October 19, 2018

Culture

"As a queer Black Clevelander, the podcast's new season investigating criminal justice in Cleveland clarifies a lifetime of racist interactions with police."

“This desire to inflect price, to bargain, to determine shopping behaviors in advance, is a common denominator for contemporary artists—you might say it’s the lowest.”

On sensitive issues, most Americans are censoring themselves.

“Do you send Venmo requests for less than $5?”

“Religiously unaffiliated voters, who may or may not be associated with other civic institutions, seem most excited about supporting or donating to causes…”

Quoting Churchill can get you in trouble on Twitter these days.

“Nanette erodes the separation between comedy and TED Talk.”

“How cities turned against a controversial holiday.”

A new book from Radha Argawal offers a practical solution for American isolation.

What happens to art when we judge it for its political correctness and not its quality?

“How Ivy League resentments took over the Kavanaugh debate.”

“Rose is no longer a scandal-making firebrand… Her polished public persona inverts the talking points of modern feminism.”

“I went to as many Instagramable “museums,” “factories” and “mansions” as I could. They nearly broke me.”

“Conspicuous consumption,” the act of buying a luxury item to impress people, may backfire on you. Many Americans find luxury goods repulsive.

“Is language produced by the mind? Romantic theory has it otherwise: words emerge from the cosmos, expressing its soul.”

Home DNA kits are more popular than ever and people are using them to better understand where they come from and who they are – but there’s a dark side to deriving culture from DNA.

Is the “wellness movement” just a PC rebranding of weight loss regimens and fad diets? If the Weight Watchers’ new branding campaign is any indication, it would seem so.

If SJWs often resemble religious fundamentalists, bell hooks is their highest prophet. Her work on gender and intersectionality have redefined American campuses, and her ideas are being put into action with religious fervor.

Reciting “The Pledge of Allegiance” at school is so common as to be taken for granted in American schools. The truth is, it’s not that common. And we haven’t always done it.

The NFL is back, which means that America is gearing up for more heated discussions about kneelers. Here’s how to discuss NFL protests with a bit of civility.

"It’s the largest single entertainment property in the U.S., a $14 billion per year attention-sucking machine with a steady hold on the lives of tens of millions. And its future is now in widespread doubt."

St. John’s College is unique amongst liberal arts colleges. Resisting all current trends in higher education, including the high cost, America should be paying attention.

Move over, Fidget Spinner. There’s a whole industry of consumer goods being marketed toward America’s anxiety-stricken.

Move over, millennials. It’s time for a new generation’s habits and tastes to be put under the microscope. Meet Gen-Z. They’re financially cautious, pragmatic, and they’re coming to an office near you.

The role of the athlete has changed in the age of Trump. To see how, look no further Colin Kaepernick, the controversial player whose NFL career has been about everything but football.

Global wealth disparity is becoming more dramatic and the idea of a middle-class is becoming an outdated notion. It's having an effect on the art market.

JJ Best Of The Web

In Jamal Khashoggi's final column for the Washington Post, the late columnist makes an impassioned plea for freedom of expression in the Arab world. "Arab governments have been given free rein to continue silencing the media at an increasing rate."

"The country—consciously or unconsciously—has gotten used to Donald Trump. Twenty-one months into his administration, Mr. Trump has been processed, or half-processed—even subtly domesticated—by the large, complicated American mind..."

The old Israel is represented in this case by the main casualty of the new train: the historic Jerusalem-Tel Aviv line, which has been running on and off since 1892 and isn’t likely to run much longer.

"The Conners is the Roseanne revival we should save had. Instead of making hay of culture war flashpoints, the spinoff stays focused on the family’s bleakly circumscribed reality."

The dizzying run-up in crypto prices in 2017 was followed, this year, by a long, lurching retreat that, as the summer gave way to fall, began to seem perilous.

"Recently my son visited a Holocaust Museum where a program called New Dimensions in Testimony provided a hologram of an Auschwitz survivor. The unreal man would answer any question the children asked about the horrors of history. "

"As a queer Black Clevelander, the podcast's new season investigating criminal justice in Cleveland clarifies a lifetime of racist interactions with police."

"On Tuesday, Stephen Hawking's final, posthumous book 'Brief Answers to the Big Questions' was released, detailing final thoughts the physicist had on the biggest questions humankind faces. In the book, Hawking wrote 'there is no God.'"

"Young people are among the loneliest of all Americans. Schools that teach kids how to deal with feelings of isolation could help put a dent in the epidemic."

"The framework of a “Cheat Day” and reification of these foods being “improper” is, frankly, rotten at its core. These foods are a “cheat” because the consequences of guiltlessly and regularly eating them—which is to say, the appearance of fatness."

"A mere half a degree could spell the difference between the Arctic being ice-free once a decade and once a century; between coral reefs being almost entirely wiped out and up to 30 percent hanging on..."

Some Jewish thinkers are eager to reconcile science and religion by reconciling the Torah with the scientific theories. But science and religion are different fields of knowledge and address different concerns.