October 19, 2018

World

In Jamal Khashoggi's final column for the Washington Post, the late columnist makes an impassioned plea for freedom of expression in the Arab world. "Arab governments have been given free rein to continue silencing the media at an increasing rate."

“The Chernobyl nuclear disaster of 1986 left a ring of ghost villages as residents fled… now people are choosing to live in the crumbling houses on the edge of the exclusion zone.”

“The great sticking point—around the Irish border—has always been there.”

“America’s economy, thanks to Trump’s deep cuts in taxes and regulations, is powering ahead.”

“Some Catholic leaders are using the sex abuse crisis to unseat Pope Francis.”

“You buy a purse at Walmart. There’s a note inside from a ‘Chinese prisoner.’ Now what?”

“Conservatives win in Ontario and Quebec and may soon lead as many as six of 10 provinces.”

“The latest disaster in Indonesia shows the need for the global system put in place in the wake of 2004’s devastating waves.”

Jamal Khashoggi, a Saudi journalist and political dissident, has gone missing. Was he killed for his political beliefs?

Australia’s economy thrives on immigration – and could collapse if the influx of immigrants slows down.

“Indonesia covers many complex tectonic environments. Many details of these are still poorly understood, which hampers our ability to predict earthquake and tsunami risks.”

“The case of Tunisia shows that the anger of disappointed middle-class youths is driving radicalization more than poverty or unemployment.”

“Washington should listen to the will of the American people and leave Baghdad.”

“The United States supplies bombs and other support for the war that’s killed civilians and is creating famine.”

“It is the greatest story of our time, and it’s one few have heard of. Mankind is defeating extreme poverty.”

“If Washington’s mayhem doesn’t interfere, discussion of Iran is poised to dominate the UN General Assembly.”

Brexit was just the start. Add Irexit to the mix, and factor in the brewing trouble over Poland and Hungary’s brotherhood of democratic backsliding, and we’re looking at a full-blown EU crisis.

China's massive and rapid investments in Africa have been criticized by some as a form of economic colonialism. Others are just wondering why the West is missing out on the opportunity.

North Korea has committed itself to denuclearization… again. The breakthrough deal between North and South Korea is being celebrated. But why should we trust North Korea this time?

“The repression of the Turkic Uighur Muslim community in western China [.] is a key part of Beijing’s new imperial policy. Only by understanding the dynamics of Chinese empire can one grasp this brutal campaign.”

China’s most famous actress received a zero rating in China’s Orwellian social credit system. Now she’s gone missing.

"If ever two leaders wanted the world to see their 'bromance', it's Vladimir Putin and Xi Jinping… But beneath the warmth, some analysts believe long-held mutual suspicions remain."

Yesterday was the anniversary of Al Qaeda's devastating September 11th attacks. Seventeen years later, how has Al Qaeda managed to survive the War on Terror?

India has officially decriminalized homosexuality. The long-awaited repeal of the British Colonial-era law sheds light on the political divisions at work in the increasingly polarized Indian society.

Months after Donald Trump and Kim Jong Un shared their historic handshake, it seems that neither of them has done much to follow up on their agreement to move towards denuclearization. Here's why Trump shouldn't give up on North Korea just yet.

A number of escalating conflicts in the Middle East, such as Assad’s attacks on Idlib and Iran’s continuing creep into Iraq, threaten to further destabilize the region. Will America get involved?

JJ Best Of The Web

In Jamal Khashoggi's final column for the Washington Post, the late columnist makes an impassioned plea for freedom of expression in the Arab world. "Arab governments have been given free rein to continue silencing the media at an increasing rate."

"The country—consciously or unconsciously—has gotten used to Donald Trump. Twenty-one months into his administration, Mr. Trump has been processed, or half-processed—even subtly domesticated—by the large, complicated American mind..."

The old Israel is represented in this case by the main casualty of the new train: the historic Jerusalem-Tel Aviv line, which has been running on and off since 1892 and isn’t likely to run much longer.

"The Conners is the Roseanne revival we should save had. Instead of making hay of culture war flashpoints, the spinoff stays focused on the family’s bleakly circumscribed reality."

The dizzying run-up in crypto prices in 2017 was followed, this year, by a long, lurching retreat that, as the summer gave way to fall, began to seem perilous.

"Recently my son visited a Holocaust Museum where a program called New Dimensions in Testimony provided a hologram of an Auschwitz survivor. The unreal man would answer any question the children asked about the horrors of history. "

"As a queer Black Clevelander, the podcast's new season investigating criminal justice in Cleveland clarifies a lifetime of racist interactions with police."

"On Tuesday, Stephen Hawking's final, posthumous book 'Brief Answers to the Big Questions' was released, detailing final thoughts the physicist had on the biggest questions humankind faces. In the book, Hawking wrote 'there is no God.'"

"Young people are among the loneliest of all Americans. Schools that teach kids how to deal with feelings of isolation could help put a dent in the epidemic."

"The framework of a “Cheat Day” and reification of these foods being “improper” is, frankly, rotten at its core. These foods are a “cheat” because the consequences of guiltlessly and regularly eating them—which is to say, the appearance of fatness."

"A mere half a degree could spell the difference between the Arctic being ice-free once a decade and once a century; between coral reefs being almost entirely wiped out and up to 30 percent hanging on..."

Some Jewish thinkers are eager to reconcile science and religion by reconciling the Torah with the scientific theories. But science and religion are different fields of knowledge and address different concerns.