Jewish Democratic Council of America (JDCA) Condemns Upcoming Neo-Nazi Rally


REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

UPDATE: When asked for comment, Republican Jewish Coalition (RJC) Digital Director Neil Strauss referred the Journal to the RJC’s statement on Charlottesville in 2017, which read, “We mourn the loss of life at Charlottesville this weekend, and will continue to pray for all those impacted. Anti-Semitism and all forms of hate are anti-American, anti-Jewish, and antithetical to any sense of decency. We regret that we continue to be faced with these issues, but the RJC will never shy away from our role of standing up to racists, fascists, and Nazis.”

Strauss also told the Journal, “I would also reiterate that we don’t believe racism and anti-Semitism have any place in our political system or civilized society.”

ORIGINAL:

Some Jewish groups are denouncing the upcoming “Unite the Right 2” white supremacist rally, which is happening a year after the infamous Charlottesville rally.

The Unite the Right 2 rally is taking place on August 12, where neo-Nazis and white supremacists will be marching from Freedom Plaza to Lafayette Square in front of the White House, where alt-right figures, such as known anti-Semite Paul Nehlen, will be speaking. Organizers of the rally have stated that swastika flags are not allowed, but American and Confederate flags are.

Jewish Democratic Council for America (JDCA) condemned the upcoming protest.

“The Jewish Democratic Council of America (JDCA) condemns in the strongest possible terms the Unite the Right rally in our nation’s capital this weekend,” the JDCA said in a statement. “This protest, marking one year since the horrific events in Charlottesville, promises to be another display of the racism, anti-Semitism, and bigotry that has grown in our country during the Trump administration. We implore protestors to demonstrate peacefully, and applaud the Metropolitan Police Department for taking every measure to prevent the rally from devolving into violence.”

The JDCA also denounced the various white supremacist and neo-Nazis running as Republicans in the November election.

The Anti-Defamation League (ADL) is calling on people to “reject white supremacists’ message of hate.”

“Since Charlottesville, white supremacist violence has impacted communities across the country,” the ADL’s action page states. “But the backlash of everyday Americans against their hateful ideology has proven a strong deterrent. Together, America is stronger than hate and our values are stronger than bigotry.”

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