Danny Corsun (right) leads a pre-Passover cooking class for the Cool Shul community on a recent weekend morning in Marina del Rey. Photo by Josh Marks

Danny Corsun cooks up holiday food for thought


The aromas of flour, olive oil, apples, basil, pomegranates and sun-dried tomatoes filled the kitchen as modern-day Jews, young and old, made matzo just as their ancient Israelite ancestors did in their haste out of Egypt on their journey to the Promised Land.

Members of Cool Shul, a Westside synagogue associated with the Jewish Universalism movement, participated in a recent pre-Passover cooking class in a private home in Marina del Rey, led by chef Danny Corsun from Culinary Kids Academy. In addition to matzo, the group of about 25 helped Corsun put together charoset and pesto.

“Somehow, some way, we can look at what we are being given in the Torah and use it as a guide on how to live our own lives,” Corsun explained before inviting the class to chop apples and knead dough. “So, what we do at Culinary Kids is, we take things that happened 3,500 years ago and show you that, actually, you can use this stuff today in 2017.”

Experiencing the biblical Exodus by making matzo is an example of how Culinary Kids and Cool Shul are creating a hands-on form of Judaism, what Corsun calls an attempt at making it personal.

“It’s a way for them to be involved in their Judaism where they’re not just sitting in front of a book or sitting in the sanctuary,” said Helen Nightengale, board president at Cool Shul.

Cool Shul has worked with Corsun before other holidays to use food as a teaching tool. Rabbi and Cantor Diane Rose, spiritual leader at Cool Shul, worked with Corsun during her previous stint at Beth Shir Shalom, a Reform synagogue in Santa Monica.

“We take things that happened 3,500 years ago and show you that, actually, you can do this stuff today in 2017.” — Danny Corsun, Culinary Kids Academy

“He’s the perfect way to do experiential education,” Rose said of Corsun’s cooking class. “Historically, he’s always done it with us with the kids, but there’s no reason why all the adults don’t need experiential Jewish education, as well, so it’s a really good partnership. All those adults signed up to come learn how to make matzo — it’s a Cool Shul family educational event.”

As the class began, children and adults gathered around Corsun as he demonstrated how to make matzo — take the flour; make a hole in the middle and add salt, olive oil and water; put the dough together; flatten the dough with a rolling pin; put it in a pan; stretch it, making it as flat as possible so it comes out thin and crispy; blast in a 500-degree oven for 18 minutes.

“We’re going to talk about a story today while the matzo is baking, but it’s about actually taking ownership,” Corsun said. “What we’re trying to do is make Judaism personal. I’m no longer doing it because my mother told me to. I’m no longer doing it because the rabbi tells me to. I’m doing it because I’m getting something out of it. This is actually informing my decisions on how I’m forming my life.” n

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