Calendar November 22-28


SAT | NOV 22

“HANNAH AND HER SISTERS”

If you think your family’s Thanksgiving dinners are complicated, just consult this Woody Allen classic. The 1986 film tells the story of Hannah (Mia Farrow), her husband, Elliot (Michael Caine), and the infidelities and lives of a close-knit eccentric family. Winner of three Academy Awards, including best original screenplay, the movie was the director’s biggest box-office hit for a long time. If you’re curious about one of the commercial successes of one of our not-so-commercial artists, revisit this filmic staple. Costume designers Jeffrey Kurland and Deborah Nadoolman Landis, one of Hollywood’s most accomplished in her field, will be in discussion. Sat. 7:30 p.m. $5 (general), $3 (film club members and students). LACMA, 5905 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (323) 857-6010. ” target=”_blank”>einsteintheplay.com


SUN | NOV 23

“ROCKETS, JOURNALISTS AND FILMS”

They came to cover the 2014 Jerusalem Film Festival and ended up with front-row seats to a war drama playing out on the global political stage. Operation Protective Edge wasn’t a title on the festival lineup, it was the real-life summer saga that left more than 2,000 Israelis and Palestinians dead. A few of today’s leading film critics will offer their perspectives on witnessing firsthand one of Jerusalem’s most tragic summers during what should have been a regular stop on the film-festival circuit. Featuring Ella Taylor, professor at USC and regular contributor to Variety, Jewish Journal and npr.org; Amy Nicholson, author and chief film critic for LA Weekly; and Uri Dromi, columnist and director general of the Jerusalem Press Club. Sun. 4 p.m. $18. The Whizin Center at AJU, 15600 Mulholland Drive, Los Angles. (310) 476-9777. ” target=”_blank”>booksoup.com.

“LUNA GALE”

Rebecca Gilman’s new play follows veteran social worker Caroline as she tries her best to protect and help baby Luna Gale. But working within a bureaucracy can mean hidden motives, long-held secrets and moral ambiguity, so it’s not exactly smooth sailing. Gilman, the first American playwright to win an Evening Standard Award, is best known for her widely and well-received plays “Spinning Into Butter” and “Boy Gets Girl.” Directed by Robert Falls, the play is a powerful piece of passion and conviction. Sun. 8 p.m. $25-$39. Through Dec. 21. Kirk Douglas Theatre, 9820 W. Washington Blvd., Culver City. (213) 628-2772. TUE | NOV 25

“IT DID HAPPEN HERE: ANTI-NAZI ACTIVISM IN LOS ANGELES”

In the face of true horror, any form of resistance is powerful. With Hitler’s ascent to power in 1933 Germany, anti-Semitism reared its ugly head all around the world, including in Los Angeles. While many locals remained indifferent, the L.A. Jewish community mobilized, combating the hate. Historians Laura Rosenzweig and Caroline Luce will discuss their forthcoming digital exhibit on this little-known but largely important chapter of L.A. history. Tue. 4 p.m. Free. Must RSVP. Royce Hall at UCLA, 340 Royce Drive, Los Angeles. (310) 267-5327.

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