Save the date, save the world


Wedding invitations have traditionally gone beyond telling friends and family about the whens and wheres of a couple’s big day. Through use of color, typefaces and embellishments, they made a statement about a couple’s personality and tastes.

As the environment and economy play roles in changing tradition, today’s couples are compelled to think beyond the surface of their invitations, as well as R.S.V.P. cards, thank-you notes and programs.

Stationery purveyors, many thriving online, are not only up on “surface detail” trends, but also environmentally sound alternatives to traditional wedding stationery. Savvy couples are realizing — in increasing numbers — that when they send out invites, they are also sending out a message about their own sustainability practices. Some are turning away from paper and ink altogether and looking to cyberspace for their wedding communication needs, from the invites to thank-you notes, as well as albums and scrapbooks.

Stacy Broff, a Los Angeles event publicist/planner and bride-to-be, is well versed on current trends professionally and personally. Her wedding is planned as “a simple but classy event,” and she stresses the importance of striking a balance between creating the “fairy tale,” staying within budget and doing her part for the environment.

Broff researched a company selling eco-friendly invitations. While she acknowledges the ultimate way to invite green is to use e-mail, she and the client felt paper invites were necessary for the audience they wanted to reach. Westside green Realtor/broker Pence Hathorn Silver served as her invite inspiration.

“Some brides seek out luxury because, after all, this is their big day,” Broff said. “However, Pence Hathorn Silver gave me thank-you notes that can be planted in the garden instead of tossed in the trash — what a perfect way to say thank you and do something good for the Earth. Meanwhile, I combed through dozens of wedding sites and wedding magazines, and found many companies offering eco-friendly goods and services. I advise brides to take the time to pick and choose what solutions are most important to them. You can’t do everything — but you can do a lot.”

” target=”_blank”>www.botanicalpaperworks.com, which offers invitations made with wildflower seeds. He also notices that Web site addresses are showing up more often on invites, which offers couples a paper-free way to create elaborate wedding sites that incorporate details of the wedding and all events (bachelor/bachelorette parties, rehearsal dinner, bridal shower), along with ceremony site, restaurants and accommodations.

Jonathan Abrams, who founded social networking Web site Friendster, has capitalized on the paperless movement with ” target=”_blank”>Minted.com, which launched in April and exclusively offers green stationery from Oblation and Wiley.

She recommended that brides visit ” target=”_blank”>GoGreen.com offers insight into how eco-friendly invites help the planet:

  • Use post-consumer waste or recycled paper products, or “paper” made from grasses, cotton, flax, hemp, straw, silk and silk blends.
  • When you use these products, know that you are reducing chlorine pollution!
  • Do something unique like using pretty postcards as your invitation.
  • If postcards are not your thing, try to reduce the amount of paper used overall. Reconsider the use of paper and tissue inserts.
  • Think about your ink! If you print your invites at home, refill your ink cartridges. When you get rid of cartridges, donate them to a cause or drop in a recycling box. Also, seek online companies that print with earth friendly inks, and others sell similar inks for home use.

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