An update: Jews Democratic, Orthodox Jews Republican


This is not much more than an update, containing two links to two recent posts in which there was data about the composition of the Jewish vote.

 

The first post is by Prof. Steven Cohen, based on the recent Jewish Journal survey of Jewish opinion. Cohen writes that “If the 2016 presidential election were held today, Jewish voters nationwide would probably split 70-30 for the Democratic candidate, much as they did in 2012”:

Younger Jews are more Democratic than older Jews. The details: Those younger than 40 are more firmly in the Democratic camp (69 percent to 12 percent, with 19 percent undecided) than Jews age 65 and older (56 percent for the Democratic candidate, 24 percent for the Republican, the rest undecided). 

The most highly educated are the most highly Democratic. That is to say: The Democratic-Republican gap is truly huge among Jews with a post-graduate education (76 percent versus 8 percent, Democrat versus Republican), contrasting sharply with those who have no college degree (49 percent  to 25 percent). 

The most affluent are more Democratic. The Democrat-Republican presidential preference gap is higher among those earning $150,000 annually or more (61 percent Democratic, 9 percent Republican) than among the least affluent: those earning less than $50,000 per year (49 percent, 24 percent). 

And family matters. As in the larger population, the unmarried without children at home are especially prone to lean Democratic (60 percent to 17 percent), as compared with married people with children at home (57 percent to 26 percent, for the Democrat and Republican respectively).

The Pew research center released an analysis of the Orthodox Jewish community, in which one can find the following political information:

Compared with other U.S. Jews, Orthodox Jews are far more socially and politically conservative. When the survey was conducted in 2013, 57% of Orthodox Jews said they identified with or leaned toward the Republican Party. By contrast, just 18% of other Jews identified with or leaned toward the GOP. Orthodox Jews were also much more likely than other Jews to self-identify as politically conservative (54% vs. 16%).

Here’s the table of Jewish Party ID, including the recent addition from Cohen:

Year

GOP

Dem

Ind

Not Sure

2015*******

12

55

33

2015*****

24

66

10

2014**

29

61

2014*****

21

68

11

2013****

30

65

2013*

15

52

32

2013******

22

70

2013**

28

64

2012*****

26

67

8

2012**

27

66

2012*

19

52

26

2

2011**

27

64

2011*****

20

70

10

2011 *

16

45

38

2

2010 *

17

48

34

1

2010*****

26

66

9

2010 *

15

50

32

2

2010**

27

65

2010 ****

33

60

2009*****

24

70

7

2009**

24

69

2009 *

16

53

30

1

2008*****

25

67

8

2008**

22

71

2008 *

17

56

25

2

2008****

20

72

**** 2006

26

68

2005 *

16

54

29

1

2004 *

16

54

29

2

2002- 2004 **

16

50

34

2001-2002**

17

50

33

2000 *

9

59

30

2

1996 *

52

1991-2002 ***

51.7

1992-2001**

18

50

32

1981-90 ***

53.9

1972-80 ***

57.8

 

 

* AJC annual surveys of Jewish opinion; ** Gallup; *** Jewish Distinctiveness in America, Tom W. Smith. T, 2005; **** Pew ***** JS ****** PEW (Portrait of Jewish Americans), ******* Jewish Journal survey

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