingate Prize and one of The New York Times’ 100 Notable Books for 2017 — grapples with the influx of African migrants into Israel. Its story follows an Israeli doctor who, while driving one night, hits an Eritrean refugee and leaves him for dead on the side of the road. An exploration of the tension between the privileged and the unseen follows. 7:15 p.m. Free. UCLA Fowler Museum, Lenart Auditorium, 308 Charles E. Young Drive, Los Angeles. writersblocpresents.com/main/ayelet-gundar-goshen.

“BAD RABBI AND OTHER STRANGE BUT TRUE STORIES FROM THE YIDDISH PRESS”

Eddy Portnoy

Eddy Portnoy, who received his doctorate from the Jewish Theological Seminary with a dissertation on Yiddish cartoons, discusses his book, “Bad Rabbi,” an underground history of downwardly mobile Jews from the seamy underbellies of New York and Warsaw, the two major centers of Yiddish culture before World War II. The book features stories of drunks, thieves, murderers, wrestlers and poets plucked from Yiddish newspapers. Sarah Abrevaya Stein, a Sephardic studies professor at UCLA, moderates. The UCLA Klezmer Ensemble performs. 4-5:30 p.m. Free. 314 Royce Hall, UCLA, Los Angeles. (310) 267-5327. cjs.ucla.edu.

RABBI STEVE LEDER

Wilshire Boulevard Temple Senior Rabbi Steve Leder teaches about how to live a life worthy of one’s suffering as he discusses his latest book, “More Beautiful Than
Before: How Suffering Transforms Us,” with Sarah Brokaw, daughter of television journalist Tom Brokaw. The 2017 book guides readers through pain’s stages of surviving, healing and growing. Meanwhile, Leder draws on his years of experience counseling others through life’s difficult moments, including the death of a loved one, divorce or illness. Light bites and validated parking provided. 6-8 p.m. Free. Tower Cancer Research Foundation offices, 8767 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 401, Beverly Hills. RSVP required at brooke@towercancer.org or (310) 299-8470. towercancer.org/events.

AVRAHAM BURG

Avraham Burg, a prominent Israeli opinion maker, the son of a Holocaust survivor and former speaker of Israel’s legislature, has spent much of his life shaping Israel’s story. He discusses his new book, “In Days to Come: A New Hope for Israel,” which chronicles Israel’s highs and lows over the past five decades and weaves in his personal journey from a child in the world of religious Zionism to a paratrooper in the Israeli army, to the speaker of the Knesset. 6:30 p.m. VIP wine and cheese reception with the author, 7:30 p.m. lecture. $10 lecture only, $30 includes VIP reception. AmericanJewish University, Shapiro Synagogue, 15600 Mulholland Drive, Los Angeles. (310) 476-9777. aju.edu.

“PASSING THE TORCH — FROM SELMA TO TODAY”

Former U.S. United Nations Ambassador Andrew Young, Bernard Lafayette Jr. and Clarence B. Jones, three pivotal figures of the 1960s civil rights movement, along with James Perkins Jr., Selma’s first African-American mayor, and moderator Jessie Kornberg, president and CEO of the Jewish legal aid agency Bet Tzedek, discuss lessons learned from the civil rights movement. They reflect on how the Selma-to-Montgomery march and other key actions led to the Voting Rights Act of 1965, then consider strategies that can transform racist and unjust public policy today. 7:30 p.m. $12 general, $10 Skirball members and full-time students. Skirball Cultural Center, 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 440-4500. skirball.org.

TONY KUSHNER

Tony Kushner

The acclaimed Jewish playwright and screenwriter, who wrote the screenplay for Steven Spielberg’s Oscar-winning “Lincoln,” discusses “The Lincoln Legacy: The Man and His Presidency.” He appears in conversation with best-selling author Sarah Vowell as they examine the 16th U.S. president’s life’s work and legacy. 8 p.m. $29–$59. Royce Hall, UCLA, 340 Royce Drive, Los Angeles. (310) 825-2101. cap.ucla.edu

What’s Happening in Jewish L.A. Feb. 9-15

FRI FEB 9
INCLUSION SHABBAT

Join The Miracle Project and Nashuva for a special Shabbat service in honor of Jewish Disability Awareness and Inclusion Month. Individuals from The Miracle Project, a theater and expressive arts program for individuals with autism and developmental disabilities, will help co-lead Shabbat services at Nashuva, a spiritual community in Los Angeles. 6:30–9 p.m. Free. Brentwood Presbyterian Church, 12000 San Vicente Blvd., Los Angeles. nashuva.com.

CAROL LEIFER AND KEVIN POLLAK

Carol Leifer (left) and Kevin Pollak (right).

Comedians Carol Leifer and Kevin Pollak will unsheathe their rapierlike wits at the Hollywood Improv for what promises to be an evening of irreverent laughs. Leifer is a four-time Emmy nominee for her writing on “Seinfeld,” “The Larry Sanders Show” and the Academy Awards. Pollak began doing stand-up in San Francisco at age 20 and eventually became a regular on “The Tonight Show With Johnny Carson.” Pollak has some serious acting chops, too, with dozens of films to his name, including “A Few Good Men,” The Usual Suspects” and “Casino.” Music provided by writer, actor and multi-instrumentalist Wayne Federman. 18 and older. 7:30 p.m. doors open; 8 p.m. show. $15. Hollywood Improv, 8162 Melrose Ave., Los Angeles. (323) 651-2583. hollywood.improv.com.

BOOK OF J

Jewlia Eisenberg and Jeremiah Lockwood

Book of J — acoustic guitarist-singer Jeremiah Lockwood of the Sway Machinery and vocalist Jewlia Eisenberg of Charming Hostess — perform the duo’s self-titled debut album. Their folk-revival vibe draws on Yiddish songs of ghosts and police violence, American spirituals and piyyutim (paraliturgical songs) with a queer bent. Expect old-time religion, radical politics, diasporic languages, hard times resolved and destiny fulfilled — plus guests singing along. The “affecting West Coast duo … covers an expansive musical landscape,” The New Yorker wrote of the pair. 9 p.m. $8 full-time students, $10 members, $15 general admission. Skirball Cultural Center, 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 440-4500. skirball.org.

SAT FEB 10
KLEZMER AND BEYOND

Polish cantorial soloists Menachem Mirski and Avigail Geniusz perform klezmer and Yiddish music. On Saturday night, they appear at Beth Shir Shalom in Santa Monica. On Sunday night (Feb. 11), they perform at Congregation Beth Ohr in Studio City. Accompanying musicians include Yiddish folk singer and cantorial soloist Cindy Paley, clarinetist and accordionist Isaac Sadigursky, and clarinetist Zinovy Goro. Organized by Friends of Jewish Renewal in Poland. Proceeds benefit Progressive Jewish Life in Poland: Beit Polska. Saturday, 7:30 p.m. $18. Beth Shir Shalom, 1827 California Ave., Santa Monica. Sunday, 4 p.m. $18. Congregation Beth Ohr, 12355 Moorpark St., Studio City. (310) 286-9991. jewishrenewalinpoland.org.

’90s BAR MITZVAH DANCE PARTY — PART DEUX

East Side Jews, which calls itself “an irreverent, upstart nondenominational collective of Jews,” invites guests to enjoy all the magic of a 1990s-era bar mitzvah — without the adolescent awkwardness. What’s not to like? 8 p.m. $25. 21 and older. The Box in Silverlake, 1110 Bates Ave., Los Angeles. (323) 663-2255. sijcc.net/east-side-jews.

JEWISH SINGLES PARTY

Just in time for Valentine’s Day, a singles mixer organized by Persian-Jewish congregation Nessah features DJ Shaad E Shaad. Persian-style bread, cheese and wine served. Ages 35-55 welcome. ID required. 8:30 p.m. $20 presale, $30 door. Nessah Educational and Cultural Center, 142 S. Rexford Drive, Beverly Hills. (310) 273-2400. nessah.org.

SUN FEB 11
JEWISH WOMEN IN HOLLYWOOD: GAMECHANGERS

Celebrating women in Hollywood from Bette Midler to Gal Gadot, a Jewish Women’s Theatre performance and panel examine the evolving role of smart, talented, aggressive and influential women in Hollywood. The morning performance features actress Rena Strober depicting Hedy Lamarr, an Austrian-born actress whom Louis B. Mayer called the “the world’s most beautiful woman,” and who invented a radio guidance system for Allied torpedoes. The panel features four women working in Hollywood who discuss those who have broken the industry’s glass ceiling. 10 a.m.–noon. $20. The Braid, 2912 Colorado Ave., Suite 102, Santa Monica. (310) 315-1400. jewishwomenstheatre.org.

“COMING TO AMERICA”

Provoking tears and laughs, local writer and performer Stephanie Satie brings her topical one-woman show to Beth Chayim Chadashim (BCC). The show is about 10 women from different parts of the world whose lives have been transformed by their immigration to the United States. Satie shows how embracing life in America can be both liberating and daunting. A short Q-and-A follows. Beverages and Middle Eastern appetizers served. 2:30 p.m. doors, 3 p.m. show. $36 BCC members, $40 general, $50 VIP seating. Beth Chayim Chadashim, 6090 W. Pico Blvd., Los Angeles. (323) 931-7023. bcc-la.org.

THE JEWISH ARMY TO FIGHT HITLER

Author Rick Richman discusses his new book, “Racing Against History: The 1940 Campaign for a Jewish Army to Fight Hitler,” which presents the previously unknown story of how David Ben-Gurion, Zev Jabotinsky and Chaim Weizmann separately sought American support for a Jewish fight against Hitler. 4 p.m. $5. American Jewish University, 15600 Mulholland Drive, Los Angeles. (310) 440-1264. wcce.aju.edu.

“CASABLANCA” SCREENING AND DISCUSSION

Celebrated film historian Noah Isenberg discusses backstory secrets about one of the most beloved films of all time, “Casablanca,” including the central role that Jewish refugees from Hitler’s Europe played in its creation. He draws on extensive interviews with filmmakers, film critics and family members of the cast and crew. 4 p.m. Free. Wilshire Boulevard Temple, Irmas Campus, 11661 W. Olympic Blvd., Los Angeles. (213) 388-2401. wbtla.org.

“DRUNK IN LOVE”

The third annual “Drunk in Love” Valentine’s Day Jewish mixer and Midnight Mission fundraiser is an opportunity to meet a Valentine or a new friend, help the homeless and introduce yourself to professional matchmakers Jenny Apple Jacobs of Jenny Apple Matchmaking and Jessica Fass of Fass Pass to Love. Mingling, drinks and panoramic views from the 17th floor of the Angeleno Hotel highlight the evening. Bring items needed for donation to the Midnight Mission, including socks and hygiene products. A portion of the proceeds benefit Midnight Mission. All ages welcome. 6 p.m. $18. West Restaurant and Lounge, inside the Angeleno Hotel, 170 N. Church Lane, Los Angeles. eventbrite.com.

TUE FEB 13
“WHY STUDY JEWISH HISTORY?”

David N. Myers

David N. Myers discusses two of his recently published books. The first, “Jewish History: A Very Short Introduction” (Oxford University Press, 2017), offers a concise account of the entire course of Jewish history in 100 pages. The second, “The Stakes of History: On the Use and Abuse of Jewish History for Life” (Yale University Press, 2018), is an argument for the study of history, and especially Jewish history, as an anchor of memory and an indispensable ingredient for informed civic engagement. Myers is the incoming president and CEO of the Center for Jewish History in New York and is the Sady and Ludwig Kahn Professor of Jewish History at UCLA. Moderated by Todd Presner. Noon–1:30 p.m. UCLA Royce Hall, 10745 Dickson Court, Los Angeles. (310) 267-5327. cjs.ucla.edu.

“THE JEWISH COMMUNITY IN 2050”

Hebrew Union College–Jewish Institute of Religion professor Steven Windmueller explores the key factors that will shape American Jewish life for decades to come. 6:30 p.m. Free. Temple Beth Am, 1039 S. La Cienega Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 652-2384. tbala.org.

“JUDAISM AND THE SELF”

A three-part lecture series examines the relationship between internal Jewish life and external ritual performance, how a religious system relates to the embodied nature of the human condition and how the American-Jewish experience has given rise to new possibilities for individual spirituality. The series kicks off with Shalom Hartman Institute of North America faculty member Steve Greenberg. It continues April 10 with Shaul Magid, a research fellow at the Shalom Hartman Institute. It concludes May 8 with Elana Stein Hain, director of leadership education at Hartman. Participants will learn in small groups and pairs. Includes wine and cheese receptions. 7:30–9:30 p.m. $15 per session. American Jewish University, Familian Campus, 15600 Mulholland Drive, Bel Air. (212) 268-0300. hartman.org.il.

THU FEB 15
“LAND OF MILK AND FUNNY”

Avi Liberman

Don’t miss the Los Angeles premiere of local funnyman Avi Liberman’s documentary about America’s stand-up comedians discovering Israel. For years, Liberman has been bringing comedians to Israel on comedy tours to support families who lost loved ones to terrorism. The new film focuses on one of those tours. Featured comics include Wayne Federman, Ralph Farris, Brian Regan and Craig Robinson. 6 p.m. VIP dinner and meet-and-greet with comedians, 7 p.m. film. $25 general, $100 VIP dinner reception and meet-and-greet with comedians. The Writers Guild Theatre, 135 S. Doheny Drive, Beverly Hills. (213) 254-3162; standwithus.com/milkandfunny.

What’s Happening in Jewish L.A. Feb. 2-7: Intriguing Talks and Super Sunday Events

Barbara Grover

FRI FEB 2
“SHOAH: HOW WAS IT HUMANLY POSSIBLE?”

An art exhibition presented by the American Society for Yad Vashem and Sinai Temple, making its debut on the West Coast, offers a comprehensive history of the Holocaust from 1933-1945. Several sections of this exhibition recount major historical aspects of the Holocaust, including pre-Holocaust Europe, European anti-Semitism and Nazi policy before the outbreak of World War II, Jewish life under German occupation, industrialized exterminations and deportations, and the liberation of the concentration camps in 1945. The exhibition, introduced at the United Nations in 2015 for International Holocaust Remembrance Day, features text, images and video clips. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Free, RSVP required at stcommunications@sinaitemple.org. Sinai Temple, 10400 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (424) 273-4460.

INCLUSION SHABBAT

Congregation Or Ami in Calabasas marks February, which is Jewish Disability Awareness and Inclusion Month, with an inclusion Shabbat service open to those with disabilities and those without a place to worship or a community to call their own. Or Ami Rabbi Paul Kipnes, Cantor Doug Cotler and rabbinic intern Julie Bressler lead the service. 7:30-9 p.m. Free. Congregation Or Ami, 26115 Mureau Road, Suite B, Calabasas. (818) 880-4880. The service will be livestreamed at oramilive.org.

SAT FEB 3
RESTORATIVE SHABBAT YOGA

Yogis interested in infusing their practice with Jewish spirituality are encouraged to come to Adat Ari El for a Saturday morning restorative Shabbat yoga service. Bring your yoga mat. 9:30 a.m. Free. Adat Ari El, Adler Fabe Meeting Room, 12020 Burbank Blvd., Valley Village. (818) 766-9426. adatariel.org.

CIVIL RIGHTS ADVOCACY AND LITIGATION FOR JEWS

Brooke Goldstein, executive director of the Lawfare Project, the self-described “legal arm of the pro-Israel community,” discusses “Civil Rights Advocacy and Litigation for the Jewish People.” She appears after Shabbat services at the Beverly Hills Jewish Community. Limited seating, RSVP at info@beverlyhillsjc.org. 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Free. Beverly Hills Hotel, 9641 Sunset Blvd., Beverly Hills. (310) 276-4246. beverlyhillsjc.org.

L.A. CITY ATTORNEY MIKE FEUER

Mike Feuer

Los Angeles City Attorney Mike Feuer discusses public safety, criminal justice reform, gun safety and immigrants’ rights during lunch after IKAR’s Saturday Shabbat service as part of the egalitarian congregation’s “Know Your Reps” campaign. Noon-1:30 p.m. Free. IKAR, 910 S. Fairfax Ave., Los Angeles. (323) 634-1870. ikar-la.org.

“GOOD VIBRATIONS”

Have a groovy time with Cantors Ken Cohen of Temple Ahavat Shalom and Daniel Friedman of Temple Ramat Zion, both in Northridge, cantorial soloist Jackie Rafii of Shomrei Torah Synagogue in West Hills and musical theater vocalist Jennifer Bennett as they perform songs of courage, hope and love. Proceeds benefit Temple Ahavat Shalom programs and services. All tickets will-call, starting at $40. Will-call opens at 6:30 p.m., doors open at 7:10 p.m., concert starts at 7:30 p.m. Temple Ahavat Shalom, 18200 Rinaldi Place, Northridge. (818) 360-2258. tasnorthridge.org/concert.

SUN FEB 4
WORLD WIDE WRAP XVIII

On Super Bowl Sunday, more than 100 men’s clubs and congregations around the world teach the mitzvah of wrapping tefillin. Participating congregations include Sinai Temple, which hosts a breakfast in conjunction with the event; Temple Aliyah, which serves bagels and holds a drash after the wrap; and Temple Ramat Zion, which serves light refreshments afterward. Organized by the Federation of Jewish Men’s Clubs, an initiative of the Conservative/Masorti movement, the World Wide Wrap unites men, women and children in prayer. Free at all locations. 8:45 a.m., Sinai Temple, 10400 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 474-1518, ext. 3340, member.sinaitemple.org/events; 9 a.m.-noon, Temple Aliyah, 6025 Valley Circle Blvd., Woodland Hills. (818) 346-3545, templealiyah.org; and 9:30 a.m., Temple Ramat Zion, 17655 Devonshire St., Northridge. (818) 360-1881, trz.org.

KIDS CHALLAH BAKE

The second, nearly annual LA Kids Challah Bake comes to downtown Los Angeles. Boys and girls ages 2-13 will be provided with braiding tips and sufficient ingredients to make two challahs, one to take home and one to be donated to Jewish Family Service of Los Angeles. Co-hosted by Sarah Klegman, a writer and co-founder of Challah Hub, a local artisan challah delivery company, and Whitney Fisch, director of counseling at Milken Community School’s upper school campus and creator of the Jewhungry blog. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. $23 general admission; $50 VIP ticket includes valet parking, early access and check-in, swag bag and reserved seating. The Majestic Downtown, 650 S. Spring St., Los Angeles. lakidschallahbake@gmail.com. lakidschallahbake.com.

SUPER SOUL PARTY

Temple Beth Am, Accidental Talmudist’s Sal Litvak and motivational speaker Meir Kay throw a Super Bowl party for the homeless. Attendees watch the game together, eat and shmooze, and the organizers distribute dignity kits to the homeless. Volunteers are needed to arrange and help with the event, which will be filmed and shared on social media. Contact Lia Mandelbaum with questions at lmandelbaum@tbala.org. 1:30 p.m. Free. Temple Beth Am, 1039 S. La Cienega Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 652-2384. tbala.org.

“TO LOOK A NAZI IN THE EYE”

Kathy Kacer

Prolific children’s author Kathy Kacer, the daughter of survivors who writes about the Holocaust for children, collaborated with 19-year-old Jordana Lebowitz, the granddaughter of Holocaust survivors, to tell the fascinating, true story of Lebowitz’s experience attending the 2015 trial of Oskar Groening, known as the bookkeeper of Auschwitz. Their work, “To Look a Nazi in the Eye: A Teen’s Account of a War Criminal Trial,” was published in 2017. Kacer and Lebowitz take part in a discussion and book signing co-presented by the Consulate General of Canada and the Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust. 3 p.m. Free. Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust, 100 The Grove Drive, Los Angeles. (323) 651-3704. lamoth.org. Kacer and Lebowitz also appear on Feb. 6 at the Museum of Tolerance, for school groups in ninth grade through college. 12:30 p.m. Free. Advance registration required. Museum of Tolerance, 9786 W. Pico Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 772-2505. museumoftolerance.com.

MON FEB 5
THIS IS HUNGER

Barbara Grover

Photojournalist Barbara Grover provides an intimate and surprising portrait of hunger in the United States in a multimedia touring exhibition, “MAZON: A Jewish Response to Hunger.” Featuring portraits and first-person narratives of individuals suffering from food insecurity, including people serving in the military and their families, the exhibition is displayed inside a specially designed trailer of a semi-trailer truck. Through Feb. 6. Various times. Free. Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts, Eva and Marc Stern Arrival Court, 9390 N. Santa Monica Blvd., Beverly Hills. (310) 442-0020. thisishunger.org/the-tour.

TUE FEB 6
“REACHING ACROSS THE POLITICAL DIVIDE”

Rick Richman

Jewish Journal Publisher and Editor-in-Chief David Suissa leads a “nonpolitical” discussion of the nation’s political divide, emphasizing the goals and aspirations shared by Jews and citizens, regardless of party affiliations, along with ways people can come together to bridge the divide. Author Rick Richman moderates. 6:30-8:30 p.m. $10, includes dinner. Sinai Temple, 10400 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 474-1518. sinaitemple.org.

“CARING FOR YOUR AGING PARENTS”

Community Shul president and elder care expert Justin Levi leads a discussion on navigating key issues involved in caring for one’s aging parents. Issues addressed include advanced planning, selecting the right care and housing options, the future of elder care and what it means for children taking care of their parents, and Jewish/halachic issues relevant to aging. A Q-and-A will be held and light refreshments served. 7 p.m. Free. Community Shul, 9100 W. Pico Blvd., Los Angeles. RSVP to justin@clarendonsl.com.

WED FEB 7
“CATCH ’67”

Micah Goodman

Micah Goodman, research fellow at the Shalom Hartman Institute in Jerusalem, discusses “Catch ’67: 50 Years Since the Six-Day War.” He explores the tension between right-wing and left-wing ideological visions of what Israel and Zionism are meant to be, discusses where both sides have gone wrong, and questions what possibilities there would be if Israelis were to focus on common-sense wisdom rather than ideological commitments. 7:30 p.m. $10. American Jewish University, 15600 Mulholland Drive, Los Angeles. (310) 476-9777. aju.edu.

WAS ALEXANDER HAMILTON JEWISH?

A discussion of Alexander Hamilton’s roots features Rabbi Meir Soloveichik, director of the Zahava and Moshael Straus Center for Torah and Western Thought, and Alexander Porwancher, Straus visiting scholar. 7:30 p.m. Free. Beth Jacob Congregation, 9030 W. Olympic Blvd., Beverly Hills. (212) 960-5400, ext. 6902. bethjacob.org.

What’s Happening In Jewish L.A. 1/27-2/1: Book Signing, Tu B’Shevat and More

SAT JAN 27
“WHAT WE TALK ABOUT WHEN WE TALK ABOUT INTERMARRIAGE”

In 1993, Rabbi Adina Lewittes became the first Canadian woman to be ordained as a Conservative rabbi, but she later left the movement because of her support for interfaith weddings. She delivers an inclusive, text-based and communal conversation on the controversial topic during IKAR’s Saturday morning services and luncheon as part of the Lisa and Maury Friedman Foundation guest speaker series. 9:15 a.m. to noon. Free. Shalhevet High School, 910 S. Fairfax Ave., Los Angeles. (323) 634-1870. ikar-la.org.

HOOTENANNY COMMUNITY JAM SESSION & POTLUCK

Calling all musicians and lovers of good times! Bring a dish to share and an instrument to play at this potluck get-together. The Silverlake Independent Jewish Community Center (SIJCC) will provide the space and songbook. All ages welcome. Park in the lot, bike or take public transportation. $10 suggested donation. 3-6 p.m. The Box at SIJCC, 1110 Bates Ave., Los Angeles. (323) 663-2255. sijcc.net.

SUN JAN 28
AUTHOR JENNIFER TAITZ BOOK SIGNING

Jennifer Taitz

Clinical psychologist and author Jennifer Taitz discusses and signs “How to Be Single and Happy: Science-Based Strategies for Keeping Your Sanity While Looking for a Soul Mate,” an evidence-based guide for single women on how to navigate the stressful world of modern dating. 3 p.m. Free; book, $16. Diesel, A Bookstore, 225 26th St., Santa Monica. (310) 576-9960. dieselbookstore.com.

FREE MUSEUM DAY

Skirball Cultural Center

Dozens of Southern California institutions are offering free admission, with the goal of whetting the public’s appetite for visiting museums and galleries year round. The event is organized by a group called SoCal Museums, comprising representatives from museums across the L.A. region. Free admission will be offered at the Skirball Cultural Center, 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles, (310) 440-4500, skirball.org; the Museum of Tolerance, 9786 W. Pico Blvd., Los Angeles, (310) 772-2505, museumoftolerance.com; and the Zimmer Children’s Museum, 6505 Wilshire Blvd., No. 100, Los Angeles, (323) 761-8984, zimmermuseum.org.

MON JAN 29
“MYSTERIES OF LIFE: DARWINISM VS. INTELLIGENT DESIGN”

A film screening and discussion with Kehillat Ma’arav Rabbi Michael Gottlieb takes place at 7 p.m. $5 donation requested. Kehillat Ma’arav, 1715 21st St., Santa Monica. (310) 529-0566. km-synagogue.org.

THU FEB 1
AN EVENING WITH AUTHOR DAVID FRUM

David Frum

No conservative has been a more astute, unsparing or courageous critic of President Donald Trump than author David Frum. His upcoming book, “Trumpocracy: The Corruption of the American Republic,” is a powerful summation of the case against Trump based on a close reading of his first year in office. Frum is a senior editor at The Atlantic and the author of nine books, including The New York Times best-seller “The Right Man.” From 2001 to 2002, he served as a speechwriter and special assistant to President George W. Bush. 8 p.m. $53 reserved section seat, plus book; $43 general admission, plus book; $20 general admission.
Ann and Jerry Moss Theatre, New Roads School, Herb Alpert Educational Village, 3131 Olympic Blvd., Santa Monica. livetalksla.org.

Tu B’Shevat

SAT JAN 27
“TU B’SHEVAT IN 3-D”

Daven, drash and dine at a community seder sponsored by Kehillat Ma’arav. All welcome. Free. 9:30–10:30 a.m. Kehillat Ma’arav, 1715 21st St., Santa Monica. (310) 839-0566. km-synagogue.org.

TU B’SHEVAT HIKE

Adat Ari El Rabbi Jonathan Jaffe Bernhard and his Conservative synagogue community connect with nature and its blessings during an afternoon Tu B’Shevat hike. 2 p.m. Free. Tree People, 12601 Mulholland Drive, Beverly Hills. (818) 766-9426. adatariel.org.

SUN JAN 28
“CELEBRATE TOGETHER”: A TU B’SHEVAT EVENT

Member families from Leo Baeck Temple, Kehillat Israel and Temple Isaiah gather to celebrate and learn about Tu B’Shevat, Israel’s Arbor Day. Guests can hike, stroll, create crafts inspired by nature, learn about composting, participate in guided meditation, try creative writing and learn what Judaism says about being stewards for our planet. 9-11:30 a.m. Free. Temescal Canyon Park, 15900 Pacific Coast Highway, Pacific Palisades (enter at the intersection of Temescal Canyon and Sunset Boulevard and follow the “Celebrate Together” signs). Limited parking at site, with additional parking on Sunset Boulevard. ourki.org.

TU B’SHEVAT CELEBRATION OF THE TREES

Pico-Robertson community Young Israel of Century City (YICC) brings together its modern Orthodox families for a morning of arts and crafts, tree planting, a mini-seder and more. For parents, YICC Associate Rabbi James Proops delivers a lecture titled “Planting and Building Our Children.” 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Young Israel of Century City, 9317 W. Pico Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 273-6954. yicc.org.

TU B’SHEVAT FAMILY FUN DAY 2018

Bring the family to celebrate the “birthday of the trees” at the Shalom Institute in Malibu. The festivities include Tu B’Shevat nature crafts, farming fun for toddlers, tree planting, rope making, outdoor pita cooking and more. Lunch will be served in the dining hall; a Tu B’Shevat singalong will put everyone in the spirit of the holiday; and a ropes course will offer a test of physical fitness. Held on 220 wooded acres, this get-together is a can’t-miss for those with little ones who want to get into the holiday spirit. 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. $10; kids 6 and younger, free. Shalom Institute, 34342 Mulholland Highway, Malibu. (818) 889-5500. shalominstitute.com.

ANNUAL WJCC TU B’SHEVAT FESTIVAL

The Westside Jewish Community Center welcomes guests to celebrate the “birthday of the trees.” There will be a silent auction, food, games, crafts, a bounce house, farmers market, photo booth and puppy party. Guests who live or own property in the city of Los Angeles can take home a free fruit or shade tree, courtesy of City Plants (verification by driver’s license, ID or DWP bill; trees must be planted on private property). Rain or shine. Free. 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. (323) 556-5250. westsidejcc.org.

WED JAN 31
KABBALISTIC TU B’SHEVAT SEDER

Many years ago in the ancient city of Tzfat, a group of kabbalists uncovered the
mystical secrets of Tu B’Shevat. They revealed these mystical secrets in a ceremony
patterned after the Passover seder and observed this ritual on the night of Tu B’Shevat, the 15th of Shevat. Join Pico Shul for a memorable excursion into the mystical
realm of the holiday through this unique seder. Rabbi Yonah Bookstein has written
text for the event based on the ancient seder recited by the kabbalists in Tzfat
centuries ago. 7–10 p.m. $18 for young professionals, $36 for general admission.
Reservations are recommended as space is limited. Pico Shul, 9116 W. Pico Blvd., Los Angeles. picoshul.org.

What’s Happening In Jewish L.A. Jan. 19-23: Women’s March, Holocaust Memorial and More

FRI JAN 19
SHABBAT AND HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL

Curt Lowens

Celebrate Shabbat while marking International Holocaust Remembrance Day as Emmy-nominated composer Sharon Farber, Temple of the Arts Rabbi David Baron and Remember Us Director Samara Hutman lead a memorial service in honor of survivor, actor and Dutch resistance member Curt Lowens. During World War II, Lowens, who died last May, helped rescue Jewish children. He then turned to acting and appeared in more than 100 film and television projects. The service features a concert based on Lowens’ memoir, “Destination: Questionmark.” Participants include Yiddish actor and director Mike Burstyn, who emcees; the Kadima Conservatory Philharmonic; the 35-piece AJU Choir of American Jewish University; jazz musician Corky Hale; Temple of the Arts Cantor Ilysia Pierce; and German Consul General in Los Angeles Hans Neumann. Shabbat service, 7:30 p.m. Concert, 8 p.m. Free. Temple of the Arts, 8440 Wilshire Blvd., Beverly Hills, (323) 658-9100. bhtota.org.

SOCIAL JUSTICE SHABBAT

Doug McCormick, president of the Pacific Palisades Task Force on Homelessness, appears at Kehillat Israel, a Reconstructionist community, to address the growing crisis of homelessness in Los Angeles County. 7 p.m. Free. Kehillat Israel, 16019 W. Sunset Blvd., Pacific Palisades. (310) 459-2328. ourki.org.

SAT JAN 20
WOMEN’S MARCH

To commemorate the one-year anniversary of the historic Women’s March of 2017, people will gather in downtown Los Angeles to advocate for ending violence, protecting reproductive rights and more. Starting at Pershing Square and ending at Grand Park and City Hall, this year’s march features music, art, community booths and speakers. About 200,000 attendees are expected. Gather, 9 a.m. March and events, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Free. Start: Pershing Square, 532 S. Olive St., Los Angeles. End: City Hall, 200 N. Spring St., Los Angeles. (310) 200-0124. womensmarchla.org.

“SPEAK OUT”

Jewish Women’s Theatre (JWT) presents works by four artists who use their individuality and diversity to speak for those who have no voice: Pat Berger, Jenny Rubin, Corrie Siegel and Alexandra Wiesenfeld. The exhibition’s official opening and art talk precedes the premiere performance of JWT’s new salon show, “The Accidental Activist.” Exhibition and art talk are free; tickets required for performance. 6:30 p.m. Through March 5. The Gallery@The Braid, 2912 Colorado Ave., Suite 102, Santa Monica. (310) 315-1400. jewishwomenstheatre.org.

“LAST THOUGHTS: SCHUBERT’S FINAL WORKS”

Ory Shihor

Israeli-American pianist Ory Shihor tells the story behind Franz Schubert’s last compositions — some of the most miraculous music the Austrian composer created — through music and words. This evening of music and storytelling also features text by Canadian-Jewish musician Hershey Felder, who does not appear in the performance. The program features “Impromptu in F minor,” “Sonata in C minor” and “Sonata in B flat major D.” 7:30 p.m. $25-$75. Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts, Bram Goldsmith Theater, 9390 N. Santa Monica Blvd., Beverly Hills. (310) 746-4000. thewallis.org.

SUN JAN 21
“THE CANTOR’S COUCH”

Jack Mendelson

Temple Judea hosts a journey through Cantor Jack Mendelson’s real-life stories based on growing up in 1950s Brooklyn in “The Cantor’s Couch.” Mendelson paints a picture of a bygone day in Jewish America when Jews would flock to synagogues to hear cantors as if they were in a concert hall. The one-man show weds a relatable story of childhood with joyous memories of music and celebration. Mendelson’s collaborator and accompanist will be Cantor Jonathan Comisar, who wrote original music for this production. All proceeds help support the music program at Temple Judea. 5 p.m. Students, $10; general admission, $18. Temple Judea, Goor Sanctuary, 5429 Lindley Ave., Tarzana. (818) 758-3800. templejudea.com.

UNITE 4 ISRAEL

During this second  annual day of unity — Unite 4 Israel — Jewish teenagers celebrate the Jewish state through martial arts, food, learning and more. Workshops include a mock Israel Defense Forces boot camp featuring Hezi Sheli, a former special forces fighter and head instructor of the Israeli Martial Arts Academy in Westlake Village. Also, students explore a 10-by-18-foot copy of the Israeli Declaration of Independence. A hands-on session allows participants to create their own bowl of hummus with guidance by culinary professional Sigal Ratoviz. Rabbi Moshe Bryski of Chabad of the Conejo delivers opening remarks. A buffet lunch features Israeli cuisine and a live DJ. The event also includes Israeli trivia and a raffle. Open to students in grades 8-12 only. 10 a.m. $10. Chabad of Westlake Village, 2425 Townsgate Road, Suite H, Thousand Oaks. israel200.com.

BEN MACINTYRE AND STEVE ROSS

Steve Ross, a professor at USC and author of “Hitler in Los Angeles,” which explores the role of Nazis in L.A. and the spies who stopped them, and British author and historian Ben MacIntyre discuss espionage in World War II Europe and Los Angeles. 1 p.m. $20. Temple Emanuel of Beverly Hills, 8844 Burton Way, Beverly Hills. writersblocpresents.com.

“RACE AND INCLUSIVITY IN THE AMERICAN JEWISH COMMUNITY”

A panel discusses the challenges and opportunities of inclusivity in the Jewish community. Speakers include Lacey Schwartz, an award-winning documentary filmmaker and director of North America outreach for Be’chol Lashon, which deals with issues of racial and cultural diversity in the Jewish community; Rabbi Sharon Brous, senior founding rabbi of IKAR, a leading voice in reanimating Jewish tradition and practice; and Bruce Phillips, professor of sociology and Jewish communal service at Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion. Presented by the USC Casden Institute and IKAR Los Angeles. Free, reservations requested. 4-5:30 p.m. Doheny Memorial Library, 3550 Trousdale Parkway, Los Angeles, Room 240. (213) 740-1744. usc.edu/esvp.

“THE BEST SATIRICAL SONGS IN HISTORY”

Comedian and screenwriter David Misch headlines an afternoon of musical satire, with songs and film clips featuring Groucho Marx, Randy Newman, Chuck Berry, “Weird Al” Yankovic, Gilbert and Sullivan, Amy Schumer and Bugs Bunny. 4 p.m. $12-$22. American Jewish University Familian Campus, 15600 Mulholland Drive, Bel Air. (310) 440-1572. aju.edu/whizin.

“BEFORE THE REVOLUTION”

The Israeli community in Iran enjoyed a luxurious life under the Shah. That all changed during the Islamic Revolution. “Before the Revolution,” a documentary made in 2013, tells the story about the last days of the Israeli community in Iran. It features archival footage; interviews with diplomats, Mossad agents, business people and others, and is presented from the perspective of a director whose family was a part of this Israeli community. The film will be shown at Sephardic Temple Tifereth Israel in Westwood. Refreshments served. 4:30 p.m. Free. Sephardic Temple Tifereth Israel, 10500 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 475-7000. sephardictemple.org.

FLAMENCO DANCER LEILAH BROUKHIM

Leilah Broukhim

Flamenco powerhouse Leilah Broukhim performs “Dejando Huellas” (“Traces”), a personal story about her Jewish and Persian heritage. This L.A. debut showcases the Spanish art form and the performer’s commitment to a tale of a woman searching for meaning and identity. 7:30 p.m. $33-$78. Valley Performing Arts Center, 18111 Nordhoff St., Northridge. (818) 677-8800. valleyperformingartscenter.org.

TUE JAN 23
“PRESERVATION AND INNOVATION: THE TRACKS OF THE MASTER SCRIBE”

Sara Milstein, assistant professor of Hebrew Bible and Near Eastern Studies at the University of British Columbia, discusses the “master scribes” of the ancient Near East and their method of introducing changes to texts in the course of transmission. Linguists, academics and bookworms should enjoy this UCLA Center for Jewish Studies lecture. Noon. Free. UCLA, 314 Royce Hall, Los Angeles. (310) 267-5327. cjs.ucla.edu.

“STRIVE NOT TO GOSSIP”

When is it permissible to speak about someone who isn’t present? When is it forbidden to spread information about another person — whether it is true or not? Incorporating the teachings of the “Chafetz Chaim” (the Jewish “Bible” about gossip), Rabbi Jonathan Aaron explores the subtleties of what is considered in Jewish tradition to be one of the most dangerous of human behaviors, lashon harah (the evil tongue). 7 p.m. Free. Temple Emanuel of Beverly Hills, 8844 Burton Way, Beverly Hills. (310) 288-3737. tebh.org/striveclass.

“BIMBAM: WATCH SOMETHING JEWISH”

Sarah Lefton

Sarah Lefton, founder of BimBam (formerly G-dcast), which uses digital storytelling to spark connections to Judaism for learners of all ages, appears at this special evening for parents with young children. She shares a series of Jewish videos and animated series that can elevate children’s free time and help bring Judaism into the home. 7:30 p.m. Stephen
Wise Temple members, $15; public, $20. Stephen Wise Temple, 15500 Stephen S. Wise Drive, Los Angeles. (310) 476-8561. wisela.org/cjl.

Blocks of Time: DIY Perpetual Calendar

Photos by Jonathan Fong.

It’s a new year, which means it’s time to get a new calendar for my work desk. After all, some of us are old school and would rather not have to switch on our smartphones just to check the date.

This calendar made of wood blocks was inspired by an idea I found on the design blog holasara.com — run by my colleague at the Journal, Sara Budisantoso — and I customized it so you’d have as few supplies to purchase as possible.

Just print out the free template HERE, cut out the months and dates, and glue them to three wood blocks according to the template. You will have a perpetual calendar that is good all year long — and for years to come.

What you’ll need:
Three 2-inch wood blocks
Printout of template
1 1/2-inch circle punch or scissors
Glue or glue stick

1.

1. Start with three 2-inch blocks, which you can find at crafts stores like Michaels. You also can find them on Amazon or other online retailers that sell arts and crafts supplies.

2.

2. Download the template, which features the necessary months and numbers for the six sides of the three blocks. Print out the three pages, one for each block. They are drawn to scale.

3.

3. Cut out each of the months and numbers with a 1 1/2-inch circle punch. Using a paper punch makes it easy, but if you don’t have one, you can cut them out with scissors. You can leave them in a square shape if you prefer.

4.

4. Glue each month and number to the blocks according to the template. The months will be on one block, with two months per side, and the other two blocks make up the dates 1 through 31.

What’s Happening in Jewish L.A. Jan. 5-11: Special Shabbats, Film Screenings and Lectures

An event honoring Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel and the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. will take place on Jan. 11.

FRI JAN 5
NASHUVA SHABBAT SERVICE

Naomi Levy

A soulful monthly Shabbat service with the Nashuva community takes place in Brentwood. Led by Rabbi Naomi Levy, wife of former Jewish Journal Editor-in-Chief Rob Eshman, Nashuva (Hebrew for “return”) is a congregation of Jews committed to spirituality and social action. Services feature a live band, meditation and the embrace of a welcoming and accessible environment. Zimmer Children’s Museum staffs onsite and concurrent programming for children. An oneg Shabbat with treats follows. Attendees are encouraged to dress casually and wear white in honor of Shabbat. 6:45-8:30 p.m. Free. Brentwood Presbyterian Church, 12000 San Vicente Blvd., Los Angeles. nashuva.com.

JEWISH WOMEN SHABBAT

Lev Eisha, a community of Jewish women, holds a joyous Shabbat musical celebration for Jewish women. Rabbi Toba August, Cindy Paley and Joy Krauthammer lead the service. A Kiddush follows. Though the service is for and led by women, all are welcome. 9:30 a.m. Free. Beth Shir Shalom, 1827 California Ave., Santa Monica. (310) 575-0985. leveisha.org.

“THE WOMEN’S BALCONY”

“The Women’s Balcony”

Temple Beth Am screens the Israeli dramatic comedy “The Women’s Balcony” as part of the synagogue’s film series. In the film, an accident during a bat mitzvah celebration leads to a gender rift in the devout Orthodox community in Jerusalem. Producer, writer and film historian Michael Berlin participates in pre- and post-screening conversations. 7:30 p.m. $12. Temple Beth Am, 1039 S. La Cienega Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 652-7353. tbala.org.

SUN JAN 7
BASIC STAINED GLASS TRAINING

Revital Goldreich, an award-winning artist who is in the process of earning a master’s in interfaith relations from the Academy of Jewish Religion, California, teaches how to make stained-glass windows to Shomrei Torah Synagogue members and their friends. Participants learn the four steps to the art: cutting, grinding, coppering and soldering. Goldreich cuts the glass and organizes a production line to grind, copper and solder the glass. The four-hour workshop is limited to eight participants. Ages 18 and older. Through March 25. $36 (first time in the studio), $18 (second time in the studio), free (third time in the studio). 1-5 p.m. Revital’s Studio, 20643 Quedo Drive, Woodland Hills. (818) 458-9389. stsonline.org.

“PUSH AND PULL GENEALOGY”

Jewish Genealogical Society of the Conejo and Ventura County founding member Werner Frank discusses the small world of Jewish genealogy and the rationale behind the claim that all Ashkenazi Jews are at least 30th cousins. 1:30-3:30 p.m. Free. Temple Adat Elohim, 2420 E. Hillcrest Drive, Thousand Oaks. (818) 889-6616. jgscv.org.

ADAT ARI EL’S 24TH ANNUAL ENGEL CHAMBER MUSIC CONCERT

The New Hollywood String Quartet & Friends will honor the 100th birthday of the late Rose Engel with an afternoon of music by Schubert. A reception with light refreshments will follow. Presented by the Rose & Edward Engel Music Commission. 2-4 p.m. Free; RSVP is requested. David Familian Chapel, Adat Ari El, 12020 Burbank Blvd., Valley Village. (818) 755-3480, ext. 244. adatariel.org.

TIKKUN OLAM FILM SCREENING AND DISCUSSION

Anthony Bourdain

Producer Anthony Bourdain’s “Wasted! The Story of Food Waste,” an exploration into why 1.3 billion tons of food is thrown away each year, screens at Kehillat Israel. Celebrity chefs including Bourdain, Massimo Bottura and Dan Barber appear in the 2017 documentary film. A free dinner kicks off the event. A panel discussion follows. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. 16019 W. Sunset Blvd., Pacific Palisades. (310) 459-2328. ourki.org.

MON JAN 8
THREE DOCUMENTARY SHORTS

“116 Cameras”

Would you jump from a 10-meter-high diving board for the first time for $30? Swedish filmmakers Maximilien Van Aertryck and Axel Danielson worked with this premise in their 16-minute documentary short, “Ten Meter Tower.” What drives the participants more: the fear of the plunge or the fear of missing out? This film, along with two other documentary shorts contending for best documentary short subject at the Academy Awards, screen at the Museum of Tolerance. The other films are “116  Cameras,” director Davina Pardo’s 16-minute film following Holocaust survivor and stepsister of Anne Frank Eva Schloss’ effort to preserve her story interactively, and director Garrett Bradley’s “Alone,” a film about the American prison system tearing apart a family. A discussion follows with New York Times Hollywood reporter Brooks Barnes and Van Aertryck, Pardo and Bradley, the films’ directors. 7 p.m. Free (advance reservations required). Museum of Tolerance, 9786 W. Pico Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 772-2505. museumoftolerance.com/opdocs.

TUE JAN 9
“SEPHARDIC WOMEN’S VOICES”

Nina Lichtenstein

Nina Lichtenstein shares stories from her book, “Sephardic Women’s Voices,” which traces the lives and writings of contemporary Jewish women born in North Africa who migrated to France. The author explores the meaning of their Sephardic heritage, their roles as women and their experience of exile. There will be an excerpt reading, interview and Q-and-A with the author. Light refreshments served. Books available for sale. 7-9 p.m. $10. The Braid, 2912 Colorado Ave., #102. Santa Monica. (310) 315-1400. jewishwomenstheatre.org.

TOWN HALL WITH COUNCILMAN  PAUL KORETZ

Paul Koretz

Join a discussion about current events with Los Angeles City Councilman Paul Koretz, who represents the Fifth District, as he talks about key issues and challenges facing the community. Open to the public. A brief Q-and-A will follow. 1-2:30 p.m. Free; registration is required at (323) 937-5900. JFS Freda Mohr Multipurpose Senior Center, 6310 San Vicente Blvd., Suite 275. jfsla.org.

WED JAN 10
“INTERMARRIAGE: OPPORTUNITY, CHALLENGE, OR THREAT?”

Can intermarriage be transformed into an opportunity for the Jewish community or is it a threat to its survival? Sinai Temple Rabbi Erez Sherman moderates a panel discussion on one of the greatest issues facing the Jewish community. Participants are Rabbi Brad Artson, dean of rabbinic studies at American Jewish University, and Rabbi Aaron Lerner, executive director of Hillel at UCLA. Their discussion explores intermarriage from different points of view and addresses a number of critical questions: What are its implications for individual Jews, families and the community? Can the trend of an increasing number of Jews marrying outside the faith be reversed? Everyone welcome. 6:30 p.m. Free dinner for Sinai Temple Men’s Club and Sinai Temple members; $10 for nonmembers. Sinai Temple, 10400 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 474-1518, ext. 3340. sinaitemple.org.

“RETHINKING INSULARITY”

Shulem Deem

Some observant Jews integrate elements of secular society into their lives. Others keep the outside world at a safe distance. During tonight’s Shalhevet Institute discussion, “Rethinking Insularity: The Role of Boundaries in the Modern World,” Shulem Deen, author of “All Who Go Do Not Return,” and Rabbi Yakov Horowitz, dean of Yeshiva Darchei Noam in Monsey, N.Y., discuss the challenges facing their communities. Abigal Shrier, a writer on Jewish affairs, moderates. 7:30 p.m. Free. Shalhevet High School, 910 S. Fairfax Ave., Los Angeles. (323) 930-9333. shalhevet.org.

“A SPOONFUL OF HESED”

Make meals for those in need of healing with Sinai Temple’s social action committee, sisterhood and Sinai Temple Rabbi Nicole Guzik. Ingredients and supplies for cooking soup will be provided. If you can’t join in on the cooking but are willing to drop off soup at someone’s house, contact Guzik. Adults and children ages 10 and older are welcome. 7-9 p.m. Free. RSVP at (310) 481-3234 or nguzik@sinaitemple.org. Sinai Temple, 10400 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. sinaitemple.org.

“MY JEWISH GENERATION”

Pressman Academy alum and Milken Community Schools Jewish studies teacher Joshua Krug discusses “My Jewish Generation: A Portrait of Millennial Jewish Identities in the USA.” Krug opens up about his personal journey from Beth Am in the 1990s to a doctoral study in Jewish education while he reflects on the state of his Jewish generation. By sketching a loose map of his generation, he will shed light on what is happening to Judaism and Jewish identity in America today. 7:30 p.m. Free. Temple Beth Am, 1039 S. La Cienega Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 652-7353. tbala.org.

THU JAN 11
THE LEGACIES OF KING AND HESCHEL

Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel and the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.

An interfaith event celebrates the birthdays and legacies of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel, partners and friends in the fight for civil rights. Choirs will perform, faith leaders will speak, and participants, including those from Stephen Wise Temple, Bel Air Presbyterian Church and Faithful Central Bible Church, will reflect on King and Heschel’s contributions to humanity. 7:30 p.m. Free. Stephen Wise Temple, 15500 Stephen S. Wise Drive, Los Angeles. (310) 476-8561. wisela.org/kingandheschel.

What’s Happening in Jewish L.A. Dec. 22-28: Volunteering, Comedy, Singles Events and More

"Fiddler on the Roof" will be played at various Los Angeles theaters on Christmas Eve.

FRI DEC 22
“FACES OF HOMELESSNESS: BRINGING OUR NEIGHBORS HOME FOR GOOD”

The exhibition features oil-on-canvas portraits by Stuart Perlman of area homeless people that are accompanied by biographies of the subjects. Perlman, who has been a psychologist and psychoanalyst in Los Angeles for more than 30 years, began painting these portraits in 2010. He spent hours listening to his subjects’ stories and getting to know them. He has painted 200 portraits of homeless people who have lived on Venice Beach and Skid Row. Through March 7. By appointment. Free. Council House, 543 N. Fairfax Ave., Los Angeles. (323) 852-8512. ncjwla.org.

FINAL SHABBAT FLOW OF 2017

Experience the peace and presence of Shabbat through the mindful movement of a vinyasa flow yoga class. Live music, chanting, challah. No seats, no books, no stress. Welcome, namaste and shalom! Bring your yoga mat, towel and water, and wear comfortable exercise clothes. Roll out your mat, take stock in what you accomplished in 2017 and set intentions for 2018. Hosted by Om Shalom Yoga. 8 p.m. $15. Space limited; guests admitted on a first-come, first-served basis. Yogaraj Yoga Studio, 2001 S. Barrington Ave., Los Angeles. (Free parking in the structure next door.) (424) 299-2507. facebook.com/omshalomyoga.

SAT DEC 23
“THE MENORAH”

Like Hanukkah, this night of improv comedy has a theme of eight: eight scenes from eight improvisers. One person begins a scene, which builds to an eight-person scene, then revisits all of the show’s scenes again. Featuring Beth Appel, Hal Rudnick, Jonny Svarzbein, Talia Tabin, Danny Cymbal, Matthew Brian Cohen, Jake Fallon and Heather Sundell. 7 p.m. $7. UCBT Franklin, 5919 Franklin Ave., Los Angeles. (323) 908-8702. franklin.ucbtheatre.com.

“WE ARE AMERICA”

Pink Lady and Senior Star Power present this musical salute to veterans. Performers range in age from their 60s to their 90s, but they bring the sassy, the sexy and the sizzle in this revue featuring singing and dancing. Through Dec. 31. 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. Dec. 23 and Dec. 30, 6:30 p.m.  Dec. 31. $25-$45 (Dec. 23 and 30), $60 (Dec. 31). Madrid Theatre, 21622 Sherman Way, Canoga Park. (818) 400-2701. brownpapertickets.com/event/3097240.

SUN DEC 24
“FIDDLER ON THE ROOF” SINGALONG

Tevye, Golde and the folks of Anatevka light up Norman Jewison’s musical film, which plays at Laemmle theaters across Los Angeles on Christmas Eve. This year marks a decade since Laemmle began this annual “Tradition,” featuring Jewish leaders serving as hosts of the screenings, prescreening trivia and prizes for “Fiddler” buffs, and more. Attendees are encouraged to come dressed in costume. Children are welcome. 7:30 p.m. Additional 5 p.m. screening at the Town Center 5 in Encino. $18 (general), $15 (seniors, students). Town Center 5, 17200 Ventura Blvd.; NoHo 7, 5420 Lankershim Blvd., North Hollywood; Ahrya Fine Arts, 8556 Wilshire Blvd., Beverly Hills; Playhouse 7, 673 E. Colorado Blvd., Pasadena; Royal, 11523 Santa Monica Blvd., Los Angeles; Claremont 5, 450 W. Second St., Claremont. (310) 478-3836. laemmle.com.

ELON GOLD’S “MERRY EREV XMAS”

Stand-up comedian Elon Gold performs on Christmas Eve with special guests at the Laugh Factory in Hollywood. Come for his spot-on Jeff Goldblum and Woody Allen impersonations; stay for his humorous insights about what it is to be Jewish in contemporary America. 7:30 p.m., 9:30 p.m., 11:30 p.m., $35 (general), $55 (VIP). Laugh Factory, 8001 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. (323) 656-1336, ext. 1. laughfactory.com/clubs/hollywood.

MOSTLY KOSHER

The indie klezmer and folk band puts a modern twist on traditional Jewish sounds when it performs at the 58th annual L.A. County Holiday Celebration. Led by musician Leeav Sofer, who was named one of the Jewish Journal’s “30 Under 30,” Mostly Kosher bridges Jewish and American musical roots. Other performers at this multicultural event presented by the L.A. County Board of Supervisors include VOX Femina Los Angeles, a choir of 34 women that will perform Hanukkah and Christmas songs. Musicians from Korea, Hawaii, West Africa and elsewhere also perform. Those who can’t make it in person can catch a broadcast of the event on KOCE, the PBS SoCal station. The event also will be streamed live at pbssocal.org. 3-6 p.m. Free (first come, first served). Music Center’s Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, 135 N. Grand Ave., Los Angeles. (213) 972-3099. musiccenter.org/holidaycelebration.

“JOKES FOR JEWS”

Michael Gelbart

Spend Christmas Eve laughing with a lineup of nearly a dozen comedians. Michael Gelbart, who has appeared on Comedy Central, Teen Nick, the Disney Channel and Starz, headlines. Additional performers include Adam Feuerberg, Dana Eagle and Joshua Snyder. 7 p.m. $20. Flapper’s Comedy Club Burbank, 102 E. Magnolia, Burbank. (818) 845-9721. flapperscomedy.com.

THE BALL 2017

Mix, mingle and socialize at this Jewish singles event in West Hollywood. (What else are you going to do on Christmas Eve?) Previous years have drawn upward of 1,000 attendees, so arrive early to avoid long lines. 8:30 p.m. to 2 a.m. $35-$50. Bootsy Bellows, 9229 Sunset Blvd., West Hollywood. letmypeoplego.com.

MATZOBALL

Find your bashert in time for New Year’s. The 31st annual MatzoBall on Christmas Eve draws young Jewish singles looking for friendships, hookups and marriages. 21-and-older only. IDs required. 9 p.m. to 2 a.m. $30. Spare Room (Inside the Roosevelt Hotel), 7000 Hollywood Blvd., Los Angeles. matzoball.org/our_events/matzoball-los-angeles.

MON DEC 25
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD CHRISTMAS MEAL

Temple Israel of Hollywood has held an annual Christmas meal for the underprivileged and homeless for more than 30 years. Volunteers are needed for the event’s setup, parking lot control, food service and cleanup. Setup is 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Dec. 23 (open to all ages). Christmas Day shifts are 6-10 a.m. for early food preparation (13 and older), 6:30-10 a.m. for parking lot control (13 and older), 8-10 a.m. for first shift (13 and older) and 4-5 p.m. for cleanup. The meal is served from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Hollywood United Methodist Church, 6817 Franklin Ave., Hollywood. (323) 874-2104 (church); (323) 876-8330 (temple). tioh.org.

“DREAMING OF A JEWISH CHRISTMAS”

Gaston Poon in “Dreaming of a Jewish Christmas.”

Director Larry Weinstein’s irreverent musical documentary tells the story of a group of Jewish songwriters, including Irving Berlin, Mel Torme and Johnny Marks, who wrote the soundtrack to Christianity’s most musical holiday. It is a tale of Jewish immigrants and how they used their talent to go from being outsiders to the creative forces behind Christmas’ most memorable music. A Q-and-A follows with classic film and music expert Michael Schlesinger. Noon. $11. Laemmle Town Center, 17200 Ventura Blvd., Encino. (800) 838-3006. lajfilmfest.org.

ONE-ON-ONE OUTREACH DELIVERY

Join congregants of synagogue Kehillat Israel in packing and delivering groceries and toys to low-income families in South Central Los Angeles. Co-founded by Kehillat Israel member Michael Schwartz, One-on-One Outreach is a volunteer organization that convenes once a month to help those in need. Noon to 2 p.m. Email Michael@oneononeoutreach.org for additional information. (310) 459-2328. ourki.org.

THU DEC 28
LUNCH ’N’ LEARN WITH RABBI VOGEL

Temple Aliyah Rabbi Stewart Vogel discusses and analyzes the week’s Torah portion.  This interactive classic offers insights into Judaism’s most sacred text. Accessible for beginner students. No Hebrew or previous Torah experience necessary. 12:15-1:45 p.m. Free. Temple Aliyah, 6025 Valley Circle Blvd., Woodland Hills. (818) 346-3545. templealiyah.org.

“AN AMERICAN TAIL”

Executive producer Steven Spielberg’s classic animated movie follows a Jewish family of mice emigrating from Russia to America by ship. At the center of the story is a young mouse named Fievel Mousekewitz, who gets lost from the rest of his family. Fievel’s family presumes he is adrift at sea, but Fievel makes it to New York and meets a bustling crew of colorful characters. Throughout the adventure, the little mouse is determined to reunite with his family. The film screens at the Skirball Cultural Center as part of “Family Film Series: Journeys Near and Far.” On Jan. 4, Pixar’s “Up” closes the series. 12:30 p.m. and 2:30 p.m. Free. Skirball Cultural Center, 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 440-4500. skirball.org.

What’s Happening in Jewish L.A. Dec. 15-21: Special Events, From Synagogues to Staples Center

Saul Kaye

FRI DEC 15
LATKE SHABBATKE

IKAR holds a musical, high-energy kabbalat Shabbat service, followed by a communal meal. Your favorite foods of the Festival of Lights are served. Vegetarian options available. 6:15 p.m. (scotch and services), 7:45 p.m. (dinner). $12. Shalhevet High School, 910 S. Fairfax Ave., Los Angeles. (323) 634-1870. ikar-la.org.

HANUKKAH BLUES SHABBAT AND CELEBRATION

Saul Kaye

Jewish blues artist Saul Kaye visits from San Francisco to perform at Temple Emanuel of Beverly Hills’ Hanukkah bash. 6:15 p.m. Free. Temple Emanuel of Beverly Hills, 8844 Burton Way, Beverly Hills. (310) 288-3737. Tebh.org.

CHANUKAHPALOOZA

Temple Judea holds a service and dinner with special holiday treats by the Temple Judea Brotherhood and Women of Temple Judea. A pop-up choir of adults and children performs. The event also features art projects, special musical guests and more. 6:15 p.m. (service), 7:30 p.m. (dinner). $15 (adults), $10 (kids 6-13), $4 (5 and younger). Temple Judea, 5429 Lindley Ave., Tarzana. (818)758-3800. templejudea.com.

COMMUNITY SHABBAT DINNER

Guest scholars Rabbi Irving “Yitz” Greenberg, author and founder of the National Jewish Center for Learning and Leadership, and his wife, Blu, a pioneer in Orthodox feminism, visit a community Shabbat dinner. The event is in recognition of the yahrzeit of Rabbi Harold Schulweis. 6 p.m. dinner, 7:30 p.m. dessert and speakers. $42 dinner; registration required. Dessert and speakers are free and open to the community. Valley Beth Shalom, 15739 Ventura Blvd., Encino. (818) 530-4009. vbs.org/scholar-dinner.

SHABBAT HANUKKAH ZIMRAH

University Synagogue holds a soulful and spiritual experience of music, connection and community. Flutist Peter Gordon, percussionist Ava Nahas and oud player Dimitris Mahlis participate. 7:30 p.m. Free. University Synagogue, 11960 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 472-1255. unisyn.org.

“NEW YORK WATER”

Bridget Flanery and Ross Benjamin in “New York Water”

It’s your last chance to see this comedy about Linda and Albert, who have a love-hate relationship with the Big Apple. This screwball romance, which spans years and locales, is written by Sam Borbrick and directed by Howard Teichman. 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday; 3 p.m. Sunday. Through Dec. 17. Tickets start at $40. Pico Playhouse, 10508 W. Pico Blvd., Los Angeles. (323) 821-2449. wcjt.org.

“AZIMUTH”

Director Mike Burstyn

Yiddish actor Mike Burstyn’s directorial debut begins a weeklong Oscar-qualifying run at the Laemmle in Encino. The war film, shot on location in Israel, is set during the last hours of the Six-Day War in an abandoned U.N. post in the Sinai. An Israeli soldier and an Egyptian soldier come to realize that in order to survive, they have to help each other. The film is based on a story Burstyn received after the war. Israeli actor Yiftach Klein and Egyptian actor Sammy Sheik, whose real-life fathers fought each other in the actual Six-Day War, co-star. Through Dec. 21. 3:15 p.m., 7:40 p.m. (Q-and-A sessions with Burstyn follow the 7:40 p.m. screenings), 10 p.m. $13 (general), $10 (seniors, children). Laemmle Town Center 5, 17200 Ventura Blvd., Encino. (310) 478-3836. laemmle.com.

SAT DEC 16
A SHABBAT HANUKKAH CELEBRATION

Join Beverly Hills Jewish Community (BHJC) for a program featuring the Chanukah Choral Spectacular, with Levi Coleman and the BHJC A Cappella Choir. Maestro Lior Himelstein conducts. The event includes dreidel games, latkes and glaze-your-own-doughnut activities for kids. Kiddush lunch follows. 9:30 a.m. (Shabbat services), 10:30 a.m. (cantorial performance). Free (RSVP at info@beverlyhillsjc.org). Beverly Hills Hotel, 9641 Sunset Blvd., Beverly Hills. (310) 276-4246. beverlyhillsjc.org.

DID JEW KNOW? HANUKKAH PUB TRIVIA

American Jewish University’s night of Jewy and not-so-Jewy pub trivia also features complimentary drinks and Hanukkah eats. 7 p.m. $15. Busby’s East, 5364 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. infinitelight.la/event/did-jew-know-hanukkah-pub-trivia.

THE KLEZMATICS

The Klezmatics.

Renowned klezmer band the Klezmatics perform a “Happy Joyous Hanukkah” concert at the Valley Performing Arts Center. The evening is a celebration of Yiddish culture at a time of year when candles and family warm the dark nights. The event embraces audiences of all cultures and backgrounds. 8 p.m. $33-$68. Valley Performing Arts Center, 18111 Nordhoff St., Northridge. (818) 677-8800. valleyperformingartscenter.org.

NISSIM BLACK

American rap star Nissim Black, born Damian Jamohl Black in Seattle, released two albums before retiring in 2011 to focus on his conversion to Orthodox Judaism. He returned in 2012 under his Hebrew name, Nissim, and began writing from a more religious perspective. This is his first performance in Los Angeles. With opening musical act Erez and comedian Tehran. For ages 18-36. 8:30 p.m. $40 in advance, $50 at the door. Nessah Synagogue, 142 S. Rexford Drive, Beverly Hills. (310) 273-2400. nessah.org.

SUN DEC 17
LEADERS DISCUSS GUN VIOLENCE

Chris Murphy.

Before becoming a United States senator, Chris Murphy served as the congressman representing Newtown, Conn., where 20 children and six educators were murdered at Sandy Hook Elementary School in 2012. Having seen the devastating effects of gun violence up close, Murphy emerged from that tragedy as one of Washington’s most outspoken gun violence prevention advocates. Murphy joins Los Angeles City Attorney Mike Feuer, who has been at the forefront of gun control legislation for more than 20 years, in a discussion. Sponsored by Writers Bloc. Noon. Tickets start at $25. Temple Emanuel of Beverly Hills, 8844 Burton Way, Beverly Hills. writersblocpresents.com.

“EDEN ACCORDING TO EVE”

“Eden According to Eve” is a funny, irreverent show about love, loss and the joys of life, featuring Shelly Goldstein, Monica Piper, Lisa Robins, Judith Scarpone and Robert Trebor. Directed by Susan Morgenstern. No one under age 16 admitted. 2 and 5 p.m. $40, includes dessert buffet and Q-and-A. The Braid, 2519 Colorado Ave., No. 102, Santa Monica. (310) 315-1400. Brown Paper Tickets, (800) 838-3006. jewishwomenstheatre.org.

INBAL ABERGIL BOOK LAUNCH

From 2014-17, Inbal Abergil traveled across the United States to photograph and interview 18 American families that lost loved ones in wars spanning from World War II to Vietnam to the ongoing conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. Abergil, an artist and educator originally from Jerusalem, launches a two-volume book of photographs from that experience called “N.O.K. — Next of Kin,” featuring images that examine the way American families memorialize relatives killed in military conflict, with commentary written by contributors. She holds a master’s in fine arts from Columbia University, and her work has been exhibited internationally in museum and gallery exhibitions. $10 (admission), $45 (book). RSVP recommended at arts@aju.edu. 5 p.m. American Jewish University, 15600 Mulholland Drive, Los Angeles. (310) 440-1246. wcce.aju.edu.

TUE DEC 19
“THE MESHUGA NUTCRACKER!”

“The Meshuga Nutcracker”

Don’t miss a nationwide cinema presentation of the Hanukkah musical, featuring the silly sensibilities of the folklore of Chelm, a Klezmer-influenced orchestration of Tchaikovsky’s “The Nutcracker Suite” and original lyrics that celebrate the Festival of Lights. Over the course of the film, the Chelmniks, residents of a fictional town of fools, tell eight stories, including the triumphant victory of the Maccabees, accounts of perseverance during the Holocaust and the celebration of the first Hanukkah in the new State of Israel. Dancing dreidels, singing sufganiyot and guest stars are thrown in for good measure. 7 p.m. $16 (adults), $13 (children, seniors). Ahrya Fine Arts, 8556 Wilshire Blvd., Beverly Hills; Playhouse 7, 673 E. Colorado Blvd., Pasadena; Town Center 5, 17200 Ventura Blvd., Encino. (310) 478-3836. laemmle.com.

WED DEC 20
L.A. CLIPPERS JEWISH HERITAGE NIGHT

Celebrate the last night of Hanukkah with NBA action at Staples Center as the Los Angeles Clippers square off against the Phoenix Suns. The Clippers have been struggling this season, so maybe the miracle of the Festival of Lights is just what the team needs to turn things around. A pregame ceremony features a candle lighting and blessings in front of a 10-foot menorah. Attendees receive a complimentary Clippers menorah. 7:30 p.m. From $16. Staples Center, 1111 S. Figueroa St., Los Angeles. nba.com/clippers/promotions/specialevents.

THU DEC 21
SYRIAN TORAH CASE DEDICATION

At Sinai Temple, Drs. Nooshin and Afshine Emrani present the 19th-century artifact Syrian Torah case to the Westwood Conservative congregation. Sinai Temple Max Webb Senior Rabbi David Wolpe delivers commemorative remarks, following evening minyan. 6:15-7 p.m. Free. Sinai Temple, 10400 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 474-1518. sinaitemple.org.

DAVID BROZA AND FRIENDS

David Broza

Israeli singer and guitarist David Broza and a new set of all-star musicians perform eclectic world music offerings combining Middle Eastern influences with sounds meant to please all ages and backgrounds. Joining Broza are Ali Paris (qanun), Jonathan Levy (guitar), Yuval Lion (drums), Uri Kleinman (bass) and Tali Rubinstein (recorder). 7:30 p.m. $65-$115. The Broad Stage, 1310 11th St., Santa Monica. (310) 434-3200. thebroadstage.org/davidbroza.

What’s Happening in Jewish L.A. Dec. 8-14: Hanukkah Celebrations, JCC Run & Walk, and More

The "First Night" will be held on Tuesday in Downtown Los Angeles to celebrate the first night of Hanukkah.

FRI DEC 8
“BIG SONIA”

Sonia Warshawski

Holocaust survivor. Grandma. Diva. Big Sonia. Director Leah Warshawski’s documentary film follows her octogenarian grandmother, Sonia Warshawski, a Holocaust survivor who runs the last store in a defunct shopping mall, a tailor shop she’s owned for more than 30 years. When Sonia, one of the last remaining survivors in Kansas City, is given an eviction notice, the specter of retirement forces her to confront her harrowing past, which includes concentration camps and death marches. The film weaves Sonia’s current conflict with stories about her diva-like personality from family and friends. Various times. Laemmle Music Hall, 9036 Wilshire Blvd., Beverly Hills. Laemmle Town Center 5, 17200 Ventura Blvd., Encino. (310) 478-3836. laemmle.com.

A MICHAEL FEINSTEIN HOLIDAY CELEBRATION

Five-time Grammy nominee Michael Feinstein performs holiday classics from his album “A Michael Feinstein Christmas.” Feinstein has been called the “Ambassador of the Great American Songbook” for preserving and presenting the meld of old and new vocals. The crooner will belt out holiday classics, including “Sleigh Ride,” “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas” and “Santa Claus Is Coming to Town.” 8 p.m. $38-$98. Valley Performing Arts Center, 18111 Nordhoff St., Northridge. (818) 677-8800. valleyperformingartscenter.org.

DANIEL CAINER

Award-winning songwriter, storyteller and artist Daniel Cainer performs a one-man Shabbat concert. The London-based Cainer shows off of a knack for clever lyrics and sweet melodies as he sings about his childhood encounters with anti-Semitism, explores the tapestry that makes up family and how Judaism has changed over the years, and examines the enigma that is Israel. 9 p.m. dessert, 9:30 p.m. show. $20. Pico Union Project, 1153 Valencia St., Los Angeles. (213) 915-0084. picounionproject.org.

SAT DEC 9
FESTIVAL OF LIGHTS CELEBRATION

Enjoy games, crafts, music, food and more at this family-friendly event, which annually welcomes more than 500 local Eastsiders, including families with children, to the Silverlake Independent Jewish Community Center (SIJCC). Entertainment will include performances by the Hollow Trees, Sing With Sylvie, Stoli Magic, Ms. Hellen’s Silver Lake Ballet School, Love Bug & Me Music and students from the SIJCC’s Jewish Learning Center. Activities will include spinning top and wind chime craft booths, a “toddler zone,” reptile fun with the Critter Squad, animal balloon making, face painting and a doughnut-eating contest. The SIJCC also will hold a bake sale fundraiser, featuring food ranging from latkes and empanadas to brownies and cupcakes. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Children 2 and older, $15; adults, free. Silverlake Independent Jewish Community Center, 1110 Bates, Ave., Los Angeles. (Street parking only. Ride-sharing service, bicycling or public transportation highly recommended.) (323) 663-2255. sijcc.net.

“LET THERE BE WATER”

Seth Siegel, entrepreneur, water activist and New York Times best-selling author, will discuss whether the technology utilized in Israel is the key to helping solve global water needs. Siegel wrote the award-winning, international best-seller “Let There Be Water: Israel’s Solution for a Water-Starved World.” Free. Reservations required. 11:30 a.m. The Beverly Hills Hotel, 9641 Sunset Blvd., Beverly Hills. (310) 276-4246. beverlyhillsjc.org.

SUN DEC 10
WESTSIDE JCC 5K RUN AND WALK

Do good — and feel good doing it! More than 600 runners, walkers and volunteers of all ages are expected at the Westside Jewish Community Center’s second annual 5-kilometer run and walk. The certified, timed route and pet-friendly, stroller-friendly course is on the northwest lane of San Vicente Boulevard, between Olympic Boulevard and La Brea Avenue. A shortened kids’ fun run serves the community’s youngest members. There also will be a health and wellness expo with food, drinks, a kids’ fun zone and finish-line celebrations. Funds raised will benefit wellness programs at the Westside JCC, which serves seniors, special needs individuals, children and teens. Participants receive a bagel breakfast, gift bag, T-shirt and finisher’s medal. 6:30 a.m. (registration opens), 8 a.m. (5K run/walk), 9:30 a.m. (kids’ fun run). $35 (ages 18 and older), $25 (ages 5-17), $15 (fun run for kids), $20 (fan). Westside Jewish Community Center, 5870 W. Olympic Blvd., Los Angeles. (323) 556-5238. wizathon.com/wjcc5k.

HERITAGE SQUARE MUSEUM AND JEWISH DOWNTOWN L.A. WALKING TOUR

Docents Stephen Sass and Jeremy Sunderland will take guests, on foot and by mass transit, on a 2 1/2-mile tour from Union Station to sites of Jewish historic interest. Stops include Heritage Square Museum and the newly rebuilt Colonial Drug, operated for six decades by Jewish pharmacist George A. Simmons and family. Guests also will discover the role played by the Jewish community in the growth and development of El Pueblo de Nuestra Señora la Reina de Los Angeles. Sass is president of the Jewish Historical Society of Southern California; Sunderland is on the board of the Jewish Historical Society of Southern California and the Breed Street Shul Project. Sponsored by the Whizin Center for Continuing Education. $58. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Waiting list is available. Union Station, 800 N. Alameda St., Los Angeles. (310) 440-1572. wcce.aju.edu.

HANUKKAH FESTIVAL: LA/LA

Klezmer Juice

Guests of all ages can enjoy live music, dance, art and food at the Skirball Center. Latin-Jewish bands Klezmer Juice and Pan Felipe perform; dance ensembles Versa-Style and Mambo Inc. teach attendees salsa, cumbia, mambo and hip-hop moves; visual artist Sandy Rodriguez leads attendees in creating a visual art installation; Maite Gomez-Rejon, founder of Art Bites, teaches about Mexican chocolate and decorating chocolate gelt; and storytellers Mario Ibarra and Julia Garcia-Combs recount the age-old story of Hanukkah in English and Spanish. The museum’s current exhibitions, “Another Promised Land: Anita Brenner’s Mexico” and “Surface Tension by Ken Gonzales-Day: Murals, Signs and Mark-Making in L.A.” will be open. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. $12 (general), $9 (seniors, full-time students and children older than 12), $7 (children 2-12). Skirball Cultural Center, 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 440-4500. skirball.org.

HOLIDAY CONCERT IN BEVERLY HILLS

Enjoy the festive Hanukkah and holiday season sounds of the Beverly Hills Madrigals, the Beverly Hills Unified School District middle school choir and the fourth- and fifth-grade honors choir. Complimentary holiday refreshments provided by students from the Beverly Hills High Culinary Arts program. Presented by Friends of Beverly Gardens and the Beverly Hills Community Services Department. Free. 1-2:30 p.m. Beverly Gardens Park (near the lily pond), 9439 Santa Monica Blvd., Beverly Hills. beverlyhills.org/boldholidays.

NATHAN ENGLANDER

Novelist and short story writer Nathan Englander discusses his new book, “Dinner at the Center of the Earth,” a tragicomic take of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, with David Ulin, former editor of the Los Angeles Times books section. Join Wilshire Boulevard Temple for a conversation about Judaism, anti-Semitism, Israel and literature. A book sale, signing and a dessert reception follow. 7-10:30 p.m. Free. Wilshire Boulevard Temple, 11661 W. Olympic Blvd., Los Angeles. (213) 388-2401. wbtla.org.

MON DEC 11
“MARTIN BUBER: PHILOSOPHICAL, POLITICAL & SOCIAL REBEL”

Journalist Jonathan Dobrer explores the work of Martin Buber, one of the most important and influential modern Jewish philosophers who redefined Jewish thinking and bridged Chasidic spirituality with the secularism of Freud. Dobrer, an author of serious and humorous essays on contemporary culture, explores the question of what it means to consider Buber a dissident. 7:30 p.m. $20. American Jewish University, David Alan Shapiro Memorial Synagogue Center, 15600 Mulholland Drive, Los Angeles. (310) 476-9777. aju.edu.

TUE DEC 12
*INFINITE LIGHT*

On the first night of Hanukkah, young adult movement NuRoots kicks off its third annual citywide celebration of miracles. That evening’s event, “First Night,” is one party in two locations, with people on the Westside gathering at Bergamot Station and people on the Eastside at Conduit DTLA for a creative dining experience featuring Hanukkah-inspired craft cocktails, swag, music and more. Additionally, more than 30 events will take place through Dec. 22 as part of this Jewish Federation of Greater Los Angeles initiative, including “Latkes and Vodka,” “Get Lit Fashion Show,” “Ugly Sweater Party” and the flappers-themed party “The Great Gatsberg.” Organizations including East Side Jews, Moishe House, Bend the Arc and the National Council of Jewish Women/Los Angeles partner on various events. Through Dec. 22. 7:30 p.m., $30. Bergamot Station, 2525 Michigan Ave., Santa Monica. Conduit DTLA, 1635 N. Spring St., Los Angeles. (323) 761-8118. infinitelight.la.

MENORAH LIGHTINGS ON THIRD STREET PROMENADE

Join local synagogues and community groups as their members celebrate Hanukkah. Lighting the menorah begins shortly after sundown each evening. Participating synagogues include Mishkon Tephilo, Santa Monica Synagogue, Stephen Wise Temple, Kehillat Israel, Nashuva, Beth Shir Shalom and Chabad of Santa Monica. 4-8 p.m. Free. 1351 Third Street Promenade, Santa Monica. (310) 393-8355. santamonica.com/things-to-do/events.

WED DEC 13
DANIEL ELLSBERG

Whistleblower Daniel Ellsberg, who leaked the Pentagon Papers, a study of government decisions related to the Vietnam War, to the media when he was an analyst for the Rand Corp., discusses his new book, “The Doomsday Machine: Confessions of a Nuclear War Planner,” a nonfiction account of the nuclear arms race. The event takes place in a run-up to the January release of Steven Spielberg’s new film, “The Post,” in which Ellsberg is a key figure. 8 p.m. $20 (general admission), $30 (reserved seat), $45 (reserve seat plus book). William Turner Gallery, Bergamot Station Arts Center, 2525 Michigan Ave., Santa Monica. livetalksla.org.

THU DEC 14
LOS ANGELES CAR MENORAH PARADE

Honk if you love Hanukkah! On the third night of Hanukkah, Chabad-Lubavitch’s Yeshiva Ohr Elchonon Chabad, a seminary for Chabad high school students, celebrates the festival of lights by driving through the city in a caravan of celebration. Order an electric menorah to mount on top of your car and join the fun. Beep beep! 6:30 p.m. (lineup), 7 p.m. (departure). Start: Yeshiva Ohr Elchonon Chabad, 7215 Waring Ave., Los Angeles. Finish: Third Street and South Harper Avenue, Beverly Hills. To order a menorah for your car or for more information, call (410) 209-0545 or email yoecshluchim@gmail.com.

What’s Happening in Jewish L.A. Dec. 2-7: Holiday Music Mashup, Theater Classic With a Twist

The "Wish You Weren't Here" documentary focusing on anti-Israel activist Roger Waters will be screened on December 5.

SAT DEC 2
“A NEW HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS”

The Angel City Chorale (ACC) performs its 24th annual holiday concert and singalong. The concert will feature the world premiere of “Hanukkah Lullaby,” an original piece by ACC founder and artistic director Sue Fink and ACC choir member and songwriter Denny Wynbrandt. The work explores what it means to remain resilient during difficult times. Enjoy seasonal compositions and fully orchestrated holiday classics set to contemporary pop, R&B and a cappella music. 7 p.m. Also Dec. 3. at 7 p.m. $35 (adults), $32 (seniors 60 and older), $27 (children 5–12). Immanuel Presbyterian Church, 3300 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 943-9231. angelcitychorale.org.

HADAG NAHASH

Funky hip-hop grooves combined with flavors of rock, reggae and Middle Eastern music  separate  Hadag Nahash from the crowded Israeli music scene. The group features a full electric band, turntables, samples and lyrics about ending corruption and racism in Israeli society. It performs at American Jewish University with Mizrahi artist Hanan Ben Ari. 8 p.m. $45-$75. American Jewish University, Gindi Auditorium, 15600 Mulholland Drive, Los Angeles. (818) 483-8818. teevtix.com.

“THE MUSIC MAN”

The Jewish Women’s Repertory Company, musical theater performed exclusively by women and for women, presents Meredith Willson’s Tony-winning musical, “The Music Man.”   ,   For women only. A portion of the proceeds benefit the Jewish Family Service of Los Angeles’ Family Violence Project. 8 p.m. Also Dec. 3 at 1:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Presale: $25 (mezzanine), $30 (orchestra), $35 (center orchestra). Door: $30 (mezzanine), $35 (orchestra), $40 (center orchestra). Nate Holden Performing Arts Center, 4718 W. Washington Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 997-0598. jewishwomenstheater.com.

SUN DEC 3
LEARN LA

Rabbi Hershel Schachter

Rabbi Shay Schachter

Join Rabbis Hershel Schachter, Shay Schachter, Moshe Hauer, Zev Wiener, David Fohrman, Steven Pruzansky and Shlomo Einhorn as they discuss the role that Torah plays in our lives at the Orthodox Union’s West Coast Torah Convention. Also scheduled to speak at the conference are Michal Horowitz, Lou Shapiro, Charlie Harary, Geri Wiener and Racheli Luftglass. Free. 8:45 a.m. breakfast; Sessions run from 9:15 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. Baby-sitting available for children ages 1-4. Sponsored by Orthodox Union West Coast. Beth Jacob Congregation, 9030 W. Olympic Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 229-9000, ext. 201. ou.org.

“THE GRADUATE” SCREENING AND DISCUSSION  WITH AUTHOR

American Jewish University celebrates 50 years since the release of Mike Nichols’ groundbreaking 1967 comedy, starring Dustin Hoffman as a disillusioned college graduate who is seduced by Mrs. Robinson and falls for her daughter, all to the sounds of Simon & Garfunkel. Beverly Gray, author of “Seduced by Mrs. Robinson: How ‘The Graduate’ Became the Touchstone of a Generation,” participates in a post-screening discussion. Gray’s book places the movie in a historical context, offers a look into the making of the iconic film and explains why it has had an impact on popular culture. 3 p.m. $12 (reserved), $18 (premium). American Jewish University, 15600 Mulholland Drive, Los Angeles. (310) 476-9777. wcce.aju.edu.

“1917: A TURNING POINT IN AMERICAN JEWISH HISTORY”

Hasia Diner, a professor of American-Jewish history at New York University, discusses the impact America’s entry into World War I had on American Jews, most of whom rallied to the nation’s cause. Organized by the Jewish Genealogical Society of the Conejo Valley and Ventura County. 1:30 p.m. Free. Temple Adat Elohim, 2420 E. Hillcrest Drive, Thousand Oaks. (805) 497-7101. adatelohim.org.

“A NIGHT OF MIRACLES”

The Los Angeles Jewish Symphony performs a musical mashup of old and new Hanukkah music at Wilshire Boulevard Temple’s Koreatown campus. Actors Philip Casnoff and Roxanne Hart deliver readings of stories of modern Jewish miracles. Artist Karen Hart performs her acclaimed “Judah and His Maccabees: A Hanukkah Gospel Story.” A jelly doughnut reception follows. Suitable for all ages. 4 p.m. Free (RSVP appreciated). Wilshire Boulevard Temple, Glazer Campus, 3663 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (213) 388-2401. wbtla.org/miracles

WORLD KINDERTRANSPORT DAY

The event marks the anniversary of the first Kindertransport arrival in England carrying children fleeing the Holocaust. Speakers will honor those who worked to make the Kindertransport possible, including Holocaust rescuer Varian Fry, as well ats volunteers who work today in refugee camps in Turkey and Greece. Light refreshments will be served. 7 p.m. Free. Colony Theater, 555 . Third St., Burbank. kindertransport.org/events.aspx.

MON DEC 4
AUTHOR LAURA ROSENZWEIG

Laura Rosenzweig will talk at Stephen Wise Temple about her book, “Hollywood’s Spies: The Undercover Surveillance of Nazis in Los Angeles,” which tells the long-untold story of American-Jewish resistance to Nazism during the 1930s and the role that Jewish Hollywood played in combatting this threat to democracy. From 1934 to 1941, Louis B. Mayer, Jack Warner and the other Jewish executives of Hollywood secretly paid private investigators to infiltrate Nazi groups operating in Los Angeles. For seven years, Hollywood’s spies infiltrated the German-American Bund and its nativist, Nazi-influenced allies, reporting on seditious plots and collusion with the German government. 7:30 p.m. $15 for Stephen Wise members, $20 nonmembers. Stephen Wise Temple, 15500 Stephen S. Wise Drive, Los Angeles. (888) 380-9473. wisela.org.

YIDDISH ZING ALONG

Yiddish folksinger Cindy Paley turns Encino into the old country as she performs old and new Yiddish folk songs at Valley Beth Shalom. Clarinetist Zinovy Soro, violinist Miamon Miller, accordionist Isaac Sadigursky and guitarist and vocalist Menachem Mirski accompany Paley. Song sheets and refreshments provided.  7 p.m. $18. Valley Beth Shalom, 15739 Ventura Blvd., Encino. (213) 389-8880. cindy-vbs.brownpapertickets.com.

TUE DEC 5
“WISH YOU WEREN’T HERE”

In a new documentary, investigative journalist Ian Halperin examines former Pink Floyd member and anti-Israel activist Roger Waters, a supporter of the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement against Israel. Waters has called on artists from Radiohead to Nick Cave to participate in a cultural boycott against Israel. Borrowing its title from the Pink Floyd classic “Wish You Were Here,” the film places Waters’ actions in the context of the rise of global anti-Semitism. The filmmaker participates in a post-screening discussion and Q-and-A with entertainment industry community members, including Spirit Music Group CEO and Creative Community for Peace co-founder David Renzer, Electronic Arts Music Group executive Steve Schnur and attorney David Lande. Film producer Richard Trank moderates the panel. 7 p.m. $10. Museum of Tolerance, 9786 W. Pico Blvd., Los Angeles. creativecommunityforpeace.com/wish-you-werent-here.

WED DEC 6
DIPLOMAT RON PROSOR

Ron Prosor, one of Israel’s most distinguished diplomats, talks with Rabbi David Woznica on a wide range of topics of interest to Israel and Jewish people outside of Israel: the United States and the international community; the inner workings of the world of diplomacy; and some of his most memorable moments on the world stage. Prosor served as vice president of the United Nations’ General Assembly, chair of the U.N. Human Rights Committee, Israel’s ambassador to the United Kingdom, and director-general  of Israel’s foreign ministry. Free. Registration required. 6:45 p.m. reception, 7:15 p.m. program. Stephen Wise Temple, 15500 Stephen S. Wise Drive, Los Angeles. (888) 380-9473. wisela.org.

“HOW DID BARACK OBAMA CREATE HIMSELF?”

Barack Obama was president of the United States for eight years, and the broad outlines of his story — his Hawaiian birth, his fatherless childhood, his education at elite institutions, his work as a community organizer and politician in Chicago — are now familiar elements of American history. David J. Garrow, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of “Rising Star: The Making of Barack Obama,” discusses with Warren Olney how Obama retains a remarkable mystique and can seem unknowable. Free (RSVP required). 6:30 p.m. (check-in). 7:30 p.m. National Center for the Preservation of Democracy, 111 N. Central Ave., Los Angeles. zocalopublicsquare.org.

THU DEC 7
“THE SUPREME COURT: WHAT’S NEXT? AN INSIDER’S VIEW”

George Washington University law professor Jeffrey Rosen, president and CEO of the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia and a regular commentator on National Public Radio, will discuss the U.S. Supreme Court, the death of Justice Antonin Scalia, then-President Barack Obama’s nominee Merrick Garland, and the recent nomination and confirmation of Neil Gorsuch. Presented by One Day University. Registration required. $69. 7 p.m. Wilshire Ebell Theatre, 4401 W. Eighth St., Los Angeles. (800) 300-3438. onedayu.com.

RITA RUDNER AT PEPPERDINE

Rita Rudner. Photo courtesy of Jeff Abraham

Stand-up comedian and best-selling author Rita Rudner often alludes to her Jewish upbringing in her act. Don’t miss an evening with the funny lady who claims to have the longest-running solo comedy show in Las Vegas history. 8 p.m. $40-$75. Smothers Theatre, Pepperdine University, 24255 Pacific Coast Highway, Malibu. (310) 506-4522. arts.pepperdine.edu/events/rita-rudner.htm.

Holiday Preview 2017 Calendar

James Franco's "The Disaster Artist" can be seen in theaters on December 1.

SUN NOV 26
BILL NYE

Scientist, engineer, comedian, author and inventor Bill Nye appears in Beverly Hills as part of the Distinguished Speakers Series of Southern California. Nye, who currently can be seen on Netflix’s “Bill Nye Saves the World,” discusses his fascination with how things work, his celebrated career — he began as a comedy writer and performer on a Seattle ensemble comedy show and broke through with his Emmy-winning “Bill Nye the Science Guy” — and inspiring life lessons on the importance of education. 7 p.m. Tickets start at $260. Saban Theatre, 8440 Wilshire Blvd., Beverly Hills. (310) 546-6222. sabantheatre.org.

THU NOV 30
100 YEARS OF BUDDY RICH

The Grammy Museum commemorates the life and legacy of Jewish-American jazz drumming legend Buddy Rich, who was born in 1917 and collaborated with towering talents ranging from Frank Sinatra to Thelonious Monk. The evening features a Q-and-A with his only child, Cathy Rich; Gregg Potter, the drummer for the current incarnation of the Buddy Rich Band; and Red Hot Chili Peppers drummer Chad Smith, whose playing has been influenced by Rich. A special live performance follows the conversation. 7 p.m. (doors), 7:30 p.m. (show). $20. Grammy Museum L.A., 800 W. Olympic Blvd., Los Angeles. (213) 765-6800. grammymuseum.org.

MICHAEL CHABON AND ZADIE SMITH

The two literary heavyweights participate in a conversation. Chabon is a Jewish author known for the Pulitzer-winning “The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay,” and Smith is an Brit of Jamaican descent whose debut novel, “White Teeth,” garnered critical acclaim. They may not seem as if they have much in common, but the novelists’ latest works — “Moonglow” and “Swing Time,” respectively — explore the influence of family, cultural heritage and politics in shaping identity. 8 p.m. $15 students; $29-$59 general. Royce Hall, UCLA, 340 Royce Drive, Los Angeles. (310) 825-4401. cap.ucla.edu.

FRI DEC 1
“WONDER WHEEL”

Writer-director Woody Allen’s latest film is set in Coney Island in the 1950s, following a lifeguard, played by Justin Timberlake, who tells the story of a middle-aged carousel operator and his beleaguered wife. When the wife and the operator’s estranged daughter fall in love with the lifeguard, problems ensue. Jim Belushi, Juno Temple and Kate Winslet co-star. Various theaters. wonderwheelmovie.com.

“THE DISASTER ARTIST”

James Franco directs and stars in this acclaimed look at the making of Tommy Wiseau’s “The Room,” the real-life cult classic considered the “Citizen Kane” of bad movies. An adaptation of a nonfiction book of the same name, “The Disaster Artist” follows Wiseau, an aspiring filmmaker who pursued his dream of making it big in Hollywood against insurmountable odds. Franco’s younger brother Dave; Seth Rogen; Alison Brie and Ari Graynor co-star. Various theaters. a24films.com/films/the-disaster-artist.

SAT DEC 2
HADAG NAHASH

Funky hip-hop grooves with rock, reggae and Middle Eastern flavors set apart Hadag Nahash in the crowded Israeli music scene. The group features a full electric band, turntables, samples and lyrics about ending corruption and racism in Israeli society. The group performs at American Jewish University with Mizrahi artist Hanan Ben Ari. 8:30 p.m. $45-$75. American Jewish University, Gindi Auditorium, 15600 Mulholland Drive, Los Angeles. (818) 483-8818. teevtix.com.

THU DEC 7
RITA RUDNER

Stand-up comedian and best-selling author Rita Rudner often alludes to her Jewish upbringing in her act. Don’t miss an evening with the funny lady who claims to have the longest-running solo comedy show in Las Vegas’ history. 8 p.m. $40-$75. Smothers Theatre, Pepperdine University, 24255 Pacific Coast Highway, Malibu. (310) 506-4522. arts.pepperdine.edu/events/rita-rudner.htm.

FRI DEC 8
“BIG SONIA”

Holocaust survivor. Grandma. Diva. Big Sonia. Director Leah Warshawski’s documentary film follows her octogenarian grandmother, Sonia Warshawski, a Holocaust survivor who runs the last store in a defunct shopping mall, a tailor shop she’s owned for more than 30 years. When Sonia, one of the last remaining survivors in Kansas City, is given an eviction notice, the specter of retirement forces her to confront her harrowing past, which includes concentration camps and death marches. The film weaves Sonia’s current conflict with stories about her diva-like personality from family and friends. Various times. Laemmle Music Hall, 9036 Wilshire Blvd., Beverly Hills. Laemmle Town Center 5, 17200 Ventura Blvd., Encino. (310) 478-3836. laemmle.com.

A MICHAEL FEINSTEIN HOLIDAY CELEBRATION

Michael Feinstein.

Five-time Grammy nominee Michael Feinstein performs holiday classics from his album “A Michael Feinstein Christmas.” Feinstein has been called the “Ambassador of the Great American Songbook” for preserving and presenting the meld of old and new vocals. The crooner will belt out holiday classics including “Sleigh Ride,” “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas” and “Santa Claus Is Coming to Town.” 8 p.m. $38-$98. Valley Performing Arts Center, 18111 Nordhoff St., Northridge. (818) 677-8800. valleyperformingartscenter.org.

SUN DEC 10
HANUKKAH FESTIVAL: LA/LA

All ages enjoy live music, dance, art and food at the Skirball Center. Latin-Jewish bands Klezmer Juice and Pan Felipe perform; dance ensembles Versa-Style and Mambo Inc. teach attendees salsa, cumbia, mambo and hip-hop moves; visual artist Sandy Rodriguez leads attendees in creating a visual art installation; Maite Gomez-Rejon, founder of Art Bites, teaches about Mexican chocolate and decorating chocolate gelt; and storytellers Mario Ibarra and Julia Garcia-Combs recount the age-old story of Chanukah in English and Spanish. The museum’s current exhibitions, “Another Promised Land: Anita Brenner’s Mexico” and “Surface Tension by Ken Gonzales-Day: Murals, Signs and Mark-Making in L.A.” will be open. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. $12 (general), $9 (seniors, full-time students and children older than 12), $7 (children 2-12). Skirball Cultural Center, 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 440-4500. skirball.org.

WED DEC 13
DANIEL ELLSBERG

Whistleblower Daniel Ellsberg, who leaked the Pentagon Papers, a study of government decisions related to the Vietnam War, to the media when he was an analyst for the Rand Corp., discusses his new book, “The Doomsday Machine: Confessions of a Nuclear War Planner,” a nonfiction account of the nuclear arms race. The event takes place in a run-up to the January release of Steven Spielberg’s new film, “The Post,” in which Ellsberg is a key figure. 8 p.m. $20 (general admission), $30 (reserved seat), $45 (reserve seat plus book). William Turner Gallery, Bergamot Station Arts Center, 2525 Michigan Ave., Santa Monica. livetalksla.org.

SAT DEC 16
KLEZMATICS

Renowned klezmer band the Klezmatics perform a “Happy Joyous Hanukkah” concert at the Valley Performing Arts Center. The evening is a celebration of Yiddish culture at a time of year when candles and family warm the dark nights. The event embraces audiences of all cultures and backgrounds. 8 p.m. $33-$68. Valley Performing Arts Center, 18111 Nordhoff St., Northridge. (818) 677-8800. valleyperformingartscenter.org.

WED DEC 20
BARRY MANILOW

American singer-songwriter Barry Manilow, whose more than five-decade career has spanned hits including “Mandy,” “Can’t Smile Without You” and “Copacabana,” performs “A Very Barry Christmas.” He will sing holiday standards, including “I’m Dreaming of a White Christmas.” 7:30 p.m. $39-$216. The Forum, 3900 W. Manchester Blvd., Inglewood. ticketmaster.com.

What’s Happening in Jewish L.A. Nov. 24-30: A Love Story, Live Comedy and Timely Discussions

The film "1945" is being screened on Sunday November 26.

FRI NOV 24
“CALL ME BY YOUR NAME”

This acclaimed film is a love story about a precocious 17-year-old boy and his professor father’s graduate student intern who bond over their sexuality, Jewish heritage and the northern Italian landscape. Timothée Chalamet plays the boy, Elio, who spends his days reading, playing piano and flirting with his girlfriend until he meets Oliver, who has come to stay at the family’s villa for the summer while working for Elio’s father. Armie Hammer (“The Social Network”) and Michael Stuhlbarg (“Boardwalk Empire”) co-star in producer Howard Rosenman and Italian director Luca Guadagnino’s adaptation of a 2007 novel of the same name. Various theaters. sonyclassics.com/callmebyyourname.

ERIC SCHWARTZ

Comedian and rapper Eric Schwartz draws on “Weird Al” Yankovic, Eminem and his love of pop culture and Judaism in parodies including “Honika Electronica” and “Crank That Kosha Boy.” The Jewish performer, also known by his hip-hop alter-ego Smooth-E, brings the funny to the intimate Flappers Comedy Club in Burbank. 8 and 10 p.m.; 8 and 10 p.m. Saturday; $20. Flappers Comedy Club, 102 E. Magnolia, Burbank. (818) 845-9721. flapperscomedy.com.

SUN NOV 26
“1945”

Hungarian film director Ferenc Torok’s black-and-white film is set in a Hungarian village in 1945 in the aftermath of the Holocaust. Adapted from an acclaimed short story, the film unfolds as an Orthodox man and his adult son show up at the village. The townspeople believe the Jews are the heirs of the village’s deported Jews and expect the worst. The Los Angeles Jewish Film Festival sponsors the screening. A post-screening discussion features Torok in conversation with Holocaust scholar Michael Berenbaum. The film is a production of Menemsha Films. 5:35 p.m. $13 (general), $11 (seniors). Laemmle Royal, 11523 Santa Monica Blvd., Los Angeles. (800) 838-3006. lajfilmfest.org.

OZOMATLI

The socially conscious Los Angeles band that features Latino and Jewish members and blends Latin, hip-hop and rock music performs at The Canyon in Agoura Hills. 6 p.m. (doors open), 7 p.m. (opener), 9 p.m. (headliner). $28, $38, $48. The Canyon, 28912 Roadside Drive, Agoura Hills. (888) 645-5006. wheremusicmeetsthesoul.com.

MON NOV 27
U.N. RESOLUTION 181 ANNIVERSARY

Commemorating the 70th anniversary of U.N. Resolution 181 — also known as the Partition Plan — which called for the partition of Palestine into Arab and Jewish states, the Mensch Foundation presents its Mensch Award to Sinai Temple Rabbi Emeritus Zvi Dershowitz, professor Michael Berenbaum, Zane Buzby and Meir Fenigstein. A panel discussion on the resolution includes Berenbaum, professor Judea Pearl, professor Michael Bazyler, Rabbi Moshe Kushman and professor Stanley Goldman. After the awards presentation, Israeli-American actor Mike Burstyn delivers a dramatic reading of Resolution 181. 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Sinai Temple, 10400 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (760) 416-3685. menschfoundation.org.

“AND THEN THEY CAME FOR US”

Abby Ginzberg and Ken Schneider’s documentary film about the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II makes its Los Angeles premiere. In the film, actor and LGBT activist George Takei and many others who were incarcerated tell their stories and speak out against the Muslim registry and the travel ban. A reception and a post-screening discussion follows with the filmmakers and Ahilan Arulanantham, legal director at the ACLU of Southern California, moderated by Marya Bangee, CEO of Sila Consulting. 7 p.m. $25. Downtown Independent Theater, 251 S. Main St., Los Angeles. (213) 617-1033. thentheycamedoc.com.

“AMERICAN CONSERVATISM AND THE REPUBLICAN PARTY IN THE TRUMP ERA”

Bruce Bialosky.

Republican columnist Bruce Bialosky, Republican Jewish Coalition former executive director Larry Greenfield and author and political strategist Arnold Steinberg, a contributing editor to The American Spectator,  participate in a  panel discussion moderated by Valley Beth Shalom Rabbi Ed Feinstein. 7:30 p.m. Free. Valley Beth Shalom, 15739 Ventura Blvd., Encino. (818) 788-6000. vbs.org.

TUE NOV 28
JNF BREAKAST FOR ISRAEL

The Jewish National Fund’s annual Los Angeles breakfast for Israel explores “Media Bias and Israel.” Guest speakers include author and radio commentator Larry Elder, Haaretz U.S. editor and correspondent Chemi Shalev, and Consul General of Israel in Los Angeles Sam Grundwerg. 7:30-9 a.m. Free (RSVP required). The Beverly Hilton, 9876 Wilshire Blvd., Beverly Hills. (323) 964-1400. jnf.org/labreakfast.

WED NOV 29
“THE DREAM OF 33 VOTES” AND GOLDA MEIR

A community program commemorates the 100-year anniversary of the Balfour Declaration, the 70-year anniversary of the U.N. Partition Resolution and the almost 70-year anniversary of the birth of the Jewish state. The event features historic video clips, music, the Harkham Hillel Hebrew Academy choir and remarks by Rabbi David Wolpe. After the program, author Francine Klagsbrun appears in conversation with Wolpe about her 2017 book, “Lioness: Golda Meir and the Nation of Israel.” A book sale and signing follow. Community program: 6:30-7:30 p.m. Book discussion: 7:30 p.m. Free for Sinai Temple members, others $25. Sinai Temple, 10400 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 481-3228. sinaitemple.org.

MIZRAHI COMMEMORATION

Rachel Moreh.

UCLA alumna Rachel Moreh from the Israel Consulate and Manny Dahari, a recent refugee from Yemen and a Yeshiva University student, discuss what happened to the Jewish communities in Arab countries in the wake of the founding of the State of Israel. Organized by JIMENA (Jews Indigenous to the Middle East and North Africa) and Students Supporting Israel. Light snacks and refreshments will be served. 7-9:30 p.m. Free. Hillel at UCLA, 574 Hilgard Ave., Los Angeles. bit.ly/mizrahicommemoration2017.

THU NOV 30
“JEWS AND THE AMERICAN PRESIDENCY”

Los Angeles political scholar Raphael Sonenshein delivers a lecture on “Jews and the American Presidency: The Bushes, Clinton and Obama.” He examines how the respective presidencies have been consequential to Jews in the United States and around the world, and discusses how the relationship between American presidents and Jewish communities have been vital to the American system of government and the conditions under which Jews live. Sponsored by Hillside Memorial Park and Mortuary. 7:30 p.m. $18. American Jewish University, David Alan Shapiro Memorial Synagogue Center, 15600 Mulholland Drive, Los Angeles. (310) 476-9777. wcce.aju.edu.

“NEW MEDIA JEWS”

Yiddish Book Center Academic Director Joshua Lambert examines the rise of Jews and Judaism in today’s media, including on streaming platforms, in his lecture titled, “New Media Jews: ‘Transparent,’ Podcasting and the Place of Jews in 21st Century American Culture.” Lambert proposes that the current wave of Jewish culture is resulting from two key developments: the increasing institutionalization of Jewish culture in America since the late 20th century and the affinity between streaming media technology and demographic minorities. UCLA faculty member Lia Brozgal moderates. 4 p.m. Free. UCLA Faculty Center, 480 Charles E. Young Drive, Los Angeles. (310) 825-5955. csw.ucla.edu.

THE 7TH ANNUAL PROFESSOR GERALD B. BUBIS LECTURE

Israeli journalist and author Amir Tibon discusses “An Israeli Reporter in Trump’s Washington.”  Tibon, Washington, D.C., correspondent for Haaretz and co-author of the 2017 book “The Last Palestinian: The Rise and Reign of Mahmoud Abbas,” appears at Valley Beth Shalom as part of Americans for Peace Now’s annual Gerald B. Bubis lecture. A conversation with Valley Beth Shalom Rabbi Ed Feinstein follows the talk. 7 p.m. Free (RSVP requested). Valley Beth Shalom, 15739 Ventura Blvd., Encino. (323) 934-3480. vbs.org.

ANAT COHEN TENTET

Israel’s hottest clarinet virtuoso and her ensemble perform. Anat Cohen’s sounds capture many genres, including modern and traditional jazz, classical music, klezmer, Brazilian choro and Argentine tango. 8 p.m. $33-$78. Valley Performing Arts Center, 18111 Nordhoff St., Northridge. (818) 677-8800. valleyperformingartscenter.org.

MICHAEL CHABON AND ZADIE SMITH

The two literary heavyweights participate in a conversation. Chabon is a Jewish author known for the Pulitzer Prize-winning “The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay,” and Smith is a Brit of Jamaican descent whose debut novel, “White Teeth,” garnered critical acclaim. Chabon’s and Smith’s latest works — “Moonglow” and “Swing Time,” respectively — explore the influence of family, cultural heritage and politics in shaping identity. 8 p.m. $29-$59. Royce Hall, UCLA, 340 Royce Drive, Los Angeles. (310) 825-4401. cap.ucla.edu.

For more events in Jewish L.A., visit http://jewishjournal.com/calendar/.

What’s Happening in Jewish L.A. Nov. 16-23: Vulture Festival, Dennis Prager and ‘War of the Worlds’

FRI NOV 17
“WHY JUDAISM MATTERS”

During a Kabbalat Shabbat service, Temple Israel of Hollywood Rabbi John Rosove discusses his new book, “Why Judaism Matters: Letters of a Liberal Rabbi to His Children and the Millennial Generation.” Rosove’s work, presented in the form of letters from a rabbi to his sons, is a guidebook for Reform Jews who find it difficult to engage with Jewish orthodoxy, beliefs, traditions and issues in the 21st century. A dinner follows services and the discussion. 6:30 p.m. Free. (RSVP required for dinner). Temple Israel of Hollywood, 7300 Hollywood Blvd., Los Angeles. (323) 876-8330. tioh.org.

“BERNSTEIN ON STAGE”

John Mauceri conducts the New West Symphony in an evening of the music of Leonard Bernstein, honoring the centennial of the famed composer’s birth. The concert will also feature the Gay Men’s Chorus of Los Angeles, the Women of Areté Vocal Ensemble, the California Lutheran University Choir, Suzanna Guzmán, Davis Gaines, Celena Shafer and Casey Candebat. 8 p.m. Tickets $58–$73. Valley Performing Arts Center, 18111 Nordhoff St., Northridge. Also 8 p.m., Nov. 18, Thousand Oaks Civic Arts Plaza, 2100 Thousand Oaks Blvd., Thousand Oaks; 3 p.m., Nov. 19, Oxnard Performing Arts Center, 800 Hobson Way, Oxnard. (818) 677-3000. valleyperformingartscenter.org.

GRATITUDE SHABBAT: CELEBRATING UNITY AND THANKSGIVING

Wilshire Boulevard Temple brings together its Rabbi Susan Nanus, the American Jewish University Choir led by conductor Noreen Green, and the BYTHAX Gospel Choir led by composer, vocalist and conductor Diane White Clayton in a joint Shabbat concert that mixes poetry, prayer and song. A community Shabbat celebration follows. 7:30 p.m. Free. Wilshire Boulevard Temple, Glazer Campus, 3663 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (213) 388-2401. wbtla.org.

“A FUNNY THING HAPPENED ON THE WAY TO THE FORUM”

Comedy — tonight! An ancient Roman slave tries to gain his freedom by helping his master woo a young woman in the bawdy farce “A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum,” with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and a book by Burt Shevelove and Larry Gelbart. Ancient Rome is turned on its ear in this raucous Tony Award-winning musical featuring mistaken identity and dizzying plot twists. (Intended for adult audiences; may contain adult language and situations.) 8 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays; 2 p.m. Saturdays; 3 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Sundays. Through Dec. 31. Tickets $45–$52. Garry Marshall Theatre, 4252 W. Riverside Drive, Burbank. (818) 955-8101. garrymarshalltheatre.org.

SAT NOV 18
VULTURE FESTIVAL L.A.

Sarah Silverman

James Franco.

Lena Dunham.

Natalie Portman.

Hollywood Jews, including Sarah Silverman, James Franco, Lena Dunham, Natalie Portman, Damon Lindelof, Eugene Levy, Rachel Bloom and Joshua Malina are among the stars appearing at this two-day festival in Hollywood. From a panel on “Stranger Things”: Inside the Upside Down, to a discussion with the women behind HBO’s “Girls” on The Panel of Their Generation (or at least a panel of a generation), this is the ultimate festival for any pop-culture fan. Organized by politics and culture magazine Vulture. Through Nov. 19. 11 a.m. Saturday–9 p.m. Sunday. Various prices. The Hollywood Roosevelt, 7000 Hollywood Blvd., Los Angeles. vulturefestival.com.

“WAR OF THE WORLDS”

The Los Angeles Philharmonic, featuring Israeli-American opera director Yuval Sharon, up-and-coming Jewish composer Annie Gosfield, and members of the L.A. Phil New Music Group, re-creates Orson Welles’ 1938 original radio script, incorporating Gosfield’s satellite and machine and industrial sounds. Admission to the concert includes entry into “Noon to Midnight,” which lets attendees roam Walt Disney Concert Hall for a day of pop-up performances featuring L.A.’s top new-music ensembles. Noon, 2 p.m. $25-$58. Walt Disney Concert Hall, 111. S. Grand Ave., Los Angeles. (323) 850-2000. laphil.com.

DENNIS PRAGER

Nationally syndicated radio host and New York Times best-selling author Dennis Prager will discuss “Supporting Israel and Maintaining Conservative Traditional Values in America’s Contemporary Cultural Climate” during a special Shabbat morning service. After the service, the founder of Prager U will participate in a Q-and-A session over a catered lunch. Childcare available. Seating is limited. 9:30 a.m. $40 members, $60 nonmembers. Sephardic Temple Tifereth Israel, 10500 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 475-7000. sephardictemple.org.

SUN NOV 19
“NAZISM IN THE U.S.”

Beth Ribet, who holds a doctorate in social relations from UC Irvine and a law degree from UCLA, discusses Nazism in American institutions and history, its relationship to white supremacy and what it means today. Attendees explore opportunities to mobilize and respond. Coffee and bagels served. Co-sponsored by Sholem Community and LGBT congregation Beth Chayim Chadashim. 10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Free. Westside Neighborhood School, 5401 Beethoven St., Los Angeles. (310) 984-6935. sholem.org.

MAAGALIM CYCLING EVENT

Israeli and Jewish families with special-needs children come together for a day of cycling, karate, fitness, pumpkin decorating and more. Professional cyclists will
provide instruction to those who have never ridden a bike. Israeli Scouts (Tzofim) will attend and partner with kids with special needs. Organized by Maagalim, a new organization aiming to provide more opportunities for inclusion for special-needs families. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. IAC Shepher Community Center, 6530 Winnetka Ave., Woodland Hills. (818) 288-8108. maagalimcircles.org.

“HITLER, MY NEIGHBOR: MEMOIRS OF A JEWISH CHILDHOOD, 1929-1939”

Historian Edgar Feuchtwanger participates in a talk and book signing for “Hitler, My Neighbor: Memories of a Jewish Childhood, 1929-1939.” The book is Feuchtwanger’s account of being a young boy from a prominent German-Jewish family in Munich when Nazi party leader Adolf Hitler moves into the building across the street. The boy watches from his window as terrible events unfold. 3 p.m. Free (RSVP required). Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust, 100 S. The Grove Drive, Los Angeles. (323) 651-3704. lamoth.org.

CAROL LEIFER AND WENDY LIEBMAN

The two headliners at Whizin’s Stand-Up Comedy Showcase have starred in comedy specials on HBO, Showtime and Comedy Central. Carol Leifer is a four-time Emmy Award nominee for her writing on “Seinfeld,” “The Larry Sanders Show” and “Saturday Night Live.” Wendy Liebman has performed on late-night shows hosted by Johnny Carson, David Letterman, Jay Leno, Jimmy Fallon and Jimmy Kimmel, and was a semifinalist on “America’s Got Talent.” 4 p.m. $25. David Alan Shapiro Memorial Synagogue Center, American Jewish University, 15600 Mulholland Drive, Los Angeles. (310) 476-9777. wcce.aju.edu.

“E.T. THE EXTRA TERRESTRIAL IN CONCERT”

American Youth Symphony (AYS), a laboratory for skilled high school musicians, performs John Williams’ legendary score for “E.T. The Extra Terrestrial,” accompanying a screening of the iconic Steven Spielberg film. AYS Music Director Carlos Izcaray and conductor Jon Burlingame lead the symphony. The event features a Q-and-A with industry leaders, moderated by Burlingame. 4:30 p.m. $11-$15. Royce Hall, UCLA, 10745 Dickson Court, Los Angeles. (310) 470-2332. aysymphony.org.

MON NOV 20
“NIGHT OF 80 SHABBATS”

Today is the final day to register as a host for the Builders of Jewish Education’s (BJE) “Night of 80 Shabbats” on Dec. 1, when
Shabbat dinners are served in homes across Los Angeles. The initiative marks the 80th anniversary of BJE. Young adults and millennials who host a dinner could be eligible to receive $10 per person in food expenses, up to $150, from One Table, which brings Shabbat to people of all backgrounds who are in their 20s and 30s (restrictions apply). For additional information, visit bjela.org/night-80-shabbats-0.

REZA ASLAN AND RABBI SARAH BASSIN

Join Reza Aslan, best-selling author of “Zealot,” and Rabbi Sarah Bassin of Temple Emanuel of Beverly Hills as they discuss God and the concept of the divine, from prehistoric times to today. Part of the Behrendt Conversation Series, in partnership with Chevalier Books. A copy of Aslan’s new book, “God: A Human History,” is included with the price of admission. 7 p.m. $25 online; $35 at the door. Temple Emanuel of Beverly Hills, Corwin Family Sanctuary, 300 N. Clark Drive, Beverly Hills. (310) 288-3737. tebh.org.

INTERFAITH THANKSGIVING SERVICE

Seven congregations comprising the Pacific Palisades Ministerial Association, including Reconstructionist synagogue Kehillat Israel, participate in an annual evening of prayer, music, readings, meditation and fellowship. A patio reception with hot beverages and other refreshments follows. 7 p.m. Free. Self-Realization Fellowship Lake Shrine Temple, 17190 Sunset Blvd., Pacific Palisades. (310) 459-2328. ourki.org.

“SUDDENLY, A KNOCK AT THE DOOR”

Writer Eitan Katzen is visited by a bearded man, a survey taker and a pizza delivery woman in this original play by Robin Goldfin, based on stories by award-winning Israeli author and filmmaker Etgar Keret. Brandishing weapons, these visitors hold the writer hostage and demand a story. For these three strange muses, Katzen begins to weave his tales, played out on the stage by the same characters holding him captive. The staged reading is directed by Jeff Maynard. Free with RSVP required. 8 p.m. Lenart Auditorium, Fowler Museum at UCLA, 308 Charles E. Young Drive North, Los Angeles. (310) 208-3081, ext. 108. international.ucla.edu/institute.

For more events in Jewish L.A., visit http://jewishjournal.com/calendar/.

What’s Happening in Jewish L.A. Nov. 3-9: Food, Faith and Field, Sephardic Film Fest and More

Nov. 5: "FOOD, FAITH AND FIELD"

SAT NOV 4
LEV EISHA SHABBAT

A joyous community of Jewish women led by Lev Eisha founding Rabbi Toba August, musical educator and recording artist Cindy Paley, and performing artist Joy Krauthammer comes together to celebrate. A Kiddush follows. 9:30 a.m. to noon. Free. Lev Eisha at Temple Beth Shir Shalom, 1827 Santa Monica Blvd., Santa Monica. (310) 575-0985. leveisha.org.

“ANNIE KORZEN FAMOUS ACTRESS”

Actress Annie Korzen, best known for her role on “Seinfeld” as Del Boca Vista retiree Doris Klompus, performs her solo show for Jewish Women’s Theatre. Korzen takes the audience on a journey through her life onstage and off, juxtaposing her status as a bit player in films and television with being a divalike leading lady in her son’s life. Extended through Nov. 19. 8 p.m. Thursday and Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday. $40 in advance, $45 at the door. The Braid, 2912 Colorado Ave., No. 102, Santa Monica. (310) 315-1400. jewishwomenstheatre.org.

SHABBAT SHIUR

On Shabbat, Eli Beer, founding president of United Hatzalah of Israel, leads an afternoon class. Hatzalah of Israel is Israel’s all-volunteer emergency medical first-responders’ organization. A Hatzalah ambulance will be on display for kids. 12:30 p.m. Free. Valley Beth Shalom, 15739 Ventura Blvd., Encino. (818) 788-6000. vbs.org.

SUN NOV 5
“FOOD, FAITH AND FIELD”

Faith-based food justice organization Netiya holds its second annual “Food, Faith and Field,” a multifaith symposium connecting spiritual practice with responsible land use. Panel discussions include “Food Relief or Food Justice?” “Faith-Based Stewardship: Agrarian Theology” and “Earth-Based Wisdom: Applying Spiritual and Environmental Stewardship.” Roundtable discussions examine “Land and Health: Healing Your Land and Spirit,” “Climate Change: What Your Congregation Can Do” and more. Speakers include Netiya founding Executive Director Devorah Brous, activist Helena Norberg-Hodge and former Jewish Journal Editor-in-Chief Rob Eshman. Mary MacVean, former Mind & Body editor at the Los Angeles Times, will moderate a Q-and-A. Planned demonstration topics include how to start and cultivate a garden, and how to reap a harvest. Eco-friendly art will be on display. 3-7 p.m. $35. Temple Israel of Hollywood, 7300 Hollywood Blvd., Los Angeles. (213) 761-5111. netiya.org.

14TH ANNUAL L.A. SEPHARDIC FILM FESTIVAL

Through the art of cinema, the weeklong event depicts the Sephardic Jewish experience from Tunisia, Israel, France, Iraq and Morocco. The opening gala features an awards ceremony, dinner and the screening of the 2012 Israeli film “Back to Casablanca.” The festival continues through Nov. 12 with “The Pirate Captain Toledano,” a short film set in the world of Jewish piracy in the Caribbean; “Why Do They Hate Us?” a documentary examining anti-Semitism in France; and “Dimona Twist,” a nostalgic work about Casablanca. Through Nov. 12. $325 for opening gala, $15 for individual films. Opening gala at 4 p.m. at Paramount Studios, 5555 Melrose Ave., Los Angeles. Films run Nov. 7-12 at Laemmle Music Hall, 9036 Wilshire Blvd., Beverly Hills. (323) 272-4574. sephardiceducationalcenter.org.

MITZVAH DAY

Paint a homeless shelter, sort through clothing donations, prepare low-income students for admission interviews at college preparatory schools or participate in other volunteer activities on this Mitzvah Day, when The Jewish Federation of Greater Los Angeles and San Fernando Valley synagogues hold community service projects to help people in need. Among the synagogues involved are Stephen Wise Temple, Shomrei Torah Synagogue, Temple Aliyah and Temple Judea. For times, locations and more information on Federation projects, call (323) 761-8000 or visit jewishla.org/program/community-service-days. Contact synagogues for information on their programs or visit their websites at wisela.org/mitzvahday, templealiyah.org, stsonline.org and templejudea.com/mitzvahday.

HADASSAH WOMEN’S WELLNESS DAY

Hadassah Southern California’s daylong gathering aims to educate and empower women to live full and healthy lives. World-class medical experts from the Cedars-Sinai and UCLA medical centers will explore topics including secrets of female urology and sexual health, memory training and brain fitness, heart and lifestyle, body blind spots, the differences between men and women, and women’s cancers and melanoma. Ellen Hershkin, Hadassah’s national president, is scheduled to appear. Wendy Walsh, a relationship expert, is set to moderate a panel discussion. 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. $95 (includes continental breakfast, lunch and parking). American Jewish University, 15600 Mulholland Drive, Los Angeles. (310) 276-0036. hadassah.org/events/wellnessday2017.

“AMERICAN CULTURE AND THE JEWISH EXPERIENCE IN MUSIC”

The impact of American Jews on music in the United States will be examined during this three-day event. “David’s Quilt,” an evening concert exploring the life of the biblical King David, starts the event Nov. 5. A two-day conference Nov. 6–7 will follow. Panels will focus on the Jewish-American musical experience, from the great immigrant wave of the 1880s to the 1920s, through Yiddish folk, popular music, Broadway and klezmer wedding music. Topics include “Jews and the L.A. Music Industry,” “Jewish Musical Interactions With Popular Media” and “Echoes of the Holocaust on the American Musical Stage: ‘Fiddler on the Roof’ and Beyond.” A chamber music concert will conclude the event. All music will be performed by UCLA students. “David’s Quilt,” 7 p.m. Free. Stephen Wise Temple, 15500 Stephen S. Wise Drive, Los Angeles. The conference will be held from 9 a.m. Monday through Tuesday evening. Free. UCLA Luskin Conference Center, 425 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles. (310) 825-5387. cjs.ucla.edu.

“JEWISH PHOTOGRAPHERS OF MODERNITY”

Deborah Dash Moore, the Frederick G.L. Huetwell professor of history and director of the Jean and Samuel Frankel Center for Judaic Studies at the University of Michigan, will deliver the 2017 Jerome Nemer Lecture hosted by USC’s Casden Institute and USC’s Visual Studies Research Institute. Moore has published an acclaimed trilogy examining American Jewry in the years from 1920 to 1960, including the experience of Jewish soldiers in World War II. In her 2014 book, “Urban Origins of American Judaism,” she examines synagogues, city streets and photographs to understand how city life has shaped religious practices in Judaism. Los Angeles photographer Bill Aron, a chronicler of Jewish communities around the world, also will speak. 4:45-7 p.m. (4:45 p.m. reception, 5:30 p.m. dinner). Free (reservations required). Town and Gown, University Park Campus, USC, 665 Exposition Blvd., Los Angeles. (213) 740-1744. usc.edu/esvp. RSVP code: NemerLecture.

SHARSHERET ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION

Israeli singer and songwriter Eleanor Tallie performs in celebration of the first anniversary of Sharsheret California, which supports young Jewish women and their families facing breast cancer. Tallie, who sings in English, has a bluesy, soulful sound that incorporates hip-hop and horns in ways some have described as “neo-soul.” The event will honor and thank the volunteers and friends who have helped make Sharsheret’s first year of operation on the West Coast a success. The evening also includes a VIP meet-and-greet and a wine and hors d’oeuvres reception. 7-9 p.m. $72 for young leadership (30 and under), $90 (per person over 30). Robertson Art Space, 1020 S. Robertson Blvd., Los Angeles. (866) 474-2774. sharsheret.org/cacelebration.

MON NOV 6
“AMERICAN LEADERSHIP IN THE MIDDLE EAST”

McGill University professor and presidential historian Gil Troy, a prominent activist in the fight against the delegitimization of Israel, and Valley Beth Shalom Rabbi Ed Feinstein, an active American Israel public affairs committee member, discuss the past and future of American leadership in the Middle East. 7 p.m. registration; 7:30 p.m. program. Free. Valley Beth Shalom, 15739 Ventura Blvd., Encino. (818) 788-6000. vbs.org.

TUE NOV 7
ISRAEL’S MEDICAL CLOWNS

Two medical clowns from Israel, David “Dudi” Barashi and Rotem Goldenberg, will discuss how clowns can heal illness and help build bridges between Arabs and Israelis. Medical clowns in Israel use laughter to comfort patients. Also, film director Sasha Kapustina will talk about her documentary about Israel’s medical clowns, “I Clown You.” 6:30 p.m. Free dinner for members of Sinai Temple and its men’s club; $10 dinner for nonmembers. Sinai Temple,10400 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 474-1518. sinaitemple.org.

WED NOV 8
LONG BEACH JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL

Five films are on the schedule Nov. 8, 9, 11 and 12 at the Long Beach Jewish Film Festival. “On the Map” tells the Cinderella story of the Maccabi Tel Aviv basketball team’s unlikely run in the 1977 European Cup championship. In “The Invisibles,” four young Jews must survive in 1943 Berlin. In “Moos,” a Dutch film co-written and directed by Job Gosschalk, the life of a young woman who cares for her father is upended by the arrival of an old friend. “Harold and Lillian: A Hollywood Love Story” examines the lives of Harold and Lillian Michelson, who left an indelible mark on classic Hollywood films. In “The Women’s Balcony,” a tragedy at a bar mitzvah divides an Orthodox community in Jerusalem. $50 festival pass; $12 per film; $5 for students. Alpert Jewish Community Center, Weinberg Jewish Federation Campus, 3801 E. Willow St., Long Beach. (562) 426-7601. alpertjcc.org.

“ISRAEL AT THE CROSSROADS: WHY THE JEWISH STATE STILL MATTERS”

Larry Greenfield, a fellow of the Claremont Institute for the Study of Statesmanship and Political Philosophy and an expert on Israeli affairs, and Jewish Journal Senior Writer Danielle Berrin discuss Israel’s policies and security concerns, and its connections to the United States and American Jewry, religion and the world. Moderated by Rick Entin, who co-chairs the Israel Matters Committee at Kehillat Israel. 7 p.m. Free. RSVPs are recommended but not required. Kehillat Israel, 16019 W. Sunset Blvd., Pacific Palisades. (310) 459-2328. ourki.shulcloud.com/form/im.

AVI AVITAL

Israeli mandolin virtuoso and composer Avi Avital leads clarinetist and composer Kinan Azmeh and New York City chamber orchestra The Knights in performing original, baroque and romantic masterworks grounded in the classical tradition and crossing boundaries into the worlds of Middle Eastern and Balkan music, klezmer and jazz. Avital is known for making new arrangements of classical works not originally intended for mandolin. 7:30 p.m. $50-$90. The Broad Stage, 1310 11th St., Santa Monica. (310) 434-3200. thebroadstage.org/azmehavitalknights.

MEET “THE INQUISITOR’S TALE” AUTHOR

New York Times best-selling author Adam Gidwitz, a Newbery Honor Books Award winner and a National Jewish Book Award finalist, will sign “The Inquisitor’s Tale: Or, the Three Magical Children and Their Holy Dog.” The book is about three children who traverse villages in France in the year 1242 in an attempt to prevent Talmuds and other holy books from being destroyed. 7:30 p.m. $10; $5 for educators and students with ID. Burton Sperber Jewish Community Library at American Jewish University, 15600 Mulholland Drive, Los Angeles. (310) 440-1572. wcce.aju.edu.

THU NOV 9
“IRAN’S QUEST FOR REGIONAL HEGEMONY”

As debate continues over the Iranian nuclear agreement, Tel Aviv University professor emeritus and UCLA Younes and Soraya Nazarian Center for Israel Studies visiting professor David Menashri will explore the impact of Iran’s growing power and ambition on the Middle East and beyond, placing these developments in their historical and regional context. 6 p.m. Free. UCLA Royce Hall, Room 314, 340 Royce Drive, Los Angeles. (310) 825-9646. international.ucla.edu/israel/event/12782.

MEET “HANK & JIM” AUTHOR

Author Scott Eyman will discuss his latest book, “Hank & Jim: The Fifty-Year Friendship of Henry Fonda and James Stewart,” a fascinating portrait of the actors’ extraordinary friendship. Eyman is the author of 15 books, three of them New York Times best-sellers. 7:30 p.m. $10. Burton Sperber Jewish Community Library at American Jewish University, 15600 Mulholland Drive, Los Angeles. (310) 440-1572. wcce.aju.edu.

What’s Happening in Jewish L.A. Oct. 27-Nov. 2

Oct. 30: ISRAEL PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA

FRI OCT 27
“AIDA’S SECRETS”

This documentary tells the story of two brothers, now in their 70s, who remained unknown to each other for decades. They were separated as toddlers at the Bergen-Belsen displaced persons camp after World War II. The nephews of one brother reunite the two and film their story as the long-lost siblings also reconnect with their mother, who continues to harbor secrets about their origins. Laemmle Royal, 11523 Santa Monica Blvd., West Los Angeles, (310) 478-3836; Laemmle Playhouse, 673 E. Colorado Blvd., Pasadena, (626) 844-6500; Laemmle Town Center, 17200 Ventura Blvd., Encino, (818) 981-9811. laemmle.com.

LOS ANGELES COMIC CON

Break out your capes and lightsabers! Join superheroes, aliens, zombies and others as science fiction and fantasy fans converge for the sixth annual Stan Lee’s Los Angeles Comic Con. Fans will have the chance to meet Lee, Marvel Comics’ former editor-in-chief, who co-created Spider-Man, the Hulk, Doctor Strange, Iron Man, Thor, the X-Men and more. Also scheduled to appear are Paul Reubens (aka Pee-wee Herman) of “Gotham”; Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson of “San Andreas” and “Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle”; Chloe Bennett of “Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.”; Scott Bakula of “Quantum Leap” and “Star Trek: Enterprise”; Katee Sackhoff of “Battlestar Galactica”; and Melissa Joan Hart of “Sabrina the Teenage Witch,” among others. Through Oct. 29. Tickets start at $30. 1 p.m. Los Angeles Convention Center, 1201 S. Figueroa St., Los Angeles. (213) 741-1151. stanleeslacomiccon.com.

GAD ELMALEH

Moroccan-Jewish stand-up comedian Gad Elmaleh performs at the Hollywood Improv. Elmaleh started his career performing in small shows for the Montreal Sephardic community. He rose to prominence in France after relocating to Paris in the 1990s, thanks to an observational comedic sensibility similar to that of Jerry Seinfeld. Another show is scheduled for Oct. 28. Both are sold out. 8 p.m. Wait-list only (must put name down in person when doors open for the first show). Open only to those 18 and older. Hollywood Improv, 8162 Melrose Ave., Los Angeles. (323) 651-2583. hollywood.improv.com.

JEWISH TALES OF THE SUPERNATURAL SHABBAT SERVICE

Temple Kol Tikvah Rabbi Jon Hanish and Cantor Noa Shaashua lead a service that explores how, throughout history, Jewish texts spoke of the supernatural with stories that reflected the fears of Jews living in the Diaspora. From dybbuks to golems to ghosts, Judaism has had a tale or two to tell that would make your spine tingle. Socializing, coffee and sweet treats follow the service. 6:30 p.m. Free. Temple Kol Tikvah, 20400 Ventura Blvd., Woodland Hills. (818) 348-0670. koltikvah.org.

SUN OCT 29
“ENEMIES, A LOVE STORY: A NEW WAY FORWARD FOR JEWISH MUSLIM-RELATIONS

Yossi Klein Halevy and Imam Abdullah Antepli, co-directors of the Shalom Hartman Institute Muslim Leadership Initiative, discuss Muslim-Jewish relations. Moderated by David Suissa, publisher and editor-in-chief of the Jewish Journal. Free. 7 p.m. Beth Jacob Congregation, 9030 W. Olympic Blvd., Beverly Hills. hartman.org.il.

TOUR DE SUMMER CAMPS

Bike or hike to raise money to send children in Los Angeles to Jewish summer camps. The event will have courses of different lengths for a variety of fitness levels: 100-, 62-, 36- or 18-mile routes for cyclists (helmets required); 9-, 6-, 3- and 1-mile routes for hikers. Staggered starting times begin at 7 a.m. (subject to weather conditions). Sponsored by the Rosalinde and Arthur Gilbert Foundation. All participants 30 years and older must raise $500; participants 16-29 years old, $250; and hikers 7-15 years old, $180. Routes start and end at Camp Alonim on the Brandeis-Bardin Campus of American Jewish University, 1101 Pepper Tree Lane, Simi Valley. (323) 761 8013. tourdesummercamps.org.

MIDDLE EAST SECURITY FORUM

Leading foreign affairs experts and former government officials discuss an array of issues including Iran’s nuclear program; ISIS and the Syrian civil war; the prospects for a sustainable two-state solution; Israel’s relations with the Arab world, and more. Featuring Nimrod Novik, fellow at the Israel Policy Forum and former adviser to the late Shimon Peres; Shira Efron, associate policy researcher at the Rand Corp.; Howard Berman, former chairman of the House Committee on Foreign Affairs; and others. 10 a.m. $40; $18 for students with valid ID. Sinai Temple, 10400 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (212) 315-1741. ipforum.org.

“DEFENDING ARTISTIC EXPRESSION”

High-profile artists from music, television and film come together to discuss issues surrounding the cultural boycott campaign against Israel. Participants include Alan Parsons, a musician, producer and former Pink Floyd engineer; actor Mark Pellegrino; entertainment attorney Ken Hertz; writer-director-producer David Zucker; and Israel musician Guy Erez. Moderated by Lana Melman, the CEO of Liberate Art, who is an expert and commentator on the cultural boycott effort against Israel. 4-7 p.m. Free. Wilshire Boulevard Temple Irmas Campus, 11661 W. Olympic Blvd., Los Angeles. (213) 388-2401. wbtla.org/defending-artistic-expression.

GAIL SIMMONS

Author and “Top Chef” judge Gail Simmons talks about her new book, “Bringing It Home: Favorite Recipes From a Life of Adventurous Eating.” Joining her is Curtis Stone, chef-owner of Maude & Gwen, and Los Angeles Times writer Patt Morrison. 6:30 p.m. Tickets start at $15. Aratani Theatre, Japanese American Cultural & Community Center, 244 S. San Pedro St., Los Angeles. (213) 628-2725. latimes.com/ideasexchange.

“TOGETHER AS ONE”

This interfaith concert to raise funds to aid people experiencing homelessness features the renowned ethnic music and dance group Yuval Ron Ensemble. Attendees of this program of unity and peace are asked to bring adult socks or underwear (new); canned or dried goods; or a grocery, Subway restaurant or El Pollo Loco restaurant gift card. All gifts will be donated to St. Joseph Center and Safe Place for Youth, which serves the homeless youth of Venice Beach. Co-sponsored by University Synagogue, the Aga Khan Council for the Western United States, Ward AME Church, Safe Place for Youth and St. Joseph Center. 4-6 p.m. Free (gift for the homeless required). University Synagogue, 11960 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 472-1255. unisyn.org.

SOPRANO WILLA WEBBER

Berlin-based and internationally acclaimed soprano Willa Webber debuts songs from her new “Willa World Wide” EP and performs music from the upcoming “Irena” opera. Composed by Megan Cavallari, “Irena” tells the story of the Polish nurse Irena Sandler, who risked her life in saving more than 2,500 Jewish children from the Warsaw ghetto during the Holocaust. Cantor Chayim Frenkel of Reconstructionist synagogue Kehillat Israel also is scheduled to appear. Two-time Emmy Award-winning composer Martin Davich accompanies Webber on piano. Co-presented by the Consulate General of the Federal Republic of Germany in Los Angeles and Kehillat Israel. 5 p.m. Free. Kehillat Israel Synagogue, 16019 W. Sunset Blvd., Pacific Palisades. (310) 459-2328. ourki.org.

MON OCT 30
ISRAEL PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA

Maestro Zubin Mehta conducts the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra in this stop on its seven-city North American tour. The concert includes the tour debut of Beethoven’s “Piano Concerto No. 3” in C minor, Op. 37, featuring pianist Yefim Bronfman. Amit Poznansky’s “Footnote” suite from the score of the film “Footnote” and Franz Schubert’s “Symphony No. 9 in C major” (“The Great”) round out the evening, which likely will be the last time local audiences see Mehta before he retires as the orchestra’s music director in 2019. 8 p.m. $54-$162. Walt Disney Concert Hall, 111 S. Grand Ave., Los Angeles. (310) 850-2000. laphil.com.

HOODIE ALLEN

Catch rapper Hoodie Allen (born Steven Adam Markowitz) as his tour swings through Southern California. The artist, from Long Island, N.Y., released his
new album, “The Hype,” in September. 7:30 p.m. doors open; 8:30 p.m. concert. $33. The Fonda Theatre, 6126 Hollywood Blvd., Los Angeles. (323) 464-6269. fondatheatre.com.

TUE OCT 31
GUY GERBER

Bring your glow sticks,  comfortable shoes and Israel pride for a Halloween party featuring Israeli electronic music artist and underground DJ  Guy Gerber, who creates downbeat, chill and ambient sounds that have wowed crowds from Ibiza to New
York. Gerber is known for his endurance, such as his 12-hour gig at the 2014 Burning Man festival. 10 p.m. to 3 a.m. $30-$50. Sound Nightclub, 1642 Las Palmas Ave., Los Angeles. (323) 962-9000. soundnightclub.com.

THUR NOV 2
JESSIE WARE

British singer-songwriter Jessie Ware plays songs from her third album, “Glasshouse.” Ware has come a long way since working as a journalist at the Jewish Chronicle, where she harbored dreams of being a musician. Her 2012 breakout album, “Devotion,” a blend of sultry pop, soul and R&B, won over critics. Her new album was released on Oct. 20. 8 p.m., all-ages show. $25. The Troubadour, 9801 Santa Monica Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 858-8443. troubadour.com.

Every Year Coming to Yizkor by Rabbi Janet Madden

Memorial candles

Every year now, in the midst of apples and honey and family recipes and the sweet new beginnings of Rosh HaShanah, I am already looking ahead to Yom Kippur, thinking of the first Yizkor book in which my mother’s name was included and the first Yizkor service in which I, too, was among those mourning a parent. Every Rosh HaShanah reminds me, again, of how every year since that first year, the High Holy Days have been connected to her yahrzeit and private, personal mourning and memories and to the first Yizkor service of the new year. Every High Holy Days brings me the opportunity to remember and mourn publicly, with those newly-bereaved, as I was that year, and with those who have learned, as I have, that there is a beautiful balance between sadness and comfort when we acknowledge our griefs in community.

Of course, I knew long before my mother’s death that the ten days of the Yamin Noramim—the Days of Awe—are filled with reminders of the brevity and uncertainty of life. The liturgies of Rosh HaShanah and Yom Kippur reiterate the reality of our mortality. The Unatana tokef prayer, especially, uses graphic images to remind us of our reality: that even as we wish one another to be inscribed and sealed for a good year, we really have no idea what sorrows and joys await us. But the year that she was diagnosed and we were told that she would not survive more than a few months—and in fact died within weeks—was the first Rosh HaShanah that I had just buried a loved one, and, I think, the first time I understood the Unatana tokef.

Every year since that year, the High Holy Days make me more aware, again, of mortality. Of course, they are supposed to. The High Holy Days are intended to be awesome; they are infused with a sense of urgency that encourages us to not engage in denial, to not postpone, to not avoid difficult conversations and decisions. In heightening our awareness that life ends and that there is never enough time, the process of engaging in teshuvah—of turning, returning and being turned—is intended to disrupt us, to wake us up and shake us out of complacency. The High Holy Days push us to reflect on life’s big questions: who we are, what our purpose is, what our lives mean, how we want to be remembered.

For me, the season of the High Holy Days is also the time that I turn over garden soil, harvest the last of summer crops, plant winter vegetables, and rake up feathers from my molting chickens. I think of this as a naturally pensive time, the turning of the seasons reminding me that I’ve lived through another year and that so many have not. The timing of the High Holy Days means that the natural world itself reinforces the theme of turning and returning: summer has ended, the daylight is changing, leaves are turning colors and falling from trees, the Autumnal Equinox—which this year, in the Northern Hemisphere, took place on the second day of Rosh HaShanah—momentarily balances day and night as exact equals. I like to think of the Yom Kippur Yizkor, the first Yizkor of the year, as the liturgical equivalent of the Autumnal Equinox: the opportunity to balance sorrow with consolation, the past with the present, regret with hope, private remembrances with public commemoration. Perhaps that is the reason why even those who otherwise eschew synagogue attendance show up for Yizkor—because grieving alone is painful and grieving together to reminds us that so long as there is a Jewish community we are not alone.

Rabbi Janet Madden PhD was ordained by The Academy for Jewish Religion-California. She serves as the rabbi of Temple Havurat Emet and Providence Saint John’s Health Center and has been a student of the Gamliel Institute.

Rabbi Janet Madden

Rabbi Janet Madden

 

[Ed. Note: We at Kavod v’Nichum and the Gamliel Institute hope that your holiday season – for those who celebrate – was meaningful and uplifting, and that you have been inscribed and sealed for a good, sweet year full of blessings. To those who engage in the work of the Chevrah Kadisha in the broadest sense be granted additional blessings for their participation in this holy endeavor and sacred labor. — JB]

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GAMLIEL INSTITUTE COURSES

LOOKING FORWARD: UPCOMING COURSE

The Gamliel Institute will be offering course 5, Chevrah Kadisha: Ritual, Liturgy, & Practice (Other than Taharah & Shmirah), online, afternoons/evenings, in the Winter semester, starting roughly in January, 2018. This is the core course focusing on ritual, liturgy, practical matters, how-to, and what it means (for everything other than Taharah and Shmirah, which are covered in course 2).

CLASS SESSIONS

The course will meet online for twelve Tuesdays (the day will be adjusted in any weeks with Jewish holidays during this course).

Information on attending the course preview, the online orientation, and the course will be announced and sent to those registered. Register or contact us for more information.

REGISTRATION

You can register for any Gamliel Institute course online at jewish-funerals.org/gamreg. A full description of all of the courses is found there.

For more information, visit the Gamliel Institute website, or at the Kavod v’Nichum website. Please contact us for information or assistance by email info@jewish-funerals.org, or phone at 410-733-3700.

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DONATIONS

Donations are always needed and most welcome to support the work of Kavod v’Nichum and the Gamliel Institute, helping us to bring you the conference, offer community trainings, provide scholarships to students, refurbish and update course materials, expand our teaching, support programs such as Taste of Gamliel, the Gamliel Café, and the Gamliel Gracuates courses, provide and add to online resources, encourage and support communities in establishing, training, and improving their Chevrah Kadisha, and assist with many other programs and activities.

You can donate online at http://jewish-funerals.org/gamliel-institute-financial-support or by snail mail to: either Kavod v’Nichum, or to The Gamliel Institute, both c/o David Zinner, Executive Director, Kavod v’Nichum, 8112 Sea Water Path, Columbia, MD  21045. Kavod v’Nichum [and the Gamliel Institute] is a recognized and registered 501(c)(3) organization, and donations may be tax-deductible to the full extent provided by law. Call 410-733-3700 if you have any questions or want to know more about supporting Kavod v’Nichum or the Gamliel Institute.

You can also become a member (Individual or Group) of Kavod v’Nichum to help support our work. Click here (http://www.jewish-funerals.org/money/).

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MORE INFORMATION

If you would like to receive the periodic Kavod v’Nichum Newsletter by email, or be added to the Kavod v’Nichum Chevrah Kadisha & Jewish Cemetery email discussion list, please be in touch and let us know at info@jewish-funerals.org.

You can also be sent a regular email link to the Expired And Inspired blog by sending a message requesting to be added to the distribution list to j.blair@jewish-funerals.org.

Be sure to check out the Kavod V’Nichum website at www.jewish-funerals.org, and for information on the Gamliel Institute, courses planned, and student work in this field also visit the Gamliel.Institute website.

RECEIVE NOTICES WHEN THIS BLOG IS UPDATED!

Sign up on our Facebook Group page: just search for and LIKE Chevra Kadisha sponsored by Kavod vNichum, or follow our Twitter feed @chevra_kadisha.

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SUBMISSIONS ALWAYS WELCOME

If you have an idea for an entry you would like to submit to this blog, please be in touch. Email J.blair@jewish-funerals.org. We are always interested in original unpublished materials that would be of interest to our readers, relating to the broad topics surrounding the continuum of Jewish preparation, planning, rituals, rites, customs, practices, activities, and celebrations approaching the end of life, at the time of death, during the funeral, in the grief and mourning process, and in comforting those dying and those mourning, as well as the actions and work of those who address those needs, including those serving in Bikkur Cholim, Caring Committees, the Chevrah Kadisha, as Shomrim, funeral providers, in funeral homes and mortuaries, and operators and maintainers of cemeteries.

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Calendar: September 25 – October 5

Sasha Abramsky

TUES. | OCT 3

REACHING ACROSS THE DIVIDE

How can our differences make us stronger? Hear what Reform Rabbi Joel Nickerson of Temple Isaiah, Orthodox Rabbi Jason Weiner of Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and the program’s moderator, Conservative Rabbi David Wolpe of Sinai Temple, have to say as they discuss how Jews can use the differences in their practices and beliefs to strengthen the American Jewish community. 6:30 p.m. Free. Sinai Temple, 10400 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 481-3340. sinaitemple.org/events.

SINAI TEMPLE TEEN CENTER’S PARENT INFO NIGHT

The Sinai Temple Teen Center is a community of Jewish teenagers who get together for activities such as weekend retreats, leadership training days and religious experiences. Parents can learn what its multitude of events and programming has to offer Jewish teens. 7 p.m.  Free. Sinai Temple, 10400 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 474-1518. sinaitemple.org.    

IAC REAL ESTATE NETWORK

Four real estate experts will discuss what the Los Angeles market will look like in 10 years at the Israeli American Council Real Estate Network event “Forward Snapshot of LA.” Panelists include Dan Rosenfeld, developer and president of Acanthus LLC; Rick Cole, Santa Monica city manger; Manjeet Ranu, senior executive officer of the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority; and moderator Gail Goldberg, executive director of the Urban Land Institute. The event also will include a special opening presentation by Joslyn Treece from the LA 2028 Olympic committee. The event includes food, networking and an open bar. 7 p.m.; 8 p.m. program. $50. IAC Shepher Community Center, 6530 Winnetka Ave., Woodland Hills. israeliamerican.org/laforward.

THURS. | OCT. 5

“ABOVE THE DROWNING SEA”

Longtime “Law & Order” showrunner and head writer René Balcer channels his talents toward a different kind of drama: “Above the Drowning Sea,” a feature-length documentary about the escape of European Jews to Shanghai as World War II loomed. Panel conversation follows screening. 6 p.m. Free. USC’s Wallis Annenberg Hall Auditorium, 3630 Watt Way, Los Angeles. abovethedrowningsea.com

SASHA ABRAMSKY

Sasha Abramsky will discuss and sign “Jumping at Shadows: The Triumph of Fear and the End of the American Dream.” In his book, Abramsky digs into what he says is America’s most dangerous epidemic: irrational fear. He takes readers on a dramatic journey through a divided nation, delivering an eye-opening analysis of our misconceptions about risk and threats. Abramsky shows that how we calculate risk and deal with fear can teach us a great deal about ourselves and can expose our culture’s deeply rooted racism, classism and xenophobia. 7 p.m. Free. Book Soup, 8818 Sunset Blvd., West Hollywood. (310) 659-3110. booksoup.com.

Arts & Entertainment calendar: Fall 2017

Sunday, Oct. 5: "Cagney: The Musical"

FRI | SEPT 15

Amy Dresner, “My Fair Junkie”

AMY DRESNER, “MY FAIR JUNKIE”

Author Amy Dresner discusses and signs her book, “My Fair Junkie: A Memoir of Getting Dirty and Staying Clean.” Growing up in Beverly Hills, Dresner had it all: She was enrolled in a top-notch private school, sent to the most expensive summer camps, and even given a weekly clothing allowance. However, it soon became evident that if she could snort it, smoke it or have sex with it, she would. Smart and charming, with her father’s money to fall back on, she managed to get by, keeping it somewhat together. But on Christmas Eve 2011, it all changed. High on OxyContin, she pulled a bread knife on her husband and was arrested for felony domestic violence with a deadly weapon. She ultimately found herself penniless, divorced and having to perform 240 hours of court-ordered community service. Find out what happened as she struggled with sobriety, sex addiction and starting over in her 40s. 7 p.m. Free. Book Soup, 8818 Sunset Blvd., West Hollywood. (310) 659-3110. booksoup.com.

TUES | SEPT 19

JERRY RUBIN, AMERICAN REVOLUTIONARY

Hear writer Pat Thomas talk about his book, “Did It! From Yippie to Yuppie: Jerry Rubin, an American Revolutionary,” with Rubin’s former wife, Mimi Leonard. The book is an oral and visual history of the infamous and ubiquitous Rubin, the first biography of the Yippies co-founder, anti-Vietnam War radical, Chicago 8 defendant, New Age/self-help proponent and social-networking pioneer. Based on more than 75 interviews with his co-conspirators, friends and foes, the book explores the life and times of Rubin as well as the idealistic firebrands of the 1960s, the “me” generation in the ’70s and the capitalists of the ’80s. The book also explores Rubin’s often misunderstood relationship with his fellow radical Abbie Hoffman. 7 p.m. Free. Book Soup, 8818 Sunset Blvd., West Hollywood. (310) 659-3110. booksoup.com

THURS | OCT 5

“CAGNEY: THE MUSICAL”

James Cagney was a fluent Yiddish speaker who became known as Hollywood’s “tough guy in tap shoes.” “Cagney: The Musical” follows the life of the legendary performer from the streets of New York to vaudeville song-and-dance man to one of the brightest stars of Hollywood. A cast of six (the original crew from the off-Broadway production), led by Robert Creighton in the title role, will tap-dance its way through favorites such as: “Give My Regards to Broadway,” “You’re a Grand Old Flag” and “Yankee Doodle Dandy.” The production features a book by Peter Colley, and music and lyrics by Creighton and Christopher McGovern. Through Oct. 29. Tickets start at $25. El Portal Theatre, 5269 Lankershim Blvd., North Hollywood. (866) 811-4111. cagneythemusical.com.

FRI | OCT 6-TUES | OCT 10

JEWISH CAMP FOR ADULTS

Looking for fun, adventure and a sense of community? This three-night, all-inclusive camp-style getaway in Simi Valley for adults in their 20s and 30s could be just the trip for you. It includes an open bar, out-of-the-box camp activities, optional Jewish experiences and kosher-style meals. You do not need to be religious or even Jewish to attend. 7 p.m. Cabins starting at $550. Camp Alonim, 1101 Peppertree Lane, Simi Valley. (202) 536-2929. trybalgatherings.com.

FRI | OCT 6

ELIZABETH ROSNER, “SURVIVOR CAFÉ”

As survivors of many of the 20th century’s most monumental events — the Holocaust, Pearl Harbor, the Killing Fields — die, Elizabeth Rosner’s “Survivor Café: The Legacy of Trauma and the Labyrinth of Memory” addresses urgent questions: How do we carry those stories forward? How do we collectively ensure that the horrors of the past are not forgotten? Rosner organizes her book around three trips she took with her father to Buchenwald concentration camp — in 1983, 1995 and 2015 — each journey an experience in which personal history confronts commemoration and memorialization. She explores the echoes of similar legacies among descendants of African-American slaves, descendants of Cambodian survivors of the Killing Fields, descendants of survivors of the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and the effects of 9/11 on the general population. Examining current brain research, Rosner depicts the efforts to understand the intergenerational inheritance of trauma, as well as the intricacies of remembrance in the aftermath of atrocity. Rosner will discuss and sign her book. 7 p.m. Free. Book Soup, 8818 Sunset Blvd., West Hollywood. (310) 659-3110. booksoup.com

THURS | OCT 12

“KAREN FINLEY: THE EXPANDED UNICORN GRATITUDE MYSTERY”

Karen Finley confronts the absurdity of contemporary politics and society in this new work. Her solo performance confronts issues of citizenship, abuse of power and gender disparity, while poeticizing magical beings, aggressive thankfulness, collective intimacy and international trauma. 8:30 p.m. $20; discounts available. Roy and Edna Disney/CalArts Theater, 631 W. Second St., Los Angeles. redcat.org/event/karen-finley.

SAT | OCT 28

Melissa Rivers: “Joan Rivers Confidential”

MELISSA RIVERS: “JOAN RIVERS CONFIDENTIAL”

Melissa Rivers discusses and signs her book about her famous mother, “Joan Rivers Confidential: The Unseen Scrapbooks, Joke Cards, Personal Files and Photos of a Very Funny Woman Who Kept Everything.” With a career that began in the late 1950s, Joan Rivers’ popular humor appealed to generations of fans. “Joan Rivers Confidential” is a compilation of never-before-seen personal archives. Assembled by her daughter and Scott Currie, the book contains scripts and monologues, letters from famous friends, exchanges with fans and rare photographs, as well as classic and never-before-heard jokes. 2 p.m. Free. Book Soup, 8818 Sunset Blvd., West Hollywood. (310) 659-3110. booksoup.com.

MON | OCT 30

Israel Philharmonic Orchestra

ISRAEL PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA

This special tour celebrates legendary conductor Zubin Mehta, who recently announced his retirement as the orchestra’s music director. The Los Angeles performance will mark the tour debut of Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 3 in C minor, Op. 37, featuring pianist Yefim Bronfman. Amit Poznansky’s “Footnote Suite” and the tour debut of Franz Schubert’s Symphony No. 9 in C major (“The Great”) will round out the evening’s music. Proceeds benefit the Keynote Music Education Program. Cocktail attire. Tickets start at $350. 6 p.m. supper; 8 p.m. concert. Walt Disney Concert Hall, 111 S. Grand Ave., Los Angeles. (310) 277-0100. afipo.org.

TUES | NOV 7

“CHASING MEM’RIES: A DIFFERENT KIND OF MUSICAL”

In this world premiere with songs written by legendary lyricists Alan and Marilyn Bergman, Tyne Daly stars as a woman not quite ready to let go of the life she’s loved and the love of her life. 8 p.m. Through Dec. 10. Tickets start at $25. Geffen Playhouse, 10886 Le Conte Ave., Los Angeles. (310) 208-5454. geffenplayhouse.com.

Events in Los Angeles: Week of Sept. 14

"Hot mess kitchen"

FRI | SEPT 15

AMY DRESNER

Amy Dresner discusses and signs “My Fair Junkie: A Memoir of Getting Dirty and Staying Clean.” Growing up in Beverly Hills, Dresner had it all. She attended a top-notch private school and the most expensive summer camps, and she even had a weekly clothing allowance. However, if there was anything she could snort, smoke or have sex with, she would. She ultimately found herself penniless, divorced and with 240 hours of court-ordered community service. Get her story about struggling with sobriety, sex addiction and starting over in her 40s. 7 p.m. Free. Book Soup, 8818 Sunset Blvd., West Hollywood. (310) 659-3110. booksoup.com.

INTERFAITH COUPLES’ SHABBAT DINNER

Gather with other interfaith couples to share stories, get support and share best practices about navigating two backgrounds in one relationship — and, of course, eat! 7:30 p.m. $36. Address in Culver City given upon RSVP. (213) 973-4072. interfaithfamily.com/losangeles

SAT | SEPT 16

RABBI DAVID GOLINKIN

Join Rabbi David Golinkin, Kehillat Ma’arav scholar in residence for the day, for “Shabbat in 3-D” in the morning, and Selichot observance in the evening. The Shabbat service will explore the topic: “What to Do About the State of Judaism in the Jewish State.” The theme of the Selichot observance is: “Asking Forgiveness and the Confession of Sins in the Talmud.” 9:30 a.m. Shabbat; 8 p.m. Selichot. Free. Kehillat Ma’arav, 1715 21st St., Santa Monica. (310) 829-0566. km-synagogue.org.

“COMING TO THE AID OF THE PERSECUTED: SAVING THE YAZIDIS FROM PERSECUTION”

The Yazidi people of Northern Iraq are facing slavery and genocide at the hands of ISIS. The Jewish Journal, in partnership with the Beyond Genocide Campaign, presents a panel to discuss the genocide of the Yazidis and what it means for their future. The panel features Rabbi Pam Frydman, coordinator at the Beyond Genocide Campaign; Yotam Polizer, co-CEO at IsraAID; Haider Elias, president of Yazda; Eitan Arom, Journal staff writer; and Rabbi Mel Gottlieb, president of the Academy for Jewish Religion, California (AJRCA). 5 p.m. Free. Congregation B’nai David Judea, 8906 Pico Blvd., Los Angeles. Also 9:30 a.m. Sept. 17 at University Synagogue, 11960 W. Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles; and noon, Sept. 18, at AJRCA, 574 Hilgard Ave., Los Angeles. (213) 368-1661. norcalrabbis.org/yezidis.

SUN | SEPT 17

“HOT MESS KITCHEN”

Authors Gabi Moskowitz and Miranda Berman want millennials to avoid the perils of takeout and take back the kitchen. They discuss their new cookbook, “Hot Mess Kitchen: Recipes for Your Delicious Disastrous Life,” 3 p.m. Free. Book Soup, 8818 Sunset Blvd., West Hollywood. (310) 659-3110. booksoup.com.

YALA’S RUNNING CLUSTER

Join Young Adults of Los Angeles’ Running Cluster for a four-mile, wooded loop from the Doheny Fountain to the newly restored Electric Fountain at Beverly Gardens Park. After the run, enjoy smoothies and pressed juice at Alchemy Health Foods, 638 N. Robertson Blvd., West Hollywood. 9:30 a.m. Free. Doheny Fountain, North Oakhurst Drive and North Doheny Drive, Beverly Hills. yala.org.

BIRTHRIGHT ISRAEL REUNION EVENT

All Birthright alumni and Israel Defense Forces members are invited to this social Birthright Israel, Israel Free Spirit Reunion event for past NCSY Connect and Aish trips. 8 p.m. Free. Morry’s Fireplace, 9118 Pico Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 229-9000.

TUES | SEPT 19

WRITER PAT THOMAS

Writer Pat Thomas talks about his book “Did It! From Yippie to Yuppie: Jerry Rubin, an American Revolutionary,” with Rubin’s former wife, Mimi Leonard. The book is an oversized oral and visual history of the infamous and ubiquitous Yippies co-founder, anti-Vietnam War radical, Chicago Eight defendant, New Age/self-help proponent and social-networking pioneer. 7 p.m. Free. Book Soup, 8818 Sunset Blvd., West Hollywood. (310) 659-3110. booksoup.com.

GRETCHEN RUBIN

Gretchen Rubin discusses her upcoming book, “The Four Tendencies: The Indispensable Personality Profiles That Reveal How to Make Your Life Better (and Other People’s Lives Better, Too),” with Dr. Daniel J. Siegel, clinical professor of psychiatry at the UCLA School of Medicine, where he helped establish the Mindful Awareness Research Center. Through her research, Rubin has discovered that people fit into four categories: upholders, questioners, obligers and rebels. 8 p.m. $20. Ann and Jerry Moss Theatre at New Roads School, 3131 Olympic Blvd., Santa Monica. livetalksla.org.

What to in Los Angeles the week of July 21-27

July 27: ADL Summer Comedy Soiree

FRI | JULY 21

SHABBAT PICNIC

Come enjoy Shabbat with Adat Chaverim, Congregation for Humanistic Judaism. Bring a picnic dinner; drinks and desserts will be supplied. Shabbat service led by Cantor Jonathan Friedmann. 6 p.m. Free. Encino Park, 16953 Ventura Blvd., Encino. (888) 552-4552. humanisticjudaismla.org.

MEXICAN SHABBAT

Join Young Adults of Los Angeles (YALA) for a vibrant and intimate Shabbat dinner hosted by Susan Schmidt, author of the Mexican-Jewish food blog Challa-peño. She and her family welcome you into their home for food, drink and a conversation about their Mexican-Jewish heritage and culture. Although the event is sold out, there is a waiting list. 7 p.m. $20. Private home in Brentwood; address provided upon RSVP. yala.org/mexicanshabbat.

TORAH FLORA SHABBATON

Biblical and talmudic botanist Jon Greenberg will speak at a series of Shabbat meals about the meaning of the foods and beverages served. Friday’s 7:45 p.m. dinner topic will be “Milk & Honey: Blessing or Curse? Theology, Resilience and the Colors of Wine.” This two-day event continues at 12:30 p.m. Saturday, July 22, when the topics of discussion include “Noah’s Wine vs. Pharaoh’s Beer: The Barroom Brawl and Culture War That Shaped Jewish History” and, at 7:15 p.m., “Olives & Social Security: Edible Lilies, Egyptian God, Israelite Gourmet Export and Dutch Colonial Business Efficiency.” $38 per meal; $32 for members; discounts for children. Westwood Kehilla, 10523 Santa Monica Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 441-5288. kehilla.org/torah-flora.

SAT | JULY 22

COUPLES SHABBAT PICNIC

Sinai Temple’s Atid group of 20- and 30-somethings presents a picnic in the park. Whether you’re married, engaged or it’s your first date, you are welcome at this afternoon picnic to celebrate Shabbat. Everyone should bring lunches for themselves (please prepare dairy/vegetarian meals). Atid events are for young Jewish professionals, ages 21-39. Noon. Free. Please RSVP at eventbrite.com. Holmby Park, 601 Club View Drive, Los Angeles. (310) 474-1518. atidla.com.

SUN | JULY 23

“UNWARRANTED LOVE: REDEMPTION FROM INNER AND OUTER EXILE”

Join Young Jewish Souls and renowned lecturer Rabbi Brandon Gaines, who will speak on the topic of observing the nine days leading to Tisha b’Av through ahavat chinam (loving others freely without judgment). There will be an open bar and dinner with shawarma, falafel and a salad bar to follow. 7 p.m. $15; $20 at the door. Ages 21-39 only. Must RSVP at eventbrite.com. Nessah Educational & Cultural Center, 142 S. Rexford Drive, Beverly Hills. (310) 273-2400. nessah.org.

“YITZHAK RABIN: CHRONICLE OF AN ASSASSINATION”

In 1995, Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin was assassinated. Acclaimed Israeli filmmaker Amos Gitai blends the words of Rabin’s widow, Leah, with live music and projections to create a theatrical counterpoint to his 2015 film, “Rabin, the Last Day.” Actors Einat Weizman and Sarah Adler will read from Leah’s memoirs. 8:30 p.m. Part of the Ignite @ the Ford! series. Tickets start at $30. 2580 Cahuenga Blvd. East, Hollywood. (323) 461-3673. fordtheatres.org.

WED | JULY 26

TISHA B’AV

Tisha b’Av, which begins this year on the evening of July 31, is one of the lesser-known days of the Jewish calendar. Rabbinical student Davina Bookbinder will share the history of this somber day — which commemorates the anniversary of various disasters in Jewish history, including the destruction of the First and Second Temples — and discuss the consequences it has had on our modern Jewish lives. After a catered lunch, there will be a screening of “The Fixer,” the 1968 adaptation of the Bernard Malamud novel about a Jewish man in czarist Russia. 11 a.m. $14; $16 for nonmembers. Temple Menorah, 1101 Camino Real, Redondo Beach. (310) 316-8444. templemenorah.org.

THURS | JULY 27

ADL SUMMER COMEDY SOIREE

Master of ceremonies Bruce Fine will be joined onstage by comedians Ian Bagg, Jeff Garlin, Chris Spencer and Wendy Liebman. Special guest Kosha Dillz also will be contributing with some of his freestyle rapping. 21 and older event. Two-drink minimum. Proceeds benefit the the Anti-Defamation League, fighting anti-Semitism and bigotry in all forms. 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $50; tickets available on eventbrite.com. The Comedy Store, 8433 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 446-4260. adl.org.

THE GUARDIANS SUMMER PARTY

Dress to impress and mix and mingle while toasting the summer and raising money for a good cause. All proceeds benefit The Guardians of the Los Angeles Jewish Home. Cocktail attire. 6 p.m. $18; $30 for two; $20 single tickets at the door; free for Guardian members. Tickets available at eventbrite.com. The W Hotel, 930 Hilgard Ave., Los Angeles. laguardians.org.

Plans for the Fourth of July! Plus Pentatonix and more, 6/30-7/6

Pexels

SAT JULY 1

“YENTL”

The Congregation Beth Shalom Film Series presents a screening of “Yentl,” the story of a young Jewish woman who has to disguise herself as a boy to study Torah. Studying among Orthodox Jewish rabbis, she falls in love with another student, and her situation is further complicated when a woman falls in love with her. The film will be screened outdoors, so bring a folding chair and blanket and be prepared to sing along under the stars. Popcorn and ice cream included. 8 p.m. $5. Congregation Beth Shalom, 21430 Centre Pointe Parkway, Santa Clarita. (661) 254-2411. cbs-scv.org.

SUN JULY 2

PENTATONIX

Celebrate Independence Day with the Grammy-winning a cappella group Pentatonix at the Hollywood Bowl. Its hits include arrangements of Leonard Cohen’s “Hallelujah,” Tchaikovsky’s “Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy” and songs by Daft Punk. The group will be joined by the Hollywood Bowl Orchestra for three evenings of patriotic music and fireworks. 7:30 p.m. Also Monday, July 3,
and Tuesday, July 4. Tickets start at $35. Hollywood Bowl, 2301 Highland Ave., Los Angeles. (323) 850-2000. hollywoodbowl.com.

TUE JULY 4

HUNTINGTON BEACH PIER

Make your Fourth of July an all-day celebration. The festivities kick off with a parade, followed by the Pier Plaza Festival, where you’ll find live entertainment, family activities and traditional food. The fireworks display will end in an epic 500-round finale. 10 a.m. $15 parade bleacher seating; $10 VIP fireworks seating. Main Street, Huntington Beach. hb4thofjuly.org.

PACIFIC PALISADES

For 69 years, Pacific Palisades has been a prime place to celebrate the Fourth of July. Events will start with a group of patriotic skydivers and a parade. Afterward, enjoy concerts, activities, food trucks and fireworks. 2 p.m. parade; 4 p.m. gates open; 9 p.m. fireworks. Free parade; $10 concert and fireworks; free for kids younger than 6. Tickets available at eventbrite.com. Parade: 15120‑15140 Sunset Blvd.; concert and fireworks: 15777 Bowdoin St. palisadesparade.org.

AMERICAFEST @ THE ROSE BOWL

Enjoy a day of classic American food, inflatable rides, games, crafts, a motorcycle stunt show and fireworks to close out the festivities. 2 p.m.; 5:30 p.m. gates open; 9 p.m. fireworks. $15; free for kids younger than 5. The Rose Bowl, 1001 Rose Bowl Drive, Pasadena. (626) 577-3100. rosebowlstadium.com.

GRAND PARK, DTLA

Spend a day in the sun at this unique block party, featuring food truck fare and live music before a 9 p.m. fireworks show. 2 p.m. Free. Grand Park, 200 N. Grand Ave., Los Angeles. grandparkla.org.

CULVER CITY

Enjoy live music, food trucks, games, prizes and, of course, fireworks. Presented by the Exchange Club of Culver City in conjunction with Culver City, Los Angeles County and West Los Angeles College. 4 p.m. $5; free for kids younger than 5. West Los Angeles College, 9000 Overland Ave., Culver City. wlac.edu.

AQUARIUM OF THE PACIFIC

The Aquarium of the Pacific in Long Beach is hosting a Fourth of July barbecue and late-night access to the aquarium for a magnificent waterfront view of the city’s fireworks show. The menu includes hot dogs, brisket, chicken and all the classic American barbecue sides. 5 p.m. $64; $14.95 for fireworks only. Aquarium of the Pacific, 100 Aquarium Way, Long Beach. (562) 590-3100. aquariumofpacific.org.

POMONA FAIRPLEX

Enjoy fireworks and a show of the human cannonball, freestyle motocross riders and monster trucks. 5 p.m. gates open; 8 p.m. show. $18.50. Fairplex, 1101 W. McKinley Ave., Pomona. (909) 623-3111. fairplex.com.

STUDIO CITY

This year, the typical outdoor fair in Studio City has given way to a VIP-only event with dinner, drinks, valet parking and a special rooftop fireworks viewing. There will be face painting and photo ops, making for a family-friendly event. 6 p.m. $125; $60 for kids ages 3-12. CBS Studio Center, 4024 Radford Ave., Los Angeles. (818) 655-5916. studiocitychamber.com.

DODGER STADIUM

See the Los Angeles Dodgers take on the Arizona Diamondbacks. You’ll get front-row seats to the postgame fireworks show and an exclusive T-shirt if you purchase your tickets at m.mlb.com/dodgers/tickets/special-events/independence-day. 6:10 p.m. Tickets start at $62 for this package. Dodger Stadium, 1000 Vin Scully Ave., Los Angeles.