Calendar March 8-14


SAT | MAR 8

NAOMI SHIHAB NYE

The award-winning poet is in conversation with reporter Lisa Napoli, and with such a rich career and history, eavesdropping just won’t cut it. An Arab-American who pens peace, heritage and humanitarian spirit, Nye is the author of several books of poetry as well as fiction for children. She has won four Pushcart Prizes, has been a Guggenheim Fellow and received The Academy of American Poets’ Lavan Award.  But don’t take our word for it — hear for yourself what she has to say. Sat. 7:30 p.m. Free. Lenart Auditorium at the Fowler Museum, North Campus of UCLA, Los Angeles. (310) 825-2101. ” target=”_blank”>santamonicaplayhouse.com.


SUN | MAR 9

“THE SEARCHERS: THE MAKING OF AN AMERICAN LEGEND”

Pulitzer Prize reporter Glenn Frankel signs his new book, an investigation into the true story that inspired the landmark Western movie. In 1836, 9-year-old Cynthia Ann Parker was kidnapped and raised by the Comanche tribe, eventually becoming a wife and mother to a Comanche husband and son. The story centers around the universal search for identity and community in conflicting worlds. After a film screening, Frankel will be in discussion. Sun. 3 p.m. $20. American Jewish University, 15600 Mulholland Drive, Bel-Air.(310) 476-9777. ” target=”_blank”>lajewishsymphony.com.


MON | MAR 10

“WHO REALLY WROTE THE BIBLE AND WHY?”

Dr. Marvin Sweeney, professor of Hebrew Bible at Claremont Lincoln University, has some thoughts on the question we’ve all been asking:  Were the Five Books of Moses really given on Mount Sinai? With late-20th century research claiming the Five Books came from separate sources and were then edited together, Sweeney’s theory that the Hebrew Bible originated in Israel and was later combined with other writings gives pause to that initial 20th century conclusion. Mon. 7:30 p.m. $15 (general), $12 (seniors). Wilshire Boulevard Temple, 3663 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. (818) 762-5500. WED | MAR 12

“IRAQ N’ ROLL”

 

Israeli rock musician Dudu Tassa journeys back to his musical roots in this moving documentary about family, culture and connection. The grandson of celebrated Jewish Iraqi-based musician Daud al-Kuwaity, Tassa aims to rediscover his grandfather’s legacy — one that the 1930s musician struggled to maintain when he tried to bring Middle Eastern music to a Western-oriented Israel in the 1950s. Filmmaker Gili Gaon poignantly creates a dialogue between generations, artists, and identities lost and found. Wed. 6:30 p.m. Free. Royce Hall at UCLA, 340 Royce Drive, Los Angeles. (310) 825-9646. ” target=”_blank”>skirball.org.

+