Calendar: January 20-26


FRI | JAN 20

SHABBAT TRIBUTE TO MLK

Celebrate the life and legacy of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. at Kol Tikvah, with Rabbi Jon Hanish and Cantor Noa Shaashua. Special guests Dr. Dee and the Sacred Praise Chorale, one of Los Angeles’ premier gospel choirs, will also be featured. Everyone is welcome to attend this soulful event. Followed by socializing, sweet treats and coffee. 6:30 p.m. Free. Kol Tikvah, 20400 Ventura Blvd., Woodland Hills. (818)348-0670. koltikvah.org.

SHISHI ISRAELI

Bring family and friends for a Shishi Israeli celebration at the IAC Shepher Community Center, which has undergone a major renovation. There will be a kosher dinner, activities and live music. 6:30 p.m. $21 for adults; $13 for children. IAC Shepher Community Center, 6530 Winnetka Ave., Woodland Hills. israeliamerican.org.

SAT | JAN 21

WOMEN’S MARCH

If you support human rights, tolerance and compassion for humanity, join in this diverse event, which will start at Pershing Square (532 S. Olive St.) and end at City Hall (200 N. Spring St., Los Angeles). 9 a.m. Free. Downtown Los Angeles. (310) 200-0124. womensmarchla.org.

“NOURISHING TRADITION”

Gain insight into how Jewish artists think about food, home and traditions at the new exhibit “Nourishing Tradition.” It will feature paintings and sculptural assemblies by artists including Judy Dekel, Harriete Estel Berman, Betty Green, Harriet Glaser, Benny Ferdman, Marleene Rubenstein, Marilee Tolwin and Penny Wolin. The evening includes a reception and an artist talk. 6:30 p.m. reception; 7 p.m. artist talk. Free. Through March 5. The Braid, 2912 Colorado Ave., No. 102, Santa Monica. (310) 315-1400. jewishwomenstheatre.org.

“THE MATZO BALL DIARIES”

In “The Matzo Ball Diaries,” 15 professional and amateur writers reveal funny and poignant moments about the power of food. A boy decides to give up certain Jewish foods in order to lose weight, but will he lose his religion after he loses weight? Another man begins a food franchise only to realize the impact he has had on Americans. These and other moving stories will be presented at a variety of venues. 8 p.m. $40. The Braid, 2912 Colorado Ave., No. 102, Santa Monica. Additional shows presented at synagogues throughout Los Angeles. (310) 315-1400. jewishwomenstheatre.org.

SUN | JAN 22

“CHAMPIONING CIVIL RIGHTS & RESISTING INJUSTICE”

The late Rabbi Joachim Prinz and composer Kurt Weill were German-Jewish emigres who fled Nazi Germany for the United States. This symposium will put the lives and works of these two men in conversation. Their shared historical foundation for social justice will be explored as well as each individual’s contribution to the world. The event is part of the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra’s “Lift Every Voice” festival. Followed by a concert in Royce Hall. 9:30 a.m. Free. UCLA, 314 Royce Hall, Los Angeles. (310) 267-5327. cjs.ucla.edu.

RUNNING CLUSTER

Join Young Adults of Los Angeles’ Running Cluster for a four-mile run up Sunset Boulevard, past the outskirts of Bel Air and through the heart of Westwood. Meet afterward at Nekter Juice Bar (10912 Lindbrook Drive, Westwood Village) for a juice or bite to eat. 9:30 a.m. Free. UCLA, 10899 Le Conte Ave., Los Angeles. (323) 761-8000. yala.org.

“LARRY BELL: PACIFIC RED”

The Frederick R. Weisman Museum of Art at Pepperdine University presents “Larry Bell: Pacific Red.” There will be a reception to meet Bell, who was a founder of the California Light and Space movement in the 1960s. He has pushed the boundaries of perception and technology in his mission to explore light and vision. “Pacific Red” features a historical survey of his art from the 1950s and ’60s as well as a new installation designed for the galleries at the Weisman Museum of Art. 2 p.m. Free. Through April 2. Pepperdine University, 24255 Pacific Coast Highway, Malibu. (310) 506-4851. arts.pepperdine.edu/museum.

ANNIE KORZEN WITH FRITZ COLEMAN

Annie Korzen returns to the stage with longtime Southern California weathercaster Fritz Coleman. Korzen will do a short set before introducing Coleman. After the performance, Korzen will sit down with Coleman to discuss his background, experiences and passions. The audience is encouraged to ask questions. 5 p.m. $25. American Jewish University, Familian Campus, 15600 Mulholland Drive, Los Angeles. (310) 440-1572. wcce.aju.edu.

“ANI YERUSHALMI”

“Ani Yerushalmi” is an original musical from Israel, featuring Yehoram Gaon, one of Israel’s most prominent and iconic actors and singers. The musical tells the story of Gaon’s childhood in Jerusalem and the events that led to the reunification of the city in 1967. 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $60. Broad Stage, 1310 11th St., Santa Monica. (818) 456-8527. maticenter.com.

TUES | JAN 24

“THINK DIFFERENT” WITH AMIT KLEINBERGER

 

JNET Woodland Hills presents Amit Kleinberger, CEO of Menchie’s Frozen Yogurt, which has become the fastest-growing food franchise in the United States and the largest frozen yogurt franchise in the world. Kleinberger, who served in the Israel Defense Forces, will discuss the keys to his business success. 6 p.m. Free. RSVP at eventbrite.com. Temple Aliyah, 6025 Valley Circle Blvd., Los Angeles. jnetonline.org.

KLEZMER: A LIVE MUSICAL REVIVAL

JDC Entwine presents a klezmer concert and exploration of Jewish identity through music. Learn how young Jews are putting a modern spin on traditional Jewish music. There will be a live performance by Orchestra Euphonos and an exclusive screening of a short film featuring Zhenya Lopatnik, a leading voice in the Yiddish-language music scene. Complimentary drinks. 21-and-older event. 7 p.m. $15. Tickets available at eventbrite.com. The Record Parlour, 6408 Selma Ave., Los Angeles. jdcentwine.org.

THURS | JAN 26

“JEWISH IDENTITY IN QUESTION: THE LEGACY OF IRENE NEMIROVSKY”

Susan Rubin Suleiman, a research professor at Harvard University, will discuss Jewish identity in the life and work of Irene Nemirovsky. Nemirovsky was an accomplished novelist during the 1930s but was deported from France because she was a Russian Jew, and she died in Auschwitz. Many believed Nemirovsky to be anti-Semitic because of her portrayal of Jews in her novels. Nemirovsky’s story reflects many assimilated Jews in Europe who had abandoned Jewish religious practice but were still persecuted by the Nazis. 4 p.m. Free. UCLA Faculty Center, 480 Charles E. Young Drive East, Los Angeles. (310) 267-5327. cjs.ucla.edu.

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