South Africa’s African National Congress endorses Israel boycott, handing BDS movement a victory


South Africa’s ruling party, the African National Congress, voted to make boycotts, divestment and sanctions of Israel part of its official policy.

In a resolution passed Thursday night, at the tail end of its conference this week, the ANC proclaimed it was “unapologetic in its view that the Palestinians are the victims and the oppressed in the conflict with Israel.” The conference called on “all South Africans to support the programs and campaigns of the Palestinian civil society which seek to put pressure on Israel to engage with the Palestinian people to reach a just solution.”

In a second resolution on protests in Israel focused on illegal African immigrants, the ANC said it “abhors the recent Israeli state-sponsored xenophobic attacks and deportation of Africans and requests that this matter should be escalated to the African Union.”

The ANC said it would set up a steering committee to implement the resolutions.

This marks the first time a boycott Israel resolution has been brought up at an ANC conference. Mbuyiseni Ndlozi of BDS South Africa, which pushed hard for the resolution, hailed the vote as a major victory.

“This reaffirmation by the ANC’s National Conference, its highest decision-making body, is by far the most authoritative endorsement of the boycott, divestment and sanctions against Israel campaign,” he said. “The ANC has now taken its international conference resolutions and officially made it the policy of the ANC. We look forward to working with the ANC and specifically the conference steering committee to expedite its implementation.”

The conference ignored a call for evenhandedness on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict by several prominent religious leaders in a front-page open letter in the country's largest newspaper, the Sunday Times. The umbrella body of the country's Jewish community, the South African Jewish Board of Deputies, issued a similar call and requested that a letter on the matter be read at the conference; the request was ignored.

The pro-BDS vote “was not unexpected,” Mary Kluk, national chairwoman of the Board of Deputies, told JTA. She said she had not yet seen the official text of the resolutions. “We will be engaging with the president early next year and will discuss it then.”

She said a meeting with President Jacob Zuma had been confirmed. “It would be premature to comment further,” she said.

South African officials have been adopting an increasingly harsh line toward Israel in recent months. A deputy minister of international relations, Ebrahim Ebrahim, has called on South Africans not to visit Israel, and South African Minister of Trade and Industry Rob Davies promoted a ban on goods from Jewish West Bank. Deputy President and current ANC Chairwoman Baleka Mbete also expressed support for the BDS campaign against Israel at a recent international conference in South Africa.

Pro-Palestinian groups praise ANC boycott call


Pro-Palestinian groups have issued a joint statement supporting the African National Congress’ call to intensify a boycott of Israeli products because of its “Zionist policies,” which it has compared to apartheid.

The South African Council of Churches, Open Shuhada Street, the Congress of South African Trade Unions, Kairos Southern Africa and the Media Review Network said the country’s ruling party should be congratulated for its stance, taken at its policy conference held in Cape Town last week.

“We know South Africa’s voice is particularly important given the oppression people have suffered here under apartheid,” the group said, according to a report in the Cape Times.

“The world is watching South Africa and sometimes takes the lead from us,” Kairos spokeswoman Marthie Momberg said. “It is disturbing how many people—due to ignorance—do not know how Israel is in violation of international law.”

South African Zionist Federation (Cape Council) chairman Ben Levitas said the ANC’s position disqualified it from being “an impartial contributor to the peace process.”

“If the ANC was truly committed to supporting the oppressed, why have they not taken steps to help the Syrians and other oppressed people?” he asked.

‘Catch A Fire’ ignites filmmaker’s memories of anti-apartheid dad


Shawn Slovo remembers how her Jewish parents, African National Congress activists, left home in the middle of the night to attend secret meetings. She recalls police regularly raiding their Johannesburg house and arresting her mother and father. All the while, she said, she resented “having to share my parents with a cause much greater than myself.”

Slovo grew up to become a screenwriter who honored her parents (and exorcised childhood demons) through her movies.

After her mother, Ruth First, was assassinated by a parcel bomb in the early 1980s, she wrote “A World Apart” (1988) about their volatile mother-daughter relationship.

When her father, Joe Slovo, who was chief of staff of the ANC’s military wing, described the black freedom fighter Patrick Chamusso, she penned “Catch a Fire,” which opens Oct. 27.

If “A World Apart” is a tribute to the writer’s mother, “Fire” salutes her father — albeit indirectly — who died in 1995.The thriller recounts how Chamusso, a foreman at South Africa’s Secunda oil refinery, remained apolitical until he was falsely accused of bombing a section of the refinery. After he and his wife were brutally interrogated and tortured, the African became politicized and left his home near the factory to offer his services to Joe Slovo’s guerilla unit in Mozambique. Using his inside knowledge, he told the guerillas he could raze the coal-to-oil refinery and keep it burning for days. With Slovo he created his plan to sneak back over the border, with mines strapped to his body, to furtively enter the factory on a coal conveyor belt. Chamusso only partially succeeded in his mission; he was arrested six days later and spent 10 years in prison on Robben Island. But his solo act raised morale among blacks struggling to overthrow the apartheid regime.

“It sums up the spirit of Joe,” Slovo’s younger sister, Robyn, the film’s producer, said in a telephone interview.

Although Joe Slovo was one of ANC’s top leaders and a close friend of Nelson Mandela, “he was a man who more than anything was interested in ordinary people,” the producer said. “And Patrick Chamusso was an ordinary working man who was completely uninterested in politics until he was terrorized into action.”

The producer denies that Chamusso was a terrorist, or that “Fire” glorifies terrorism.

“There’s nothing equivalent in Patrick’s actions and events taking place in the world today,” she said. “Our film is about the struggle of a man to achieve the right to vote, and democracy in a police state that ran on race lines. It’s much more like the American War of Independence than the suicide bombings in the Middle East.”

Shawn Slovo believes the movie, directed by Phillip Noyce (“Clear and Present Danger”), ties in to a filmmaking trend that would have pleased her father: The telling of an African story from the perspective of a black man rather than a white outsider (her father appears only briefly in the movie). Hollywood studios have released a number of such films this year, including Kevin MacDonald’s recent “The Last King of Scotland,” about Idi Amin. “Fire” has earned mostly good reviews, including one from the Canadian magazine Macleans, saying it “is certain to generate serious heat at the Oscars.”

For the screenwriter, the film is much more than an African espionage drama.

“The parallel for me is the way in which the political affects the personal, and how apartheid shattered and destroyed family life,” she said. “My engagement with the characters and the history has to do with my past, and my family’s past.”

In 1934, the 8-year-old Joe (born Yossel) Slovo immigrated to South Africa to escape pogroms in his native Lithuania. Four years later, he was forced to abandon school to help support his impoverished family, taking a factory job, which was where he first learned of the wage disparity between blacks and whites. He was further politicized while discussing Marxist politics with fellow Jewish immigrants who shared his ramshackle boarding house.

By age 16 he had joined the South African Communist Party and rejected Zionism in favor of his own country’s liberation movement. Even so, he considered himself “100 percent Jewish” and linked his work to the historical Jewish struggle for social justice, Robyn Slovo said.

At law school, he met First, daughter of Russian Jewish communists, and Nelson Mandela, with whom he helped found the ANC’s military wing in 1961. Slovo was abroad, two years later, when Mandela and others were arrested and sentenced to life in prison at Robben Island.Shawn was 13 that year, and she was desperate for her parents’ attention as her father vanished into exile; in retaliation for his disappearance, First was arrested and placed in solitary confinement, where she attempted suicide to avoid cracking under psychological torture. With her father labeled South Africa’s most wanted man and “Public Enemy No. 1,” Shawn was taunted at school, where even her Jewish best friend ostracized her. (Robyn and another sister were hounded as well.)

“A 13-year-old doesn’t understand politics; she just wants her parents,” the screenwriter said. “But I also felt guilty, because how could I complain about their absence when they were fighting for the liberation of 28 million blacks?”

After her mother’s suicide attempt, the family was allowed to immigrate to England, where Shawn Slovo insisted upon attending boarding school because she felt unsafe at home.

“It was also a rebellion, a reaction to the past turbulence,” she said. She entered the film business because “it was as far away from my parents’ work as I could get.”

During the rest of her childhood, Joe Slovo was mostly abroad in ANC training camps, reachable only through an intermediary or a fake name and address.

In the early 1980s, when she was in her 30s, she began to confront her parents about their devotion to politics over family. Joe declined to answer her questions, in his avuncular, matter-of-fact way: “His response was always, ‘This was in the past, let’s put it behind us and move forward,'” the screenwriter recalled.